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Acoustic Neuroma Recommendations

acoustic neuroma benign

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7 replies to this topic

#1 dangio

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 12:53 AM


Hi everyone,

My mom was recently diganosed with acoustic neuroma, described by the doctor as a benign slow growing tumor inside the brain affecting mostly hearing. So far there's only the tinnitius condition with no other issues so the doctor prescribed a wait and see approach with regular MRI's. In later stages the option would be surgery which would cause deafness in that ear.

After doing some research, it was pretty disappointing to find that there wasn't much information on how to arrest the growth of a benign tumor. So far, I've put her on the curcumin and reservatrol for their anti angiogenesis properties in the hopes that it would contain the the issue.

So reaching out to those for knowledgeable members, is there anything else that would help stunt or control benign tumor growth and help with this said condition?

Any comments or suggestions are greatly appreciated, I know that this is a rare condition.

Thanks.

#2 Bion Alex Howard

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 01:02 AM

Anti-angiogenesis is a good idea for cancer. Also, you may want to look into ways to boost her immune system, as it plays a key role in killing cancer cells. I would avoid using amino acid supplements for this purpose because of the potential to feed the tumor, but perhaps vitamin D would be a good starting point. Some people think that ketogenic diets are effective for cancer because they starve tumors of sugar, but I'd hold off on something so drastic for a benign/slow growing tumor. I'd discuss with the doc your goal to shrink or stabilize its growth using drugs/supplements in order to save her hearing, and explain to him the compounds & mechanisms you're considering. His input and expertise are really vital; don't do it behind his back.

You might want to avoid huge doses of antioxidants because they prevent oxidation. While antioxidants can be a good thing when you *don't* have cancer (although they take decades to become large enough to notice!) because they reduce DNA damage, they might also prevent cancer cells under oxidative stress from dying, which is the opposite of what we want.

Finally, you might research "tumor treating fields" which are non-invasive and use electric fields. However, since they work by damaging cells during mitosis, the effect of the treatment is proportional to the growth rate of the tumor...and since it's an acoustic neuroma, that's probably not very fast. This isn't a treatment that's really widely available right now, so for now it's just something to look into and follow in case her neuroma is still a problem years from now if FDA approval goes through.

Random non-supplement related: tell her to try simplynoise.com for the tinnitus.

Disclaimer: not a doctor yet, and I think her current doc is doing the right thing in watchful waiting.

Good luck!

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#3 tham

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 08:52 AM

Anti-angiogenesis is a good idea for cancer.



An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor.

#4 tham

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 09:36 AM

When my tinnitus first started in December 1975 at the age of 17, the first thing
I looked up in the local library was acoustic neuromas. However, that wasn't
the cause in my case.


Acoustic neuromas, also called vestibular schwannomas, can occur by
themselves, i.e. sporadically, or in association with NF1 and NF2.


http://en.wikipedia....ular_schwannoma



Surgery should be considered only as a last resort, because it frequently results
in even greater disability thereafter. All three Malaysian girls here with NF2 -
Lim Pei Lee, Yvonne Foong and Kesha Petrus - went totally deaf after surgery
to remove their acoustic neuromas.


http://www.longecity...and-treatments/


.

#5 tham

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 10:25 AM

It appears that at least part of the same cellular signallying cascade involved in
NF2-related scwannomas - merlin, IGF-1R, EGFR, ErbB 2/3, Erk, Akt, PI3K - are also
critical in the growth of sporadic acoustic neuromas.

Thus the same drugs and supplements effective for NF2 tumors should also be
useful for sporadic neuromas :


Tyrosine kinase inhibitors - erlotinib, lapatinib, sorafenib
VEGF inhibitor - bevacizumab

Sodium valproate
Celecoxib
Curcumin
Bio 30 oil (CAPE)
Quercetin
Pterostilbene
Resveratrol



Treatment of vestibular schwannoma cells with ErbB inhibitors.

" Erlotinib inhibited schwannoma cell proliferation with an IC50 value of 2.5 µmol/L,
whereas Lapatinib was less potent for growth inhibition. Erlotinib treatment
resulted in a decrease of multiple phospho-ErbB receptors in schwannoma cells. "

http://www.ncbi.nlm....cles/PMC3522123


ErbB/HER receptor activation and preclinical efficacy of lapatinib in vestibular schwannoma.

" .... EGFR family receptor activation is a consistent feature of both sporadic
and NF2-related VS. Molecular targeted therapy with lapatinib downregulates
survivin and has antiproliferative activity in a preclinical VS model. '



The role of insulin-like growth factors signaling in merlin-deficient human schwannomas.

" Loss of the tumor suppressor merlin causes development of the tumors
of the nervous system, such as schwannomas, meningiomas, and
ependymomas occurring spontaneously or as part of a hereditary
disease Neurofibromatosis Type 2. "

" ..... insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) is strongly overexpressed
and activated in human primary schwannoma cells. "

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/22821509

#6 Bion Alex Howard

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 05:47 PM

Ah, i said cancer as a broad umbrella term...i should have said neoplasia, but I didn't want to get too technical.

The tyrosine kinase inhibitors are a good thing to investigate! If it's possible to get a biopsy, there are genetic tests that might indicate specific inhibitors.

#7 tham

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 10:03 PM

Missing Medline link for the study above.

ErbB/HER receptor activation and preclinical efficacy of
lapatinib in vestibular schwannoma.



http://neuro-oncolog...t/12/8/834.long

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#8 DaveX

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Posted 18 May 2021 - 07:41 PM

That sounds pretty good:
"Artesunate induces necrotic cell death in schwannoma cells"
https://www.nature.c...es/cddis2014434

 

That also sounds like bad news for schwannoma:

"Ginsenoside Rh2 induces DNA damage and autophagy in vestibular schwannoma is dependent of LAMP2 transcriptional suppression"
"Upregulation of microRNA 344a-3p is involved in curcumin induced apoptosis in RT4 schwannoma cells"

 


Edited by DaveX, 18 May 2021 - 07:54 PM.

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