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Results of my 1.5 years of injecting exogenous GDF11

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#121 pone11

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Posted 18 June 2016 - 01:46 AM

As I said in my last post, let's see the full paper here and take a look at the raw data.  Though LC/MS is a more accurate method, antibody purity is still an issue when you have GDF11 and myostatin 90% homologous.  

 

BTW, my empirical data with my cohort shows that young people are very sensitive to GDF11 - a dose of only 4 ng can cause GERD and other inflammation issues.  Older people can tolerate much higher doses.  What does this suggest to you? 

 

Look in your inbox for details on the latest Mayo research "Quantification of GDF11 and Myostatin in Human Aging and Cardiovascular Disease".

 

Some key parts of that study:

 

"Previous studies exploring the relationship of GDF11 to aging

have been contradictory. Thus, we utilized our quantitative LCMS/
MS assay to measure serum protein levels in 70 women
and 70 men, age 21–93. GDF11 levels did not statistically differ
as a function of age or sex (Figure 1B). MSTN levels were highest
in men in their 20s and statistically declined throughout subsequent
decades (p < 0.05) (Figure 1C). Female MSTN levels did
not change as a function of age (Figure 1C). Consistent with
our previous study (Bergen et al., 2015), young women had lower
circulating MSTN levels than young men (Figure 1C). As methods
used in several previous studies were unable to distinguish
GDF11 from MSTN, we also report combined GDF11 and
MSTN levels. GDF11 + MSTN levels declined in men (p <
0.05), but not women, throughout aging, in register with MSTN
levels (Figure 1D). When data from both sexes were combined,
we did not observe statistically significant differences in circulating
GDF11 + MSTN levels throughout aging (Figure 1E).
Notably, GDF11 represented, on average, 15.5% and 11.2% of
composite GDF11 + MSTN values for women and men, respectively.
Thus, GDF11 levels are not altered in women or men as a
function of age, and previous observations of age-dependent
decreases in GDF11 levels likely reflect changes in MSTN levels."
 
 
And regarding pathologies associated with high GDF11:
 
"We next interrogated potential associations between GDF11 and
MSTN levels and baseline comorbid conditions. Increased circulatingGDF11was
identified in a greater proportion of study participants
with diabetes (p = 0.019). 46% of individuals with high
GDF11 had diabetes, in contrast to only 14% with low levels.
Elevated GDF11 was also associated with a history of previous
cardiac conditions (p = 0.021),with a significant relationship drawn
with previous coronary artery bypass (p = 0.041). Participants with
the highest GDF11 levels at surgery had significantly higher New
YorkHeart Association (NYHA) class ranking than thosewith lower
GDF11 levels (p = 0.042) and were uniquely categorized as high
risk based on a mean Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) predicted
risk of mortality score greater than 8% (Thourani et al.,
2015) (p = 0.044) (Table 1). Critically,we did not identify differences
in aortic stenosis severity or related cardiac dysfunction, as
measuredbyejectionfraction,meangradient, aortic valve velocity,
valve area, valve area index, or left ventricular mass index, as a
function of circulatingGDF11 concentration (Table S5). In contrast
to GDF11, we were unable to draw any statistically significant
associations between MSTN and comorbid conditions, NYHA
classification, or mortality risk (Table 2)."
 
 
GDF11 is associated with frailty while aging:
 
"Frailty is a strong predictor of poor post-operative outcomes, yet
biomarkers of frailty have not been forthcoming. Accordingly,
we tested whether circulating GDF11 and MSTN protein levels
areassociatedwithfrailty statususingCardiovascularHealthStudy
(CHS) criteria, specified by unintentional weight loss, grip strength,
endurance,gait speed,andphysical activity (Friedetal., 2001).Participantswho
reported lowenergy and endurance had significantly
higher levels of circulating GDF11 than thosewho reported normal
energy (p < 0.001). A trend toward increased plasma GDF11 concentrations
was observed in individuals demonstrating unintentional
weight loss (p = 0.064) and low activity (p = 0.066), relative
to peers reporting no weight loss and normal activity (Figure 2B).
Similarly, individuals with slow gait (p = 0.150) and weak grip
strength (p = 0.163) appeared to possess higher GDF11 levels
than counterparts with normal gait and appropriate grip strength,
although these associations did not reach statistical significance.
Using the presence of three ormore CHS criteria as an operational
frailtydefinition,we comparedGDF11 concentrationsbetween frail
and non-frail study participants. Mean GDF11 levels increased by
21%as a function of frailty (p = 0.002) (Figure 2C). Unlike GDF11,
MSTN levels were not associated with frailty status (Table 2). To
evaluate whether the relationship between GDF11 and frailty remained
after adjusting for potential confounding demographic
and comorbidity characteristics, we applied a multivariable model
using a penalized stepwise logistic regression approach for variable
selection. After variable adjustment, GDF11 was still significantly
related to frailty (p = 0.003) (Table S6)."
 
 
This Mayo study uses the first really accurate technique for measuring GDF11 and GDF8 separately and precisely.  
 
So, Steve, I totally get that you felt better on this hormone and also had increased cardiovascular exercise.  But whatever it is that had this effect is something very hard to reverse engineer at this point.  This Mayo study doesn't prove that if you inject GDF11 that you will get all of these disease conditions.   This study doesn't even really prove that injecting GDF11 will increase your risk of these other conditions.   But this Mayo study should really make you question that injecting GDF11 is a fountain of youth that will reverse any of your tissue aging.   And who wants to be the guy on the block with the highest level of GDF11 circulating in your blood when this study is saying that those people all have terrible diseases and frailty as they age?
 
The basic science here just isn't finished.

Edited by pone11, 18 June 2016 - 01:49 AM.

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#122 Hebbeh

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Posted 18 June 2016 - 02:17 AM

As I said in my last post, let's see the full paper here and take a look at the raw data.  Though LC/MS is a more accurate method, antibody purity is still an issue when you have GDF11 and myostatin 90% homologous.  

 

BTW, my empirical data with my cohort shows that young people are very sensitive to GDF11 - a dose of only 4 ng can cause GERD and other inflammation issues.  Older people can tolerate much higher doses.  What does this suggest to you? 

 

Steve,

 

How are you sure what you are injecting is actually GDF11?  What other interventions have you used in addition to the GDF11(?) and growth hormone?  Any other hormone replacement therapies or supplements you may have used?  Perhaps the positive effects you experienced were due to a combination of growth hormone and increased exercise fitness?  Increasing exercise will build upon itself and provide many of the effects you noticed (not even considering combining with GH).  Many have had life altering transformations simply by changing lifestyle and dedicated exercise.  How many con-founders may there be? 


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#123 stevegperry

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Posted 20 June 2016 - 04:32 PM

Pone,

 

Thanks for the full Mayo Clinic paper.  They do make a strong case for increasing GDF11 levels as we age.  BUT, then there is this paragraph: 

 

"However, we are not yet able to determine the relative proportions of either latent vs. mature GDF11 or MSTN, or unbound vs. bound….”.  And note from the paper on my site titled "Cardiovascular Effects of GDF11" they write:

 

Although mature GDF11 and myostatin ligands share substantial sequence identity, their prodomains are only 52% identical (Figure 3). Like other TGFβ members, the GDF11 and myostatin prodomains aid in folding of the mature dimeric ligand.34,35 However, unlike most TGFβ ligands, GDF11 and myostatin remain tightly bound to their prodomains after cleavage by furin-like proteases,36–41 and are thereby held in a latent state, unable to bind receptors. Ligand activation requires additional cleavage of the prodomain by a tolloid-like (TLD) metalloproteinase.

 

Based on the two quotes above, it's very possible that they are measuring latent GDF11, which may very well increase with age.  Maybe GDF11 will end up being like testosterone - with total and free numbers.  Feel free to contact the Mayo Clinic and ask them for more clarity on the above.

 

As for Hebbeh's post above, I purchased my GDF11 from reputable labs like Peprotech.  And GDF11 has a unique set of positive/negative effects that can be observed within a few hours of injection e.g., sharp vision/GERD.  So odds are almost 100% I have real GDF11.

 As for my exercise program, it's been the same for years - a couple of visits to the gym with occasional hard hikes/bike rides.  And my regimen outside of GDF11 has been the same for a long time too - 25 years on GH and 10 on testosterone.

 

 

 

 


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#124 pone11

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Posted 20 June 2016 - 09:25 PM

Pone,

 

Thanks for the full Mayo Clinic paper.  They do make a strong case for increasing GDF11 levels as we age.  BUT, then there is this paragraph: 

 

"However, we are not yet able to determine the relative proportions of either latent vs. mature GDF11 or MSTN, or unbound vs. bound….”.  And note from the paper on my site titled "Cardiovascular Effects of GDF11" they write:

 

Although mature GDF11 and myostatin ligands share substantial sequence identity, their prodomains are only 52% identical (Figure 3). Like other TGFβ members, the GDF11 and myostatin prodomains aid in folding of the mature dimeric ligand.34,35 However, unlike most TGFβ ligands, GDF11 and myostatin remain tightly bound to their prodomains after cleavage by furin-like proteases,36–41 and are thereby held in a latent state, unable to bind receptors. Ligand activation requires additional cleavage of the prodomain by a tolloid-like (TLD) metalloproteinase.

 

Based on the two quotes above, it's very possible that they are measuring latent GDF11, which may very well increase with age.  Maybe GDF11 will end up being like testosterone - with total and free numbers.  Feel free to contact the Mayo Clinic and ask them for more clarity on the above.

 

As for Hebbeh's post above, I purchased my GDF11 from reputable labs like Peprotech.  And GDF11 has a unique set of positive/negative effects that can be observed within a few hours of injection e.g., sharp vision/GERD.  So odds are almost 100% I have real GDF11.

 As for my exercise program, it's been the same for years - a couple of visits to the gym with occasional hard hikes/bike rides.  And my regimen outside of GDF11 has been the same for a long time too - 25 years on GH and 10 on testosterone.

 

The subtlety of "free" versus "bound" GDF11 or MSTN is very interesting.  That's a good idea.    Obviously we are years away from clarifying that.

 

In another GDF11 thread, I developed a hypothesis I want to run by you.   Is it possible that the mechanism of action for GDF11 is not the synthesis of new muscle fibers, but rather the *repair* of *damaged* muscle fibers?  

Isn't exercise just damage to the muscle that must be repaired?  If that hypothesis is right, then what is happening is that every time you exercise while on GDF11, you get full recovery from the damage of exercise much quicker than before.  That allows you to push your exercise levels higher and higher, in accordance with your now-elevated repair ability for muscle.

 

Most of the benefit - and all of the neurogenesis - would therefore come from your increasing quantities and difficulty-level for exercise.

 

As you look back on your experience level with GDF11, do you perceive that you were developing strength and endurance even during relatively sedentary periods?   Was there a sudden jump in aerobic ability from day one?   Or was it more as I described, and your initial ability remained the same, but you were recovering from each exercise session more rapidly?



#125 stevegperry

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Posted 22 June 2016 - 01:43 AM

Hello Longecity,

 

Patient 1's pre and post GDF11 biomarkers are now available for your analysis.

 

Patient 1 (I am patient 0) went in for pre GDF11 biomarkers on February 16th, 2016 and commenced GDF11 supplementation of 25 ng/day on March 30, 2016.  On June 21, 2016, after nearly 3 months of GDF11 supplementation, patient 1 went in for a second set of biomarkers.  The results can be found on GDF11Rejuvenation.com

 

Note that the subject is a 52-year-old male who reports minimal exercise aside from walking.  I will let you draw your own conclusions, but here are a few things that stood out for me:

 

1)      Skin Elasticity – Patient 1 went from baseline skin elasticity of age 49.7 to age 34.37.  I also saw a very dramatic improvement in skin elasticity from age 57.3 to 40.53.  It appears that skin elasticity is one of GDF11’s strongest suits.

2)      Sphygmocor (Cardiac) – Patient 1 saw nice improvement in the cardiac area – a 50% reduction in augmentation pressure, from 4 to 2, and a 64% reduction in augmentation index, from 14% to 5%.  Which resulted in a cardiac reference age of between 26 and 32 years.  Note that ejection duration and Buckberg SEVR did not improve, though these are not as heavily weighted in computing cardiac age.  Interestingly enough, my ejection duration and SEVR did improve considerably on GDF11.

3)      Body Composition – Patient 1 saw a weight increase of 7.1 lbs. on GDF11.  Also note a .4 lb. increase in skeletal muscle mass which mirrors my anabolic experience on GDF11.  This suggests that, when properly dosed, GDF11 does not bind to activin type 2 myostatin receptor sites.  However, much of the cohort has reported significantly increased appetite on GDF11, which could be a partial explanation for the increase in body fat.

4)      Spirometry (Pulmonary) – FVC and FEV1 down slightly, though this is not significant since the test has quite a bit of variability.

5)      Cognitives – coming soon, stay tuned.

 

Thoughts and feedback welcome...


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#126 Nuke

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Posted 22 June 2016 - 01:48 PM

Hi Steve

 

Awesome, thanks for your hard work. 

 

Did patient 1 report any GERD at 25ng/day? How did you decide on that amount?

 

On your site I see only the biomarkers for skin elasticity tested in Feb, no other Feb biomarkers. 



#127 stevegperry

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Posted 22 June 2016 - 03:32 PM

Thanks Nuke!  Interestingly enough, patient 1 has not experienced any side effects yet.  Patient 1 used the dosing formula in my paper, which recommends about 13 ng/day and doubled it.  I didn't recommend this and told him if he got GERD, dyspnea, etc. that he would have to take a "GDF11 holiday" and cut the dose in half.  I suspect this may happen eventually, since I do believe GDF11 down regulates. 

 

As for patient 1's biomarkers, you should see a skin elasticity test from February and one from June.  The other biomarkers store historical data, so they only appear once.

 



#128 Nuke

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Posted 22 June 2016 - 03:49 PM

As for patient 1's biomarkers, you should see a skin elasticity test from February and one from June.  The other biomarkers store historical data, so they only appear once.

 

:blush: Eish. I did not see that. Blond moment.

 

Do you have a Patient 2 lined up yet?



#129 stevegperry

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Posted 22 June 2016 - 04:25 PM

At least 3 more patients have done thorough biomarkers like mine and patient 1's.  Hopefully, they will do round 2 soon.  Interestingly enough, the biomarkers are much more expensive to run than the GDF11 itself.  And a couple of these people have to hop on a plane to get them done.  All well worth it, of course!



#130 Nate-2004

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Posted 22 September 2016 - 08:26 PM

After discovering GDF-11 from the following video, I googled it and found this nature article discussing the contradictory results in studies which indicated that there may be more than one form of this protein.

 

Anyone know of any updates regarding the conclusions drawn in that article?

 



#131 stevegperry

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Posted 23 September 2016 - 06:35 PM

My paper on GDF11Rejuvenation.com addresses most of the GDF11 controversaries. Also, this paper, http://onlinelibrary....12438/abstract recently came out saying that 90% of our GDF11 is found in our platelets, not in serum.  And GDF11 does go down with age in serum, but not in platelets.  I am working on a platelet lysate test to verify this...



#132 Nate-2004

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Posted 23 September 2016 - 06:50 PM

That's great I'll read a lot of it and come back with more questions. It's a whole new avenue I am definitely interested in. 


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#133 owtsgmi

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Posted 23 October 2016 - 12:22 AM

@stevegperry

How's it going?  Would love to hear some updates!



#134 zorba990

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Posted 23 October 2016 - 03:35 AM

My paper on GDF11Rejuvenation.com addresses most of the GDF11 controversaries. Also, this paper, http://onlinelibrary....12438/abstract recently came out saying that 90% of our GDF11 is found in our platelets, not in serum. And GDF11 does go down with age in serum, but not in platelets. I am working on a platelet lysate test to verify this...


Interesting. Your efforts are very appreciated

#135 stevegperry

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Posted 24 October 2016 - 11:01 PM

Hello Longecity!

 

Owlsgmi asked for an update on my GDF11 project.  I spoke at Raadfest and you can see my talk here:   At least 25 people that I know of are trying GDF11, though unfortunately, very few have taken the comprehensive biomarkers that I suggest.  I have heard lots of good anecdotal feedback, but you know my philosophy - hard biomarker data is all that counts.

 

Guess I will have to partner with a good anti aging doc (know anyone who'd be a good fit?) and open a Bahamian GDF11 clinic. Part of the clinic's fees would be two rounds of the biomarkers I list on gdf11rejuvenation.com.  Then we'd have lots of good data to determine important things like an optimal dosing strategy.

 

As for me, I'm down regulated on GDF11 and only need a 3 ng dose that I take every Monday.  You can now see 4 sets of my biomarkers on my site which strongly suggest GDF11's continued efficacy.

 

Note that my recent skin elasticity test came in at age 33, which is 25 years younger than I am.

 

Even more impressive are my CIMT tests.  Check out my CIMT measurements - as you know, carotid health is highly correlated with coronary health.  These tests are 10 years apart – in 2006, mean right IMT was .661 mm.  Now right IMT is .577 – a decrease of 12.8%.  Left IMT went from .677 to .553 – a decrease of 22.5%.  Even my anti aging doc, who is a telomere guy, was impressed.  He wrote:

 

That is a significant reduction in CIMT over a 10 year period. The expected increase is about 0.005 mm per year (0.05mm for 10 years) and you decreased by  0.084 and 0.124 mm.  This is about 10-20 years of CIMT reversal.

 

If you are interested in trying GDF11 and are willing to spend a few bucks and take the time to do proper biomarkers, feel free to email me at steve@stevegperry.com.

 

Steve


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#136 Nate-2004

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Posted 24 October 2016 - 11:40 PM

Hello Longecity!

 

Owlsgmi asked for an update on my GDF11 project.  I spoke at Raadfest and you can see my talk here:   At least 25 people that I know of are trying GDF11, though unfortunately, very few have taken the comprehensive biomarkers that I suggest.  I have heard lots of good anecdotal feedback, but you know my philosophy - hard biomarker data is all that counts.

 

Guess I will have to partner with a good anti aging doc (know anyone who'd be a good fit?) and open a Bahamian GDF11 clinic. Part of the clinic's fees would be two rounds of the biomarkers I list on gdf11rejuvenation.com.  Then we'd have lots of good data to determine important things like an optimal dosing strategy.

 

As for me, I'm down regulated on GDF11 and only need a 3 ng dose that I take every Monday.  You can now see 4 sets of my biomarkers on my site which strongly suggest GDF11's continued efficacy.

 

Note that my recent skin elasticity test came in at age 33, which is 25 years younger than I am.

 

Even more impressive are my CIMT tests.  Check out my CIMT measurements - as you know, carotid health is highly correlated with coronary health.  These tests are 10 years apart – in 2006, mean right IMT was .661 mm.  Now right IMT is .577 – a decrease of 12.8%.  Left IMT went from .677 to .553 – a decrease of 22.5%.  Even my anti aging doc, who is a telomere guy, was impressed.  He wrote:

 

That is a significant reduction in CIMT over a 10 year period. The expected increase is about 0.005 mm per year (0.05mm for 10 years) and you decreased by  0.084 and 0.124 mm.  This is about 10-20 years of CIMT reversal.

 

If you are interested in trying GDF11 and are willing to spend a few bucks and take the time to do proper biomarkers, feel free to email me at steve@stevegperry.com.

 

Steve

 

Sounds great. Watching the video. What is CIMT?

 

Also where can I get GDF-11 and how much is it?


Edited by Nate-2004, 24 October 2016 - 11:42 PM.

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#137 aribadabar

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 12:03 AM

 

Sounds great. Watching the video. What is CIMT?

 

Also where can I get GDF-11 and how much is it?

 

Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test (CIMT)- it is a CVS health biomarker

 

Most labs won't sell to individuals unless ( appear to be) affiliated with a research institution. You may try the Amazon suggestion Steve made in the video but who knows what quality you would get and at a pretty steep price at that. 


Edited by aribadabar, 25 October 2016 - 12:04 AM.


#138 stevegperry

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 12:03 AM

CIMT stands for Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test.  Check out https://www.cedars-s...-Test-CIMT.aspx

 



#139 Nate-2004

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 12:09 AM

 

 

Sounds great. Watching the video. What is CIMT?

 

Also where can I get GDF-11 and how much is it?

 

Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test (CIMT)- it is a CVS health biomarker

 

Most labs won't sell to individuals unless ( appear to be) affiliated with a research institution. You may try the Amazon suggestion Steve made in the video but who knows what quality you would get and at a pretty steep price at that. 

 

 

Ouch, that Amazon stuff is seriously expensive. I don't even know what the dosage would be but $250 for 10 micrograms? Jeez. I can't even imagine what a year and a half's worth would cost. 

 

What labs are there that sell this? Maybe I can find a way.

 

Thanks for the links Steve.



#140 aribadabar

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 12:17 AM

Ouch, that Amazon stuff is seriously expensive. I don't even know what the dosage would be but $250 for 10 micrograms? Jeez. I can't even imagine what a year and a half's worth would cost. 

 

What labs are there that sell this? Maybe I can find a way.

 

Thanks for the links Steve.

 

 

Not to derail the thread, I suggest you read the thread from start to finish (+ the links to Steve's website contained therein) you would find the answers.


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#141 platypus

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 03:11 PM

Thanks for the update stevegperry! Are any anecdotal reports available from the 20+ other people who have tried it? 



#142 owtsgmi

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 11:30 PM

Thanks for the update, stevegperry!  I am going to start the protocol, but am admittedly too lazy/busy to run the benchmark tests.   Thanks for sharing your knowledge and experience!



#143 aribadabar

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 11:50 PM

Thanks for the update, stevegperry! I am going to start the protocol, but am admittedly too lazy/busy to run the benchmark tests. Thanks for sharing your knowledge and experience!


Which lab product are you using and how have you obtained it?

#144 PeaceAndProsperity

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Posted 26 October 2016 - 08:29 AM

I was impressed with how you look but you still have obvious signs of old age in the form of collagen issues (collagen synthesis inhibitors can cause the hanging facial skin) which should improve if it was reversing your aging. Still, gdf11 might add healthy years to your life.

With the telomere model of aging it actually seems to reverse those issues with hanging skin, but this is in animal models and people who claim to have youthful telomere lengths, we've yet to see it make an old person look young.

Is there evidence that gdf11 increases telomere length? If not I don't see how you can prevent replicative senescence and if you can't then I can't see how it would increase your lifespan by anything.


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#145 Nate-2004

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Posted 28 October 2016 - 05:40 PM

So while I am getting all my biomarkers, which may have to wait given my insurance may not cover it, I'm looking at ordering from Peprotech but they won't ship to residents. Does anyone have a place I can ship to? If so could I ship to you and then pay for your shipping to me in turn?



#146 simon007

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Posted 31 October 2016 - 07:58 AM

Hi @,

 

I found this interresting article

 

http://www.lifeexten...m_medium=social

 

Simon



#147 stevegperry

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Posted 18 November 2016 - 10:44 PM

Time to answer a few of the questions above:

 

Are any anecdotal reports available from the 20+ other people who have tried it? 

 

On GDF11Rejuvenation.com, you can see my Raadfest powerpoint. There is a slide that has all the anecdotal feedback on GDF11.

 

Ouch, that Amazon stuff is seriously expensive. I don't even know what the dosage would be but $250 for 10 micrograms? Jeez. I can't even imagine what a year and a half's worth would cost. 

 

Read my paper on my site, especially the dosing formula.  The average dose is around 20 ng/day and you do down regulate pretty quickly.  Therefore, a 5 ug (5000 ng) vial of GDF11 costing $80, can easily last you a year.  I can't think of too many anti aging regimens less expensive than this.  As for labs that make GDF11, check out the "Biomarkers..." document.

 

 I was impressed with how you look but you still have obvious signs of old age in the form of collagen issues (collagen synthesis inhibitors can cause the hanging facial skin) which should improve if it was reversing your aging.

 

That may be, though I challenge you to find another 58 year old who has my skin elasticity as well as overall skin glow.  Plus, I am now losing weight on GDF11, which isn't hard to do if you have a little discipline.  GDF11 raises metabolism and does give you a voracious appetite, but if you can skip stuff like the mac and cheese at 2 AM, you can lose weight on it. So maybe next year at Raadfest I'll be little less "jowly".

 

Still, gdf11 might add healthy years to your life.

With the telomere model of aging it actually seems to reverse those issues with hanging skin, but this is in animal models and people who claim to have youthful telomere lengths, we've yet to see it make an old person look young.

 

Very true. I've asked the telomere camp for biomarker proof the telomerase activation improves skin elasticity, CIMT, augmentation pressure, etc. and I have yet to see anything.

 

Is there evidence that gdf11 increases telomere length? If not I don't see how you can prevent replicative senescence and if you can't then I can't see how it would increase your lifespan by anything.

 

Ultimately, I believe that repairing stem cell DNA and rejuvenating stem cell colonies, which is the MOA of GDF11, will prove far more important than lengthening telomeres.  Short telomere cells are highly DNA damaged and probably should senesce and die.   I do have a bunch of Repeat Diagnostics telomere length tests for myself on my site.  The data is noisy, but it appears that my telomeres have not shortened during my 2.5 years on GDF11.  Whether this is even relevant or not, time will tell...

 

 

 


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#148 Nate-2004

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Posted 18 November 2016 - 10:50 PM

 

Read my paper on my site, especially the dosing formula.  The average dose is around 20 ng/day and you do down regulate pretty quickly.  Therefore, a 5 ug (5000 ng) vial of GDF11 costing $80, can easily last you a year.  I can't think of too many anti aging regimens less expensive than this.  As for labs that make GDF11, check out the "Biomarkers..." document.

 

 

Steve I've been unable to find anyone with a lab willing to accept my shipment from one of the labs you list. I don't know if you have one but I'll post my biomarkers and update them if I can get access to the stuff.



#149 stevegperry

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Posted 19 November 2016 - 12:05 AM

Nate,

 

I will admit you have to be "resourceful" to deal with the labs who make GDF11.  if you are not up for that kind of hassle, I would just order GDF11 from Amazon: https://www.amazon.c...&keywords=gdf11

 

 

 



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#150 Nate-2004

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Posted 07 December 2016 - 08:47 PM

Nate,

 

I will admit you have to be "resourceful" to deal with the labs who make GDF11.  if you are not up for that kind of hassle, I would just order GDF11 from Amazon: https://www.amazon.c...&keywords=gdf11

 

Has anyone lab tested the stuff on Amazon? Not sure it's worth buying without knowing if it's legit.

 

Will they only deliver to a lab address or just any business address?







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