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Beta-alanine increase oxidation in the brain of rats

beta-alanine

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#1 Fredrik

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 04:21 PM


Just something to pay attention to if you supplement with beta-alanine. Published April 26 2013. Peritoneal injections decreased superoxide dismutase activity and increased oxidation in the brains of rats.

How this research applies to humans is unknown but I´m sure some of the more conservative supplementers would like to take a look:

Mol Cell Biochem. 2013 Apr 26.

Effects of β-alanine administration on selected parameters of oxidative stress and phosphoryltransfer network in cerebral cortex and cerebellum of rats.
Gemelli T, de Andrade RB, Rojas DB, Bonorino NF, Mazzola PN, Tortorelli LS, Funchal C, Filho CS, Wannmacher CM.
Source
Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, Rua Ramiro Barcelos 2600-Anexo, Porto Alegre, RS, CEP 90035-003, Brazil.

Abstract
β-Alanine is a β-amino acid derivative of the degradation of pyrimidine uracil and precursor of the oxidative substrate acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). The accumulation of β-alanine occurs in β-alaninemia, an inborn error of metabolism. Patients with β-alaninemia may develop neurological abnormalities whose mechanisms are far from being understood. In this study we evaluated the effects of β-alanine administration on some parameters of oxidative stress and on creatine kinase, pyruvate kinase, and adenylate kinase in cerebral cortex and cerebellum of 21-day-old rats. The animals received three peritoneal injections of β-alanine (0.3 mg /g of body weight) and the controls received the same volume (10 μL/g of body weight) of saline solution (NaCl 0.85 %) at 3 h intervals. CSF levels of β-alanine increased five times, achieving 80 μM in the rats receiving the amino acid. The results of β-alanine administration in the parameters of oxidative stress were similar in both tissues studied: reduction of superoxide dismutase activity, increased oxidation of 2',7'-dihydrodichlorofluorescein, total content of sulfhydryl and catalase activity. However, the results of the phosphoryltransfer network enzymes were similar in all enzymes, but different in the tissues studied: the β-alanine administration was able to inhibit the enzyme pyruvate kinase, cytosolic creatine kinase, and adenylate kinase activities in cerebral cortex, and increase in cerebellum. In case this also occurs in the patients, these results suggest that oxidative stress and alteration of the phosphoryltransfer network may be involved in the pathophysiology of β-alaninemia. Moreover, the ingestion of β-alanine to improve muscular performance deserves more attention in respect to possible side-effects.

PMID: 23620342

#2 zorba990

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 05:20 PM

For starters that seems to work out to 20 ? grams a day for a 70kg human. And that would be injected. Also most supplement Taurine with it which may have the opposite effect.
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#3 Fredrik

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 05:46 PM

I used the HED (human equivalent dose) and got 3.36 grams for a 70 kg man. About the dose that beta-alanine manufacturers recommend (from 3-6 g daily).


0.3 mg per GRAM of rat bodyweight X 0.16 = 0.048 mg/g = 48 mg/kg of rat = 3 360 mg for a 70 kg man

But I´m not claiming beta-alanine is bad for humans to supplement with. I don´t know if it is.

#4 Galaxyshock

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 10:49 AM

The difference between human oral consumption and injecting the stuff straight into rat brain
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#5 Hebbeh

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 12:03 PM

It wasn't injected into the brain. It was a peritineal injection. Common procedure in research to avoid gavage which comes with it's own problems.
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#6 Fredrik

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 12:09 PM

The difference between human oral consumption and injecting the stuff straight into rat brain


I don´t know about you but I will stop injecting ANY substances straight into my brain from now on. It just doesn´t feel safe anymore.

And yeah, what Hebbeh said.

But seriously, I think keeping an eye on reports like this is a good thing. When more side effects get known we can make a decision on the risk/benefit of supplementing with that particular substance.

Edited by Fredrik, 01 May 2013 - 12:16 PM.

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#7 mikeinnaples

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Posted 07 May 2013 - 07:45 PM

Curious that there hasn't been much discussion on this given how many people in the community supplement it.

#8 Methos000

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Posted 07 May 2013 - 08:02 PM

The difference between human oral consumption and injecting the stuff straight into rat brain


I don´t know about you but I will stop injecting ANY substances straight into my brain from now on. It just doesn´t feel safe anymore.


Yeah, they're always draining all the pleasure out of the simple joys in life, dammit! Who knew?!

Edited by Methos000, 07 May 2013 - 08:52 PM.


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#9 Slobec

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Posted 18 January 2022 - 10:55 AM

Beta alanine compete with taurine to enter cells, may be that's the reason for increased oxidation? 







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