• Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log In with Google      Sign In    
  • Create Account
  LongeCity
              Advocacy & Research for Unlimited Lifespans

Photo

Dental health regimen


  • Please log in to reply
41 replies to this topic

#1 scottl

  • Guest
  • 2,177 posts
  • 2

Posted 08 October 2005 - 02:43 AM


I. Electric toothbrush;

sonic care is worthless (despite 10K dentists who like it). Don't believe me? Get some disclosing solution and see for yoourself.

I like braun/oral B 3D excel. YMMV. Check with disclosing solution.

DON'T PRESS TOO HARD

II. Mouthwashes:

listerene (etc. Alternating per lifemirage and my friend is probably a good idea to prevent developement of resistant organisms). Yes listerene has alcohol which has been linked to oral cancer. Risk/benefit. Your call for your body.

III flossing

IV waterpick with one of the mouthwashes at least once per day.

#2 Pablo M

  • Guest
  • 636 posts
  • -1
  • Location:Sacramento

Posted 08 October 2005 - 02:54 AM

sonic care is worthless

Absolutely agree. Damn expensive too. Pay 100 bucks or whatever, battery lasts for like a year, can't replace battery, buy a new SoniCare. SCAM!

I'm wondering what you think about the whole fluoride debate. I mean, I know that some is beneficial, but I have read that green tea contains a bit, and I drink a whole lot of green tea. Is there the possibility that my teeth could be getting too much if I use a fluoridated toothpaste? Too much fluoride can be just as bad as not enough. click here for pic

BTW, I drink fluoride-free water (ie filtered).

#3 ajnast4r

  • Guest, F@H
  • 3,925 posts
  • 148
  • Location:USA
  • NO

Posted 08 October 2005 - 04:18 AM

ive had my sonicare for close to 5 years and never had to replace the battery... i like it!!!

sponsored ad

  • Advert

#4 Pablo M

  • Guest
  • 636 posts
  • -1
  • Location:Sacramento

Posted 08 October 2005 - 05:10 AM

You must brush your teeth 1/5 as often as I did.
  • like x 1

#5 rfarris

  • Guest
  • 462 posts
  • 7
  • Location:32° 56' 26" 117° 01' 22"

Posted 08 October 2005 - 05:57 AM

My Sonicare died in about a year. I replaced it with a Braun, and after three years I decided I'd get a new one in case the other one died. For the last three years I've used one for a week while the other one sits in the charger and then swapping them each week. So I've had one Braun for three years and the older one for six years, and I can't tell which one is which.

-- Rick

#6 scottl

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 2,177 posts
  • 2

Posted 08 October 2005 - 10:43 AM

ive had my sonicare for close to 5 years and never had to replace the battery... i like it!!!


Get some disclosing solution and see if it is doing what it is supposed to i.e. are your teeth plaque free? In my mouth I put the sonicare right on plaque (as disclosed by the solution) and could not get it to go away.

#7 scottl

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 2,177 posts
  • 2

Posted 08 October 2005 - 10:45 AM

Dante,

I don't drink much tea and I don't worry about fluoride (the toothpastes I use do have it).

I use brita water filter which I don't think removes fluoride.

#8 icyT

  • Guest
  • 326 posts
  • 2
  • Location:Canada
  • NO

Posted 08 October 2005 - 04:35 PM

Never tried sonicare, can't remember the difference. I use electric too, and basically whatever brand my mom buys. I have a filter but I think only distillation removes fluoride, yeah.

I'm worried sick about fluoride. Always drinking it... it's a POISON afterall. I've heard that it doesn't come clean from your system without intensive detox, and damages your brain... damn.

#9 lemon

  • Guest
  • 389 posts
  • -2

Posted 08 October 2005 - 04:39 PM

One word - S-T-E-V-I-A

Bacteria love the sweet glycosides. Unfornately they have zero calories and they die of starvation. Rinse with stevia water.

#10 scottl

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 2,177 posts
  • 2

Posted 08 October 2005 - 05:51 PM

I'm worried sick about fluoride. Always drinking it... it's a POISON afterall.


Kinda like alcohol :)

#11 rfarris

  • Guest
  • 462 posts
  • 7
  • Location:32° 56' 26" 117° 01' 22"

Posted 08 October 2005 - 05:57 PM

One word - S-T-E-V-I-A
Bacteria love the sweet glycosides.  Unfornately they have zero calories and they die of starvation.  Rinse with stevia water.

So, Lemon, how do you feel about stevia? Do you use it yourself? :)

-- Rick

#12 lemon

  • Guest
  • 389 posts
  • -2

Posted 08 October 2005 - 06:00 PM

Hey Scott,

At least you get a warm buzz off alcohol. That and moderated usage of alcohol is linked to heart health. Fluoridated water just gives you fluorosis. And don't give me crap about needing it for your teeth - that's a crock of sh!t.

[thumb]
  • dislike x 1

#13 scottl

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 2,177 posts
  • 2

Posted 08 October 2005 - 06:40 PM

Hey Scott,

At least you get a warm buzz off alcohol.  That and moderated usage of alcohol is linked to heart health.  Fluoridated water just gives you fluorosis.  And don't give me crap about needing it for your teeth - that's a crock of sh!t.

[thumb]



One needs very little.

I use it in toothpaste because I find the risk benefit ratio (a concept....in little favor or it sometimes seems understanding around here) acceptable and the benefits for me worthwhile.

YMMV.

Lets see...pyritinol will destroy my liver, meat will kill me one way or another....alcohol is a toxin...fluoride....it gets very tiresome...

#14 lemon

  • Guest
  • 389 posts
  • -2

Posted 08 October 2005 - 09:49 PM

Scott,

It's not all gloom and doom. Always remember we have stevia !

:)

#15 xanadu

  • Guest
  • 1,917 posts
  • 8

Posted 08 October 2005 - 10:31 PM

What's wrong with a normal toothbrush? All the electric brushes do is save you some hand motion. Use a manual brush and get a little excercise at the same time.

As for floride, getting it in your drinking water is a bad idea. As has been said, it is a poison. Use a floride toothpaste or a floride wash. At least that way you have the option to rinse super carefully and should absorb minimal amounts. I no longer drink tap water so whatever nutty ideas my municipality might have about what they want me to drink have no effect on me.

Flossing is just as important as brushing.

I saw no one mention regular professional cleaning and checkups. That is certainly something that should be on the list. They use a vibrating ultrasonic device that gets plaque below the gum line.

#16 ajnast4r

  • Guest, F@H
  • 3,925 posts
  • 148
  • Location:USA
  • NO

Posted 08 October 2005 - 11:16 PM

what about a tongue scraper... ive been using that for a while, and i consider it an essential part of oral hygene

#17 icyT

  • Guest
  • 326 posts
  • 2
  • Location:Canada
  • NO

Posted 04 November 2005 - 02:15 PM

Hmm actually I think all this anti-fluoride stuff might be just paranoia. Quackwatch.com by Dr. Stephen Barrett illustrates how we actually need certain amounts of fluoride as nutrition and recommends supplementing it for children who don't naturally have fluoridated water...

#18 EmbraceUnity

  • Guest
  • 1,018 posts
  • 99
  • Location:USA

Posted 26 January 2009 - 12:48 AM

Yea dude, fluoride is fine. If you drink tea, you are getting tons of fluoride compared to tap water, and yet study after study will tell you that tea has only positive effects. That is why green tea is good to swish around your mouth.

Granted, if you get too much fluoride, your teeth may discolor.

Since I have noticed really good effects from LEF's toothpaste, I use that most of the time. It has no fluoride, but I get enough in my tea and water anyways. About once a week I use some Colgate just in case.

My other favorite dental hygiene product is Biotene. It has xylitol and other good stuff and is available at most major stores (walgreen's etc)
  • dislike x 1
  • Disagree x 1

#19 austen jones

  • Guest
  • 4 posts
  • 0

Posted 14 February 2009 - 12:12 PM

hi,
You must brush your teeth...
  • like x 2
  • dislike x 1

#20 JLL

  • Guest
  • 2,192 posts
  • 161

Posted 14 February 2009 - 02:04 PM

Ah... finally, the missing piece of the puzzle has been discovered.

#21 krillin

  • Guest
  • 1,516 posts
  • 59
  • Location:USA

Posted 22 March 2009 - 03:36 AM

What's wrong with a normal toothbrush?

Gum erosion. I finally succumbed to my dentist's badgering and got a Sonicare Extreme (Sonicare's teen version) two years ago. It's inexpensive and you use your own AA's, so no battery worries. (I use NiMH rechargeables.) I used one of those red tablets to verify that it removes all plaque. I freaked out after a few weeks when I saw that a band on my upper front teeth had changed color. I quickly realized that the Sonicare was removing tough stains, and that I needed to Sonicare the whole tooth, not just along the gumline. (I was using a manual brush too for non-gumline cleaning.) Those teeth became monochromatic soon thereafter.

Recently I've adopted a modified Zellies regimen.

Floss
Closys raises pH so that brushing won't damage teeth, is an antiseptic, and is a surfactant to remove debris.
Sonicare all but chewing surfaces with old-school Crest
Manually brush chewing surfaces with old-school Crest
Proxabrush the sides of rear molars which would touch wisdom teeth if I had them. (Flossing that surface did not satisfy my dentist.)
Now Xyliwhite (xylitol plus antiseptic essential oils): I use this instead of Listerine to avoid gum drying. My dentist sells some professional brand's equivalent because he doesn't like alcohol either and doesn't want patients getting mad at him for Crest Pro-Health side effects. (Crest Pro-Health didn't stain my teeth very badly, but the Wal Mart version stained them like chewing tobacco. I think they both impaired my sense of taste. I did enjoy the blue mouth-boogers, though.)
Old-school ACT

2 pieces Spry xylitol gum after lunch. (Currently do one Spry and one Trident XtraCare.)

Once my stockpile of Trident XtraCare runs out, I'll replace it as my Recaldent source with MI Paste. I haven't decided what time of day. Bedtime seems to be a good idea.

My justification for old-school Crest is weak: it's cheap, tastes better than anything else, and must be good if Zellies goes out of their way to recommend it. "Crest Regular Paste - or no paste at all!"

#22 nancyd

  • Guest
  • 249 posts
  • 2
  • Location:Bay Area, California

Posted 26 April 2009 - 09:30 PM

ive had my sonicare for close to 5 years and never had to replace the battery... i like it!!!


I've had mine for about the same time with no battery replacement.

#23 reenustar

  • Guest
  • 1 posts
  • 0

Posted 20 June 2009 - 11:04 AM

I have noticed really good effects from LEF's toothpaste.

Teeth has become a huge phenomenon. A white light smile is one of the first things people comment on your performance. There is considerable confusion about the products to use that warrant the prices they charge, whether or not, you should consult a dentist with the system you choose - and what, if ever, care is required to use the system of ve 'or chosen your new smile. Whitening toothpastes are now an integral part of oral hygiene for many Americans. Some dentists believe that tooth bleaching is more efficient in the use of lasers and other light sources, while others feel that the effect of dental bleaching remain the same, with or without the use of laser or light.




Teeth Whitening

Edited by Brainbox, 20 June 2009 - 08:04 PM.


#24 supernoober

  • Guest
  • 40 posts
  • 0
  • Location:California

Posted 03 July 2009 - 07:43 AM

What's wrong with a normal toothbrush?

Gum erosion. I finally succumbed to my dentist's badgering and got a Sonicare Extreme (Sonicare's teen version) two years ago. It's inexpensive and you use your own AA's, so no battery worries. (I use NiMH rechargeables.) I used one of those red tablets to verify that it removes all plaque. I freaked out after a few weeks when I saw that a band on my upper front teeth had changed color. I quickly realized that the Sonicare was removing tough stains, and that I needed to Sonicare the whole tooth, not just along the gumline. (I was using a manual brush too for non-gumline cleaning.) Those teeth became monochromatic soon thereafter.

Recently I've adopted a modified Zellies regimen.

Floss
Closys raises pH so that brushing won't damage teeth, is an antiseptic, and is a surfactant to remove debris.
Sonicare all but chewing surfaces with old-school Crest
Manually brush chewing surfaces with old-school Crest
Proxabrush the sides of rear molars which would touch wisdom teeth if I had them. (Flossing that surface did not satisfy my dentist.)
Now Xyliwhite (xylitol plus antiseptic essential oils): I use this instead of Listerine to avoid gum drying. My dentist sells some professional brand's equivalent because he doesn't like alcohol either and doesn't want patients getting mad at him for Crest Pro-Health side effects. (Crest Pro-Health didn't stain my teeth very badly, but the Wal Mart version stained them like chewing tobacco. I think they both impaired my sense of taste. I did enjoy the blue mouth-boogers, though.)
Old-school ACT

2 pieces Spry xylitol gum after lunch. (Currently do one Spry and one Trident XtraCare.)

Once my stockpile of Trident XtraCare runs out, I'll replace it as my Recaldent source with MI Paste. I haven't decided what time of day. Bedtime seems to be a good idea.

My justification for old-school Crest is weak: it's cheap, tastes better than anything else, and must be good if Zellies goes out of their way to recommend it. "Crest Regular Paste - or no paste at all!"


Help, I never really did anything else besides mouthwash, floss, and brush normally, so can you or somebody explain to be some of these things? Why do you need an electric toothbrush? And the gum? And would you guys recommend teeth whitening? Thanks

#25 spacey

  • Guest
  • 241 posts
  • 3

Posted 25 October 2010 - 09:18 PM

I'm surprised that so few here use tongue scrapes, 90% of all oral bacteria reside on the tongue and it is a common cause of haliotosis. I use a Sonic Care, floss every other day, tongue scrape daily and a few times a week I use a hydrogen peroxide solution for mouthwashing (I don't believe in alcohol-based mouthwashes).

#26 pycnogenol

  • Guest
  • 1,164 posts
  • 72
  • Location:In a van down by the river!

Posted 25 October 2010 - 10:29 PM

This stuff called SootheRx is absolutely terrific for sensitive teeth. Nothing beats it. One tube lasts me a whole year.

http://sale.dentist....sensitive-teeth

Edited by pycnogenol, 25 October 2010 - 10:30 PM.


#27 infinityXme

  • Guest
  • 51 posts
  • 0
  • Location:lurking around

Posted 26 October 2010 - 08:40 PM

Ah... finally, the missing piece of the puzzle has been discovered.


I use a Crest SpinBrush. Should I get something better? Then floss, then water pik. No sugar in my diet. Sugar is just plain bad for every part of the body, teeth most of all. And, there's plenty of natural sugars in foods like cereals, grains, and fruits without us adding more.

#28 hivemind

  • Guest
  • 417 posts
  • 60
  • Location:Earth

Posted 23 October 2011 - 07:40 AM

What's wrong with a normal toothbrush? All the electric brushes do is save you some hand motion. Use a manual brush and get a little excercise at the same time.

Try it yourself. Braun electric brushes are fantastic. The small brush fits easily everywhere in your mouth and cleans very effectively. Much better than a normal brush.

#29 seivtcho

  • Guest
  • 2,103 posts
  • 410
  • Location:Bulgaria

Posted 29 October 2011 - 09:25 AM

I am afraid, that I will have to dissapoint all who have electric toothbrushes.
The most important is to brush Your teeth correctly by not leaving even one dirty spot.
For now this makes the electrical brushes useless.
I will explain why.
If all people had absolutely equal teeth - with equal size, equally placed in the mouth, absolutely the same alweolar arcs with teeth placed on them on the absolutely the same way, with absolutely the same missing teeth and absolutely the same tooth decays etc. - then it would be possible to be made a toothbrush, that placed in an exact position and making specific movements to clean qualitively the teeth.
However, it is not so. People's teeth are not with absolutely the same size, there are minor diviations in teeths shape, the teeth are usually not possitioned orthodontically perfect, the fillings, artifitial crowns, bridges and prostheses are not absolutely the same and on absolutely the same teeth. So the idea, that automatically moving toothbrush will clean the teeth on a way, that You can't sounds ridiculous at this moment.
To brush correctly and efficietly Your teeth, You better do the following:
Before brushing, color Your teeth with colors, sold from the pharmacy or with iodpovidone (which is much cheaper, in this case gargle Your mouth with one spoon of iodpovidone) and then brush Your teeth. After You brush Your teeth look and see if You have removed all of the colored plaque. If You have not, brush the colored plaque until You brush it out. When You do this for a month, You will learn how to brush correctly Your teeth.

#30 hivemind

  • Guest
  • 417 posts
  • 60
  • Location:Earth

Posted 29 October 2011 - 10:02 AM

I am afraid, that I will have to dissapoint all who have electric toothbrushes.
The most important is to brush Your teeth correctly by not leaving even one dirty spot.
For now this makes the electrical brushes useless.
I will explain why.
If all people had absolutely equal teeth - with equal size, equally placed in the mouth, absolutely the same alweolar arcs with teeth placed on them on the absolutely the same way, with absolutely the same missing teeth and absolutely the same tooth decays etc. - then it would be possible to be made a toothbrush, that placed in an exact position and making specific movements to clean qualitively the teeth.
However, it is not so. People's teeth are not with absolutely the same size, there are minor diviations in teeths shape, the teeth are usually not possitioned orthodontically perfect, the fillings, artifitial crowns, bridges and prostheses are not absolutely the same and on absolutely the same teeth. So the idea, that automatically moving toothbrush will clean the teeth on a way, that You can't sounds ridiculous at this moment.
To brush correctly and efficietly Your teeth, You better do the following:
Before brushing, color Your teeth with colors, sold from the pharmacy or with iodpovidone (which is much cheaper, in this case gargle Your mouth with one spoon of iodpovidone) and then brush Your teeth. After You brush Your teeth look and see if You have removed all of the colored plaque. If You have not, brush the colored plaque until You brush it out. When You do this for a month, You will learn how to brush correctly Your teeth.


The electric brush does not "move automatically", you steer it with your hand. It can much more easily reach every area of your teeth. The brushing is more effective also.

Edited by Trip, 29 October 2011 - 10:04 AM.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users