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The anti-aging diet: raw fruit and animal products

diet evolution

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#1 Plasmax

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 12:57 AM


The theory of my diet is as follows: unlike animals which can fight or flee to avoid being eaten, plants can't and so have to rely on chemical defenses (toxicants) instead so as to avoid being totally wiped out. Any plant that was as edible as an animal would be extinct (whence why carnivores that have to chase down and kill exist (because they have superior health and thus physical advantages from not eating plants). By eatiing plants you are fighting evolution!
Examples of some toxicants in plants include:
•Cytotoxins - stilbenoids in peanuts
•Mutagens - [6]-gingerol
•Carcinogens - safrole in cocoa
•Enzyme inhibitors:
-Cholinesterase inhibitors - in potatoes
-Protease inhibitors - in raw soybeans
-Amylase inhibitors - in wheat flour
•Tannins - in tea, coffee and cocoa
•Cyanogenic glycosides - in cassava
•Goitrogens (glucosinolates) - in Brassica species: cabbage, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, etc.
•Lathyrogens - in chick peas and vetch
•Pyrrolizidine alkaloids - in crops contaminated with weeds
•Antivitamins - although not toxic per se, the anti-vitamins can cause problems as a result of their interference with the function or absorption of essential nutrients
•Anti-thiamin compounds - in mung beans, rice bran, beets, Brussel sprouts

Fruit-animal symbiotic relationship:
Fruit is meant to be eaten - the plants have evolved a mutually beneficial relationship with animals whereby animals spread their seeds in return for nutrition. This shouldn't be confused with eating plants which is mutually destructive.

Raw vs cooked vs frozen vs dried:
•Raw is best. The food is in it's natural state and thus retains all it's nutrients and it doesn't have any of the toxic substances associated with cooking.
•Frozen is second best. Look for snap frozen. Frozen foods retain nearly all of the nutritional value of raw food and don't have any of the toxic substances associated with cooking.
•Dried is third best or second worst. While dried foods retain many of the nutritional qualities of raw food they are typically heated to about 60 degrees in the drying process and thus lose some of the vitamin c content. Additionally they should be reconstituted before eating with purified water.
•Cooked is worse:
Cooking produces many toxic sssubstances.
Heterocyclic amines including bbbeta-carboline
Isoquinolines
Imidazoquinolines
Imidaziquinoxalines
Transfats

Potential harmful effects of cooked foods and cooking:

Several studies published since 1990 indicate that cooking muscle meat creates heterocyclic amines (HCAs), which are also components of cigarette smoke and car exhaust fumes. High rates of HCA can cause cancer in animals. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute found that human subjects who ate beef rare or medium-rare had less than one third the risk of stomach cancer than those who ate beef medium-well or well-done.
Microwaving has been shown to reduce vitamin B12 levels in beef, pork and milk by 30-40%
Nitrosamines, formed by cooking and preserving in salt and smoking, have been noted as being carcinogenic, being linked to colon cancer and stomach-cancer.
Cooking also creates certain heat-created toxins, advanced glycation end products, otherwise known as AGEs. This reaction occurs both within the body and external to the body. Many cells in the body (for example endothelial cells, smooth muscle or cells of the immune system) from tissue such as lung, liver, kidney or peripheral blood bear the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) that, when binding AGEs, contributes to age and diabetes-related chronic inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis, renal failure, arthritis, myocardial infarction, macular degeneration, cardiovascular disease, nephropathy, retinopathy, or neuropathy. Excretion of dietary AGEs is reduced in diabetics and lowering AGE intake may greatly reduce the impact of AGEs in diabetic patients and possibly improve prognosis.
One study, comparing the effects of consuming either pasteurized, or homogenized/pasteurized, or unpasteurized milk, showed that pasteurized and homogenized/pasteurized milk might have an increased ability to evoke allergic reactions in patients allergic to milk.
Also, toxic compounds called PAHs, or Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, are formed by cooking, in addition to being a component of cigarette-smoke and car-exhaust fumes. They are known to be carcinogenic and an industrial pollutant.
Acrylamide, a toxin found in roasted/baked/fried/grilled starchy foods, but not in boiled or raw foods, has been linked to endometrial and ovarian cancers.Ingested acrylamide is metabolised to a chemically reactive epoxide, glycidamide. The HEATOX(Heat Generated Food Toxins) project has published a report on acrylamide.
Frying chickpeas, oven-heating winged beans, or roasting cereals at 200–280 degrees C reduces protein digestibility.
Another study has shown that meat heated for 10 minutes at 130 °C, showed a 1.5% decrease in protein digestibility. Similar heating of hake meat in the presence of potato starch, soy oil, and salt caused a 6% decrease in amino acid content.
There are various scientific reports, such as one by the Nutrition Society, which describe in detail the loss of vitamins and minerals caused by cooking.
It has also been suggested that cooking food in a wood-burning stove may contribute to global warming.

Longevity

Japanese people have the longest life expectancy and had the second oldest supercentenarian. They eat lots of fish and other seafood. Vegetarianism there is virtually unheard of.
Out of more than 60000 centenarians in the United States, 9000 in the United Kingdom and 3000 in Australia only 2 were verified vegans and vegetarians in general accounted for a great minority. The very vast majority of centenarians and all supercentenarians consuming large quantities of meat.

Genetic basis for aging
It makes no sense for ageing to be inherited as natural selection selects for those who produce the most healthy offspring. An individual that ages and therefor dies early is unable to continue to reproduce. While women reach menopause which prevents them from reproducing men can reproduce for their entire lifespan and thus the longest possible lifespan without ageing begets the greatest potential number of offspring and thus selects for their genes in the generations that follow.
So what causes ageing?
Well what has an evolutionary vested interest in animals aging and thus having a limited lifespan? Plants do of their predators. As long lived successfully reproducing animals that eat plants pose the greatest threat to the survival of the plant, and thus animals that eat plants are aged by the plants that they eat as natural selection selects those plants that age their predators the most.
Giant trees such as giant redwoods and giant sequoias can live for many hundreds if not thousands of years so this sort of lifespan is biologically possible (and those trees don't eat plants).

So in conclusion: eat raw fruit and animal products, live long and prosper!
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#2 Adaptogen

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 02:12 AM

Are you familiar with the concept of hormesis? While many of these plants you listed are indeed stressors, they are only minimally harmful to the body. In fact, they are harmful in such small amounts, that the body actually grows stronger and healthier because of them. A perfect example of such a stressor, which is without a doubt healthy when done in appropriate amounts, is exercise.

see here for a more in-depth explanation:
http://www.anti-agin...-and-longevity/
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#3 Plasmax

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 09:45 AM

I don't agree with the concept of hormesis. These stressors accumulate damage and cause aging. As I said in my introduction in the Introduce Yourself section I was a vegan for five years and it really ruined my health (I ate nothing but plant foods). You may read more in that topic.
If you still don't believe me you can buy a packet of crystalised ginger and a packet of macadamia nuts and eat them all together and wreak havoc on your own body (the flecks in your irises should appear in the same day (assuming that you have blue eyes so that they will be noticeable), the vertical ridges in your fingernails should grow through in a couple of months).
To everyone else I advise: eat fruit and animal products only!

Regards,
Roger
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#4 Thorsten2

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 10:37 AM

I don't agree with the concept of hormesis. These stressors accumulate damage and cause aging. As I said in my introduction in the Introduce Yourself section I was a vegan for five years and it really ruined my health (I ate nothing but plant foods). You may read more in that topic.
If you still don't believe me you can buy a packet of crystalised ginger and a packet of macadamia nuts and eat them all together and wreak havoc on your own body (the flecks in your irises should appear in the same day (assuming that you have blue eyes so that they will be noticeable), the vertical ridges in your fingernails should grow through in a couple of months).
To everyone else I advise: eat fruit and animal products only!

Regards,
Roger


What animal products? Milk and cheese? Not eating cooked meat then?

Your ideas sound lovely and all, but what are you eating each day that fits in with the criteria above? Raw meat, raw milk and raw fruit? Truth is, pretty much everything is toxic to some degree for one reason or another.

Edited by Thorsten2, 27 March 2014 - 10:41 AM.

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#5 lourdaud

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 12:11 PM

Are you familiar with the concept of hormesis? While many of these plants you listed are indeed stressors, they are only minimally harmful to the body. In fact, they are harmful in such small amounts, that the body actually grows stronger and healthier because of them. A perfect example of such a stressor, which is without a doubt healthy when done in appropriate amounts, is exercise.

see here for a more in-depth explanation:
http://www.anti-agin...-and-longevity/


Might be true but the amount of toxins and exercise you can tolerate is highly individual and most people are probably better off keeping both vegetable intake and exercise at a minimum.
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#6 mustardseed41

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 03:57 PM

Veggies are goooooood....varryyy goooooooooooood for you
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#7 timar

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 04:01 PM

This theory is so naive and simplistic that for me it sounds nothing but silly (like most other utterly simplistic notions of evolutionary theory found in the Paleosphere). Evolutionary relationships between species are extremely ancient, complex, multi-faceted and genetically pleiotropic. What is a "toxin" for some species, is often an attractant for other species. Traits change their function over time, as the environment shifts: adaption does never equal adaptation! There are smooth transitions between ecological pretator-prey relationships and symbiotic relationships over time and depending on the ecological perspective you take, etc. pp. Think of cybernetics!

Here is an example for those countless ambiguities: nuts come in hard shells, presumably to protect them from being eaten, because they can only germinate if left intact. Now look at the squirrles who have evolved optimal traits to gather nuts and crack them up - much to the benefit of the nut species, because the squirrles will hoard the nuts, thereby spreading them over a wide area and of course inevitably forget a few of them, which then can germinate far away from the tree which boar them. The tree does "happily" gives away ~98% of the nuts it bears to nourish the squirrels and other animals in exchange for a few remaining seeds being spread over a wide area. There are similar relationships everywhere you look. The birds who feed on grass seeds will excrete just a few of them only half-digested and still germinable, but carried over a wide distance and packed with the very best fertilizer. Again: the grasses "happily" give away most of their abundant seeds (in fact this kind of win-win relationship is the very reason for the seeds' abundance) for the service of some remaining seeds being spread around. As our early human ancestors foraged for nuts and the seeds of wild grasses and legumes (for which we have archeological evidence in the form of starch-granule microfossils in teeth enamel of Hominina dated back as far as 200,000 years) they maintained a quite similar relationship with those species - until that relationship reached a whole new symbiotic dimension with the beginning of agriculture, of course.

Edited by timar, 27 March 2014 - 04:51 PM.

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#8 Brett Black

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 02:57 AM

Plasmax, what you've posted is speculative hypothesis.

For me, evidence(when it is available) is superior to speculative hypothesis when making important life choices, and the current best nutritional evidence(limited as it may be) is that the healthiest diet for humans is mainly composed of unrefined and whole plant-derived foods (yes that does include fruit) with minimal to no animal meat(maybe with the exception of fish.)

Edited by Brett Black, 28 March 2014 - 03:43 AM.

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#9 timar

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 08:17 AM

Adding to my above examples: of course the grass hughly benefits from being eaten altogether (not only its seeds). There is a long-standing symbiotic relationship between the grasses of the savanna and the herbivores which graze on them in large herds. In fact, grass is "designed" to be grazed off regularly. It has strong, deep roots, keeping it alive no matter how often it is cut off. On the other hand, the grasses' fiercest competitors for habitat, the young, sprouting trees don't survive a bison munching on it. The grass has co-evolved as those herbivores' perfect food, because the herbivores in return expand and protect its habitat, keeping if free from trees, keeping the forest from coming back.

As I've said, you'll find equally intricate relationships everywhere you look in Nature. This is why such naive notions as "the plant doesn't want to be eaten" are of course utterly absurd. You can never understand evolution from a single species point of view, yet alone from an individuals' point of view. Evolution is never, ever about the (alleged) interest of the individual organism (of course a plant has no intent the way an animal has) but about the interest of the species.

Edited by timar, 28 March 2014 - 08:24 AM.

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#10 tunt01

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Posted 29 March 2014 - 11:21 PM

I've made a lot of stupid assumptions over the years, so I am the pot calling the kettle black to a degree. But this is what I thought of when I read the OP comment


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#11 maximum411

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Posted 29 March 2014 - 11:46 PM

It's a nice-sounding theory, but it defies all of the available evidence. One of the few things almost all scientists agree on is that a diet based primarily in vegetables is healthiest, because people who eat these kinds of diets have the best health outcomes. The opposite is true of animal products.
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#12 Methodician

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Posted 01 May 2014 - 07:48 PM

It's a nice-sounding theory, but it defies all of the available evidence. One of the few things almost all scientists agree on is that a diet based primarily in vegetables is healthiest, because people who eat these kinds of diets have the best health outcomes. The opposite is true of animal products.

 

I believe that "scientists" have not been looking at the whole picture. In a modern industrial society "animal products" is equated with muscle meats and highly processed industrial bi-products. While I agree that animal foods should not constitute a large portion of one's diet, incorporating a wide variety of animal tissues such as skin, organs (primarily liver), connective tissues and other adipose tissue, saturated and monounsaturated fats, a bit of muscle here and there, and even dissolved bone materials is a very healthy habit.

 

Aside from that, the majority of food (by weight) should come from plants.

 

I believe that many vegetables and seeds are sub-optimal foods but that many of them are extremely beneficial. Even a little hormesis can be good in the long term. Fruit and animal products should make up a considerable portion of the human diet of course.

 

Going back to evolution, one semi-toxic food we've evolved to eat is a huge variety of USO's (Underground Storage Organs) which other animals either can't get to or can't properly digest. These, in fact, may have played a larger role in the development of large brains and large social groups than big game hunting. Consider the grandmothering hypothesis.

 

This is also an excellent example of how cooking reduces toxins, eases digestability, and increases bio-availability of nutrients. There are many plants that become far more nutritious and less toxic after cooking.


Edited by Methodician, 01 May 2014 - 07:54 PM.


#13 Phoenicis

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Posted 01 May 2014 - 08:08 PM

A little problem with the meat part - There are two pretty important life-extension pathways - methionine restriction and leucine moderation; that don't work with high meat consumption. These two pathways may in fact be responsible for some the effects of what is referred to as 'calorie restriction'. The research indicates that amino acids like leucine and methionine may be of central importance to mTOR stimulation.

 

Overall what I recommend for longevity in terms of protein ingestion, (this is in line with the recommendations we will make at Live120Plus), is to consume fairly low amounts of protein and to be particularly moderate when it comes to animal protein, because it is richer in methionine. The reasons for this recommendation are mainly because consuming moderately low amounts of protein will help in reducing mTOR levels, reducing IGF-1 levels, and reducing unnecessary protein synthesis (which increases the synthesis of erroneous proteins) by reducing methionine levels. This should be beneficial for longevity, in part by causing increased autophagy..

 

"...40% [methionine restriction] ("MetR"), differing from what happens during both 40% [dietary restriction] ("DR") and 80% MetR, does not decrease growth rate and body size of rats. All the available studies suggest that the decrease in methionine ingestion that occurs during DR is responsible for part of the aging-delaying effect of this intervention likely through the decrease of mtROSp and ensuing DNA damage that it exerts."

 

Animal Protein - Increased overall risk of mortality here (under 65s), here, here, here, here,

 

As Darryl pointed out in this thread we also know that - "Leucine moderation (and perhaps moderation of other BCAAS, as well as aromatic AAs) functions through the insulin/IGF-1/mTOR pathway. Methionine restriction, while reducing DNA methylation, and IIS/mTOR growth signalling as with other essential amino acids, may function uniquely through reductions in mitochondrial oxidative stress (much as mitochondrially targetted SOD expression, MitoQ, or membrane decoupling by DNP or C60 would)."

 

Another nice cache Darryl put together:

Darryl, on 04 Mar 2014 - 3:20 PM, said:snapback.png

We've known for 15 years that high methionine and [leucine] proteins stimulate IGF-1 signalling and cancer proliferation. The most interesting thing about this study was the bimodality of response, with protein no longer being so deletorious (at least with respect to cancer) after age 65.

I speculate that lower availability of viable stem cells for tranfsormation to cancer, and the need for some growth signalling to delay frailty and immune decline in our senior years, are at work here.

 

 

Methionine - restriction is a strategy in both cancer growth control as well as lifespan extension. Notice that 40% Restriction does not decrease growth rate and body size in rats.

Leucine - mTOR stimulation and increase IGF-1, as Darryl notes in this thread, most of us have become accustomed to eating more protein than we need. 

Darryl, on 10 Apr 2014 - 1:29 PM, said:snapback.png

 

Moderation, not restriction indeed. The World Heath Organization's leucine requirement is 39 mg/kg/day, with a considerable safety margin. That's 2.34 g for a 60 kg person, 2.73 g for a 70 kg person etc.

 

So how much leucine do Americans get?

 

percentile  leucine (g)
1st         2.3
5th         3.1
10th        3.6
25th        4.5
50th        5.8
75th        7.3
90th        8.9
95th       10.1 
99th       12.6 
mean        6.1
 
Most are getting mTOR signalling from 2-500% of their lean tissue leucine requirements, and this was before the low-carb craze.
 
The recent study indicating a biphasic response of mortality to dietary protein suggests low-protein till 65-70, followed by higher levels to prevent frailty, sarcopenia, thereafter. Perhaps a diet sufficent to keep one in the 19-22 optimum BMI.
 
Practically for those under 65, it just means sating hunger with fiber rather than hypothalamic mTOR signalling, I hope when I reach that threshold in 25 years we'll have effective myostatin inhibitors and other means to prevent the downside of mTOR moderation. 

 

 

Another useful quote  from Michael in this thread -

 

Quote

"On the CR list, Al Pater recently pointed to (1), an useful review on metabolic pathways modulated by -- and possibly involved in the anti-aging, life-extending effects of -- CR. One central focus of the paper is the mTOR pathway. There is now a great deal of converging evidence (as is dug into in much more detail in (2) (also available full-text thanks to Al)) that inhibiting mTOR plays a significant role in CR's anti-aging life extension effects -- most recently including the breakthrough report of robust life extension in mice using the rapamycin, an mTOR-inhibiting drug (3). This suggests that lowering leucine intake may enhance this mechanism of CR's effects.

Along with Calories and insulin signaling, a key regulator of mTOR is the branched-chain amino acid leucine, and there are now many reports (eg. (11-19)) that intake of either isolated leucine, or whey protein (which is unusually enriched in this and other BCAAs), enhances mTOR signaling relative to other aminos or proteins in rats and humans alike. This, in fact, is the basis for a lot of whey's popularity with bodybuilders: by activating mTOR, leucine (and to a lesser extent other branched-chain aminos) inhibits autophagic catabolism of muscle, leading to higher net muscle protein.

Of course, that same enhanced signaling inhibits the recycling of defective and damaged proteins, which is likely one of the core reasons that CR and other modes of mTOR inhibition retard aging.

Leucine is ubiquitous in protein, so one straightforward way to lower your leucine intake is to just cut your protein intake. Alternatively/additionally, because the amount of leucine per unit protein does vary quite a bit from food to food (whey protein being exceptionally high, as its vendors will enthusiastically remind you), you can look for foods low in leucine per unit protein with Nutritiondata.com's nutrient search tool.

A couple of gems from my own digging for relatively protein-rich foods low in leucine AND methionine: lentils and fava beans. A simple and tasty-sounding recipe I found for the latter:
 

Quote

Quote

Fool Medames (Egyptian Beans)
1 lb Dried sm. fava or pink beans
Lightly salted water
1/2 c Red lentils
3 tb Lemon juice
1/4 c Olive oil
1/2 ts Cumin, ground
Salt and pepper to taste
1/2 c Green onions, chopped

Sort and rinse dried beans. Place in a large saucepan and add lightly salted water to cover. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and cover. Simmer over low heat 2 1/2 hours. If necessary, add more water to keep beans covered. Add lentils and cover. Simmer 30 minutes longer or until lentils and beans are tender and mixture is thick but not soupy. Stir in lemon juice, olive oil, cumin, salt and freshly ground pepper. Serve hot, sprinkling each serving with a portion of green onions.

The same site has many other fava bean recipes, and indeed recipes for a variety of legumes.

FWIW, replacing casein with lactalbumin (~70% of the protein in whey) in AL diets doesn't seem to affect longevity in F344 rats, whereas using soy is clearly better for them (4,5); however, this may not mean much, as F344s are somewhat weird animals to work with because of their high vulnerability to nephropathy, which soy protein significantly alleviates. Lactalbumin has inconsistent (depending especially on gender) but generally favorable effects compared with commercial diets in hamsters (6,7); and it was reported to extend longevity when substituted for casein late in life in mice (8), possibly due to the presence of precursors of glutathione, during the time when age-related oxidative stress has begun to set in and recycling of GSH becomes impaired.

-Michael

1. Metabolic reprogramming, caloric restriction and aging. Anderson RM, Weindruch R. Trends Endocrinol Metab. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 20004110

2. The TOR pathway comes of age. Stanfel MN, Shamieh LS, Kaeberlein M, Kennedy BK. Biochim Biophys Acta. 2009 Jun 15. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 19539012

3. Harrison DE, Strong R, Sharp ZD, Nelson JF, Astle CM, Flurkey K, Nadon NL, Wilkinson JE, Frenkel K, Carter CS, Pahor M, Javors MA, Fernandez E, Miller RA. Rapamycin fed late in life extends lifespan in genetically heterogeneous mice. Nature. 2009 Jul 16;460(7253):392-5. Epub 2009 Jul 8. PubMed PMID: 19587680; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2786175.

4. Shimokawa I, Higami Y, Yu BP, Masoro EJ, Ikeda T. Influence of dietary components on occurrence of and mortality due to neoplasms in male F344 rats. Aging (Milano). 1996 Aug;8(4):254-62. PubMed PMID: 8904955.

5. Shimokawa I, Higami Y, Hubbard GB, McMahan CA, Masoro EJ, Yu BP. Diet and the suitability of the male Fischer 344 rat as a model for aging research. J Gerontol. 1993 Jan;48(1):B27-32. PubMed PMID: 8418135.

6. Birt DF, Schuldt GH, Salmasi S. Survival of hamsters fed graded levels of two protein sources. Lab Anim Sci. 1982 Aug;32(4):363-6. PubMed PMID: 7144109.

5. Birt DF, Baker PY, Hruza DS. Nutritional evaluations of three dietary levels of lactalbumin throughout the lifespan of two generations of Syrian hamsters. J Nutr. 1982 Nov;112(11):2151-60. PubMed PMID: 7131092.

8. Bounous G, Gervais F, Amer V, Batist G, Gold P. The influence of dietary whey protein on tissue glutathione and the diseases of aging. Clin Invest Med. 1989 Dec;12(6):343-9. PubMed PMID: 2692897.

11: Drummond MJ, Rasmussen BB. Leucine-enriched nutrients and the regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin signalling and human skeletal muscle protein synthesis. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2008 May;11(3):222-6. Review. PubMed PMID: 18403916.

12: Dreyer HC, Drummond MJ, Pennings B, Fujita S, Glynn EL, Chinkes DL, Dhanani S, Volpi E, Rasmussen BB. Leucine-enriched essential amino acid and carbohydrate ingestion following resistance exercise enhances mTOR signaling and protein synthesis in human muscle. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2008 Feb;294(2):E392-400. Epub 2007 Dec 4. PubMed PMID: 18056791; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2706121.

13: Stipanuk MH. Leucine and protein synthesis: mTOR and beyond. Nutr Rev. 2007 Mar;65(3):122-9. Review. PubMed PMID: 17425063.

14: Norton LE, Layman DK. Leucine regulates translation initiation of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle after exercise. J Nutr. 2006 Feb;136(2):533S-537S. PubMed PMID: 16424142.

15: Norton LE, Layman DK, Bunpo P, Anthony TG, Brana DV, Garlick PJ. The leucine content of a complete meal directs peak activation but not duration of skeletal muscle protein synthesis and mammalian target of rapamycin signaling in rats. J Nutr. 2009 Jun;139(6):1103-9. Epub 2009 Apr 29. PubMed PMID: 19403715.

16: Hulmi JJ, Tannerstedt J, Selänne H, Kainulainen H, Kovanen V, Mero AA. Resistance exercise with whey protein ingestion affects mTOR signaling pathway and myostatin in men. J Appl Physiol. 2009 May;106(5):1720-9. Epub 2009 Mar 19. PubMed PMID: 19299575.

17: Anthony TG, McDaniel BJ, Knoll P, Bunpo P, Paul GL, McNurlan MA. Feeding meals containing soy or whey protein after exercise stimulates protein synthesis and translation initiation in the skeletal muscle of male rats. J Nutr. 2007 Feb;137(2):357-62. PubMed PMID: 17237311.

18: Cota D, Proulx K, Smith KA, Kozma SC, Thomas G, Woods SC, Seeley RJ. Hypothalamic mTOR signaling regulates food intake. Science. 2006 May 12;312(5775):927-30. PubMed PMID: 16690869.

19: Wu P, Jiang C, Shen Q, Hu Y. Systematic gene expression profile of hypothalamus in calorie-restricted mice implicates the involvement of mTOR signaling in neuroprotective activity. Mech Ageing Dev. 2009 Sep;130(9):602-10. Epub 2009 Jul 30. PubMed PMID: 19647013."

 

 


Edited by Phoenicis, 01 May 2014 - 08:11 PM.

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#14 gamesguru

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 12:06 AM

Did it also occur to you that herbivores might respond to plant defenses by evolving their own adaptations, reverting toxins to nutrients? A species' digestive track and overall chemistry is influenced by the environment and food sources of its forefathers; in the struggle to continue its precarious existence, life either goes extinct, or it adapts itself to flourish despite adversity and scarcity. It would explain, for example, why weeds resist herbicides and bacteria resist antibiotics even turning them into energy, why theobromine, a known toxin to canines, is a suspected nutrient to humans, why different species often display huge differences in LD50s for the same chemical, and so on. Herbivores are prolific, successful and abundant; in order to hang a question mark on their security or longevity, you had better have plenty of supporting evidence. And to anyone making the claim that phytotoxins are destabilizing the human genome, look at the evidence that cooked meat destabilizes the genome. There is an aptly-named Comet Assay, measuring DNA scattering after exposure to a suspected genotoxin; cooked meat is consistently found to be genotoxic, while plants are typically genoprotective.


Edited by dasheenster, 04 May 2014 - 12:13 AM.

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#15 Furniture

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 12:09 AM

What are the "Anti-thiamin compounds - in mung beans, rice bran, beets, Brussel sprouts" that are you referring to exactly?

 

I eat a lot of beets (good source of methylfolate) and I eat mung beans & brussel sprouts occasionally and, although I don't display symptoms of a Vitamin B1 insufficiency, I would like to avoid that scenario if that is at all possible from eating the 4 foods listed above.

 


Side note: Raw egg whites contain avidin, a protein that blocks absorption of biotin, so your argument that animal products are healthiest raw at least does not cover eggs. Eggs also do not form the cancer-causing heterocyclic amines (HCA) compounds that you mentioned above, so cooking them is safe in that regard. 


Edited by Furniture, 22 September 2019 - 12:11 AM.

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