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#121 niner

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Posted 18 December 2016 - 09:14 PM

Competition is a good thing.  IDK why everyone has to hump SENS/Aubrey.  Even if Calico ends up being spectacularly wrong, I'd rather see differentiated efforts than a single (SENS-only) approach.

 

I think it would be a lot better if even ten percent of Calico's resources were spent on something more likely to produce real cures for aging.  Calico is essentially the same old same old, so it's not like they're adding much valuable diversity to the overall research effort.


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#122 Avatar of Horus

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Posted 19 December 2016 - 09:33 AM

Will to cure aging is the most important thing and that's what Calico lacks.

 

This is the main reason why I support SENS, not because their research is superior to others but because they are truly determined to cure aging and will go to the end.

 

Here is Calico's mission from their front webpage:
https://www.calicolabs.com/

 

We’re tackling aging,
one of life’s greatest mysteries.

Calico is a research and development company whose mission is to harness advanced technologies to increase our understanding of the biology that controls lifespan. We will use that knowledge to devise interventions that enable people to lead longer and healthier lives. Executing on this mission will require an unprecedented level of interdisciplinary effort and a long-term focus for which funding is already in place.

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#123 PeaceAndProsperity

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Posted 19 December 2016 - 11:36 AM

Isn't it odd that a 74 year old chief scientist at one of the richest companies in the world involved in a "moonshot" and given "a handsome sum of money" is still so worried about aging yeast cells? With all that money and all that talent around him, why isn't he worried about his own aging body, and the aging bodies of his now 60 years old aging students, and the aging bodies of humans?

Methinks he is already getting anti-aging treatment. He looks seriously good and young for his age, much better than Bill Gates who is over 10 years younger than him while Bill Gates paradoxically looks 10-20 years older.

A lot of US politicians and presidents are degenerating and look horrible for their age (Bush family, fx.). I think this guy has to have some costly special treatment plan that is keeping him young looking, otherwise he shouldn't look better for his age than the other people.


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#124 niner

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Posted 19 December 2016 - 08:27 PM

 

Isn't it odd that a 74 year old chief scientist at one of the richest companies in the world involved in a "moonshot" and given "a handsome sum of money" is still so worried about aging yeast cells? With all that money and all that talent around him, why isn't he worried about his own aging body, and the aging bodies of his now 60 years old aging students, and the aging bodies of humans?

Methinks he is already getting anti-aging treatment. He looks seriously good and young for his age, much better than Bill Gates who is over 10 years younger than him while Bill Gates paradoxically looks 10-20 years older.

A lot of US politicians and presidents are degenerating and look horrible for their age (Bush family, fx.). I think this guy has to have some costly special treatment plan that is keeping him young looking, otherwise he shouldn't look better for his age than the other people.

 

I suspect that he has a good set of hair/skin genes, and not much more than that.  He'll probably be dead before Calico has anything that will make a difference for him.


Edited by niner, 19 December 2016 - 08:28 PM.

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#125 Darryl

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Posted 22 December 2016 - 02:38 PM

The literature emerging from Calico offers some indication of where they're at. At the moment the only publically released research that lists affiliation with Calico Life Sciences is better funded work from C. Kenyon's worm lab, and some reviews catching up with the methionine restriction fans hereabouts.

 

Research:

Bensaddek et al, 2016. Micro‐proteomics with iterative data analysis: Proteome analysis in C. elegans at the single worm levelProteomics16(3), pp.381-392.

Roux et al, 2016. Reversible age-related phenotypes induced during larval quiescence in C. elegansCell Metabolism23(6), pp.1113-1126.

Narayan et al, 2016. Deep proteome analysis identifies age-related processes in C. elegansCell Systems3(2), pp.144-159.

 

Reviews:

McIsaac, 2016. From yeast to human: exploring the comparative biology of methionine restriction in extending eukaryotic life spanAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences1363(1), pp.155-170.

Brown-Borg and Buffenstein, 2016. Cutting back on the essentials: Can manipulating intake of specific amino acids modulate health and lifespan?Ageing Research Reviews.

 


Edited by Darryl, 22 December 2016 - 02:38 PM.

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#126 sthira

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Posted 22 December 2016 - 07:58 PM

Evidently, Calico also co-funded this (human) trial for blood transfusions, and we see the Conboys are involved:

A single heterochronic blood exchange reveals rapid inhibition of multiple tissues by old blood. Justin Rebo, Melod Mehdipour, Ranveer Gathwala, Keith Causey, Yan Liu, Michael J. Conboy & Irina M. Conboy
Nature Communications 7, Article number: 13363 (2016)
doi:10.1038/ncomms13363

Edited by sthira, 22 December 2016 - 07:59 PM.


#127 alc

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Posted 24 December 2016 - 03:14 PM

 

Calico has access to a lot of data in this field (thanks to Google's search engine that dominates the net).

 

980.gif

 

 

... like all the sens trolls you are in the same bracket: ignorance is bliss ... rather than do a search to find out about how Calico Labs work (or at least for Daphne Koller their CCO ...) you spend time on posting clips ... no wonder you do not understand much of what is going on in the research field ... let's revisit this post after Calico Labs moves on, and we will see how many of you pooh-pooh-ers/sens trolls will still laugh ...


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#128 Antonio2014

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 04:47 PM

Evidently, Calico also co-funded this (human) trial for blood transfusions, and we see the Conboys are involved:

A single heterochronic blood exchange reveals rapid inhibition of multiple tissues by old blood. Justin Rebo, Melod Mehdipour, Ranveer Gathwala, Keith Causey, Yan Liu, Michael J. Conboy & Irina M. Conboy
Nature Communications 7, Article number: 13363 (2016)
doi:10.1038/ncomms13363

 

One of the authors is part of the staff of SENS RF. Anyway, the experiments in that paper were done in mice, not humans. Maybe you are citing the wrong paper?
 


Edited by Antonio2014, 26 December 2016 - 04:53 PM.


#129 reason

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Posted 27 March 2017 - 11:15 AM

For those who like reading the Calico tea leaves, here are a few details on one of their recent partnerships. Calico, the California Life Company, is the aging research venture funded by Google. It launched a few years back, but so far those involved appear to be doing nothing particularly radical, insofar as we know anything about what is going on there. Calico is certainly not supporting the SENS view of damage repair as the best way to treat aging, and may well be turn out to be simply a larger and more secretive version of the Ellison Medical Foundation in the end: an expansion of the largely investigative work already taking place at the NIA, undertaking no projects with the potential to make a large difference to the course of aging in humans. More research is always better than less research, of course, but nonetheless this has grown to have the look of another missed opportunity to add to the recent history of aging research.

Here, Calico is partnering to obtain access to a technology that could be turned to ways to adjust the level of any one or any few of the proteins present in a cell. The approach works by harnessing one of the cell's established recycling mechanisms. This might be intended as an alternative to methods such as RNA interference for use in adjusting cellular operation. The goal is to tinker with the switches and dials of metabolism, all of which are influenced or determined by levels of specific proteins, in order to test approaches that might slightly slow aging by reducing the pace at which damage accumulates. More positively, it might be turned to degrading forms of metabolic waste that cause aging, though beyond amyloid and Alzheimer's disease, there is little sign that Calico researchers are interested in the list of waste compounds outlined in the SENS rejuvenation research proposals, such as cross-links, lipofusin, and so forth.

C4 Therapeutics (C4T) and Calico today announced a five-year collaboration to discover, develop, and commercialize therapies for treating diseases of aging, including cancer. Under the terms of the agreement, the parties will leverage C4T's expertise and capabilities in targeted protein degradation to jointly discover and advance small molecule protein degraders as therapeutic agents to remove certain disease-causing proteins. The partnership will pursue preclinical research and Calico will be responsible for subsequent clinical development and commercialization of resulting products that may emerge from the collaboration.

"We know from decades of translational research that it can be incredibly challenging to find effective pharmacologic inhibitors of many of the biologically well-validated targets, particularly in cancer. Through the alternative strategy of specifically targeting such proteins for degradation, we believe we have the opportunity to identify promising new therapeutics in cancer and in other diseases as well. We're looking forward to collaborating with C4T's scientists and applying their protein degradation technology to the discovery and development of effective new treatments."

C4 Therapeutics is a private biotechnology company developing a new class of drugs based on Targeted Protein Degradation (TPD) to address a broad range of life-threatening and life-impairing diseases. C4T's platform uses small molecule drugs to direct the machinery of the ubiquitin-proteasome system to selectively degrade disease-relevant proteins for therapeutic benefit. This distinctive mechanism provides new opportunities to target traditionally difficult-to-treat diseases and diseases plagued by drug resistance.

Link: http://www.calicolab...ews/2017/03/23/


View the full article at FightAging

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#130 alc

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Posted 27 March 2017 - 09:41 PM

"SENS view of damage repair as the best way to treat aging" ... says who? fa guy/girl ... let's be serious here ... sens has many issues understanding lots of things ... one simple example:

 

"CohBar, Inc. Continues Exploration of Mitochondrial Genome and Expansion of Its IP Portfolio with Filing of 29 New Provisional Patents"

 http://www.pharmiweb...V#ixzz4cZ4NChaO

 

[btw: this is coming from a team that has David Sinclair in, the one that fa guy/girl is trying to pooh-pooh for years ... bummer:

 

http://cohbar.com/ty...-and-advisors/]

 

 

 

... now from claiming that what they do is the best way to treat aging, to reality ... there is a long way ...


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#131 Junk Master

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Posted 27 April 2017 - 05:19 PM

Vox had an intriguing article about the culture of secrecy at Calico, Google's 1.5 billion dollar, anti-aging project:

 

http://www.vox.com/s...tality-research

 

I'm curious if anyone here knows what paths they are exploring.   I'd say, given Google's data crunching prowess, genomic medicine seems a perfect fit; but, they are throwing as much money as the NIH into this, so that's incredibly exciting.

 

I just hope they rethink what seems to be their "culture of secrecy."



#132 reason

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Posted 27 April 2017 - 11:33 PM

It will not be news to this audience that the California Life Company, or Calico for short, Google's venture into aging research, is secretive. Outside of the staff, few people can do more than read the tea leaves regarding what exactly they are up to. The high level summary is that Google is channeling a large amount of funding into some sort of long-term development plan for therapeutics to treat aging as a medical condition. Over the past few years Calico has made sizable development deals with pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, and hired some of the most noteworthy names in the aging research community. It is usual for biotechnology and drug development companies to be fairly secretive in their early stages, for reasons that largely relate to investment regulations. At some point they have to talk about what they are doing, however, given that the goal is clinical trials, customers, and revenue.

Google is super secretive about its anti-aging research. No one knows why.

In 2013, Time magazine ran a cover story titled Google vs. Death about Calico, a then-new Google-run health venture focused on understanding aging - and how to beat it. "We should shoot for the things that are really, really important, so 10 or 20 years from now we have those things done," Google CEO Larry Page told Time. But how exactly would Calico help humans live longer, healthier lives? How would it invest its vast $1.5 billion pool of money? Beyond sharing the company's ambitious mission - to better understand the biology of aging and treat aging as a disease - Page was vague. I recently started poking around in Silicon Valley and talking to researchers who study aging and mortality, and discovered that four years after its launch, we still don't know what Calico is doing.

I asked everyone I could about Calico and what it's up to - and quickly learned that it's an impenetrable fortress. Among the little more than a dozen press releases Calico has put out, there were only broad descriptions of collaborations with outside labs and pharmaceutical companies - most of them focused on that overwhelmingly vague mission of researching aging and associated diseases. The media contacts there didn't so much as respond to multiple requests for interviews. People who work at Calico, Calico's outside collaborators, and even folks who were no longer with the company, stonewalled me. There were no clinical trials or patents filed publicly under the Calico brand that I could find and only a few aging-related scientific papers.

It may be the case that Calico is simply following the standard biotechnology startup game plan over a longer time frame and with more funding than is usually the case, including the secrecy portion of that plan, but by now most of those interested in faster progress and beneficial upheaval in the research community have written off Calico as a venture unlikely to make any meaningful difference. Given who has been hired to lead it, and given the deals made, the most likely scenario is that Calico is the second coming of the Ellison Medical Foundation. By that I mean an organization that is essentially running more of the same research funded at the National Institute on Aging, with a poor or absent focus on clinical translation, and constrained in goals to the paradigm of drug development to slightly slow the progression of aging. In this area you will find things like calorie restriction mimetics, pharmaceutical enhancement of autophagy, and so forth. The past twenty years of research have made it clear that it is very hard and very expensive to produce even marginally effective and reliable drugs capable of slowing aging. Yet this is exactly what most research groups continue to try.

There is an alternative approach. Instead of altering the poorly understood intersection between metabolism and aging in an attempt to slow the damage of aging, instead periodically repair the quite well cataloged list of fundamental cell and tissue damage that causes aging. This approach is exemplified by senescent cell clearance - a way to extend healthy life and turn back symptoms of aging and age-related disease that is already showing itself more robust and useful than any of the present drug candidates aimed at altering the operation of metabolism to slow aging. Senescent cell clearance as a way to reverse aging has been pushed by the SENS rejuvenation research advocates for more than 15 years, with good evidence as support. Yet over that span of time the majority of the research community rejected damage repair in favor of focusing on efforts to slow aging, efforts that have not succeeded in producing useful therapeutics with sizable results on human health.

That rejection was clearly not sound. Once efforts started in earnest on development of methods of senescent cell clearance, it required only the past few years to robustly demonstrate its effectiveness as a rejuvenation therapy. It is gathering ever more attention now - but not from Calico, so far as we know, and not from the majority of the research community that continues to work on slowing aging through adjustment of metabolism, an approach to aging as a medical condition that is demonstrably marginal and expensive. The funding used to bring senescent cell clearance up to its present point of proven success is a tiny fraction of what has been spent on so far futile efforts to produce calorie restriction mimetic drugs that would, even if realized, be far less effective and far less useful to patients. On the whole I think Calico is most likely a larger than usual example of the primary problem in aging research: the dominance of initiatives that put their funds towards complex, lengthy, and uncertain projects that even in the best of circumstances are only capable of producing poor outcomes for patients. In short, the problem is an unwillingness to pursue the repair and rejuvenation approach that is demonstrably more effective than the adjusting metabolism to slow aging approach. Excessive secrecy is a minor quibble in comparison.


View the full article at FightAging
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#133 YOLF

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Posted 30 April 2017 - 04:32 PM

There are many solutions. Calico is positioning itself to have control over which ones get tested and what it will mean for the future of the advertising agency. They obviously don't want to delete any genes that lead to clicking behavior which they make money off of. Any disease associated with that will cut off other revenue streams and must be inhibited... at least that's my guess as to what they're doing.



#134 alc

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Posted 30 April 2017 - 07:16 PM

 The elephant keeps walking (Calico) as the dogs (Sens, FightAging, etc.) keep barking.



#135 Nate-2004

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 03:07 PM

I'm inclined to agree with the SENS approach since it appears that Calico is trying to tackle aging and does not seem even remotely aware of the SENS approach or that the mechanisms of aging are well known by now. It's like they're reinventing the wheel, which is fine, but not helpful as far as progress goes. Sure, competition is great, I love competition, but they appear to be going after drugs that treat existing age related diseases rather than going upstream. It's more profitable that way. The healthcare industry thrives on age and this is why tackling aging directly means the demand on healthcare, supply and demand being one of the biggest reasons why it's expensive, is one of the first problems to be resolved.


Edited by Nate-2004, 31 July 2017 - 03:08 PM.

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#136 Mind

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Posted 18 October 2019 - 11:51 AM

Ray Kurzweil (Google) was at RAADfest claiming that we now have enough computational capability to solve almost any problem human society has "within a few days".

 

Calico continues to spend hundreds of millions of dollars per year screening DNA and other cellular machinery for patterns involved in aging. After 4 years, I am still unaware of any concrete translational efforts. I know they have partnered with big-pharma, but they are very secretive about it. The best thing they have produced thus far is this (IMO): https://elifescience.../articles/47362

 

In contrast, the SENS platform is expanding, fostering numerous companies/start-ups, producing more human and animal trials every year, etc...

 

Maybe Calico with discover some holy grail of aging very soon. So far, they haven't contributed that much, especially considering the truly MASSIVE funding they have.

 

 



#137 Kentavr

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Posted 18 October 2019 - 02:56 PM

Ray Kurzweil (Google) was at RAADfest claiming that we now have enough computational capability to solve almost any problem human society has "within a few days".

Calico continues to spend hundreds of millions of dollars per year screening DNA and other cellular machinery for patterns involved in aging. After 4 years, I am still unaware of any concrete translational efforts. I know they have partnered with big-pharma, but they are very secretive about it. The best thing they have produced thus far is this (IMO): https://elifescience.../articles/47362

In contrast, the SENS platform is expanding, fostering numerous companies/start-ups, producing more human and animal trials every year, etc...

Maybe Calico with discover some holy grail of aging very soon. So far, they haven't contributed that much, especially considering the truly MASSIVE funding they have.


Calico Plan - Patent. If they find something universal and simple, they may not make it public, since it will be unprofitable for them.

P.S .: Google’s motto “Don't be evil” was removed in 2018 from its code of conduct.
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#138 orion22

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Posted 19 October 2019 - 09:40 AM

so there is no way you can invest just in calico?



#139 YOLF

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Posted 19 October 2019 - 07:30 PM

You can invest in something CaLiCo might buy some day...



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#140 Kalliste

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Posted 14 November 2019 - 09:19 AM

Ray Kurzweil (Google) was at RAADfest claiming that we now have enough computational capability to solve almost any problem human society has "within a few days".

 

Calico continues to spend hundreds of millions of dollars per year screening DNA and other cellular machinery for patterns involved in aging. After 4 years, I am still unaware of any concrete translational efforts. I know they have partnered with big-pharma, but they are very secretive about it. The best thing they have produced thus far is this (IMO): https://elifescience.../articles/47362

 

In contrast, the SENS platform is expanding, fostering numerous companies/start-ups, producing more human and animal trials every year, etc...

 

Maybe Calico with discover some holy grail of aging very soon. So far, they haven't contributed that much, especially considering the truly MASSIVE funding they have.

 

Reason right about Calico being a disappointment. I also suspect the vested Google interest in Calico partially motivated Google to ruin their search engine for alt medicine. 







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: calico, google, aging, cynthia kenyon, longevity

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