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Hesperidin's effects on the KOR...

kor kappa opioid hesperidin antagonist

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#1 Doktor

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 12:58 PM


Hi all,

So after reading SocialPirahnna's JDTic group buy thread, I noticed talk of Hesperidin being used in place of JDTic for it's action on the Kappa receptor because of how much cheaper it is. Naturally, when I heard that you can dose this by eating lemon peels, I was sceptical at best... I am now 100% certain that it has a significant effect on the Kappa receptors.

For the past month or so I have been trying to quit using opiates; I have been weaning my dosage down for weeks. Yesterday I took some morphine around 3 oclock, and was still pretty sedated when I took the Hesperidin around 5. From reading the thread, I expected that the Hesperidin would put me to sleep (one full lemon peel). This - however - was not the case at all.

Within an hour of eating the lemon peel, all my sedation was gone, and I was suddenly in a very good mood, light on my feet, and everything around me felt more lucid then I remember in quite a while. In short, it seems that the Hesperidin antagonized my Kappa receptors (removing all the sedation of the morphine in my bloodstream), and actually provided me with a potent energizing and anti-depressant effect.

I thought Hesperidin was supposed to be an Agonist for KOR?? :S Can partial weak agonists in small doses act like antagonists or something? This was a fairly profound effect. Could this have been from other chemicals in the lemon peel? Thanks.

#2 lammas2

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 04:17 PM

Lemon peel contains a lot of lemon essential oil, which primarily consists of pinene (AChE inhibitor) and limonene (5HT1A agonist, also causes oxytocin release). I doubt that the effects you got were due to hesperidin.

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#3 socialpiranha

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 09:24 AM

I would tend to agree with the lamma but its all guess work here, There is added hesperidin in my chewable vitamin c and i don't notice anything other than a slight dysphoric effect, there's a good chance it's the limonene causing the effects you mentioned, i was hoping myself that maybe an agonist at small doses would downregulate kappa receptors or stimulate endogenous antagonist production or something maybe thats whats happening?

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#4 lammas2

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 09:27 AM

You could also try eating menthol (peppermint oil), it's a weak kappa opioid receptor agonist.

#5 socialpiranha

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 04:22 PM

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S000689931200193X

#6 Synaptik

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Posted 21 November 2016 - 09:57 PM

Is Hesperidin a kappa opioid agonist or antagonist? The PubMed research seems to indicate antidepressant effects in rat FST (indicating antagonism) but elsewhere some say agonist. Any definitive information as too which it is and how potent?



#7 jacobjerondin

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Posted 18 June 2019 - 11:30 PM

Bump, anyone have any answers about this? Hesperidin is super easy to get online so I'd love an answer to this, I have a bag from bulk supplements and think it made me feel pretty dysphoric when I tried twice the recommended dose but I tend to feel dysphoric most of the time since developing anhedonia so it's hard to say for sure.

 

I know a guy named sativa on this forum said that it worked as a kappa opioid agonist, I don't think he mentioned whether it would be good anhedonia in the long run which is what we all care about.



#8 Junipersun

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Posted 19 June 2019 - 04:02 PM

Bump, anyone have any answers about this? Hesperidin is super easy to get online so I'd love an answer to this, I have a bag from bulk supplements and think it made me feel pretty dysphoric when I tried twice the recommended dose but I tend to feel dysphoric most of the time since developing anhedonia so it's hard to say for sure.

 

I know a guy named sativa on this forum said that it worked as a kappa opioid agonist, I don't think he mentioned whether it would be good anhedonia in the long run which is what we all care about.

 

if it is indeed a kappa agonist, you have to take it at night in order to not feel the dysphoric effects. Over time, your kappa receptor should downregulate and leave you with a feeling similar to a kor antagonist.



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#9 jacobjerondin

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Posted 19 June 2019 - 10:51 PM

Yeah I understand the thinking behind using hesperidin, was just hoping someone else might have tried it. Does anyone know whether it's water soluble and thus best taken on an empty stomach or fat soluble and thus best taken with a meal? I'm come across conflicting recommendations on hesperidin products.

 

Also, given that I'm already struggling with insomnia, I doubt taking this stuff at night would be a good idea for me. I'm just going to take it during the day and tough out the dysphoric effects because I know it should help me in the long run.



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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: kor, kappa, opioid, hesperidin, antagonist

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