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Cognitive Repair Traumatic Brain Injury/Shaken Baby Syndrome

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#1 MTCicero

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Posted 15 June 2016 - 12:53 PM


Hello everyone!

I am interested in learning about potential treatment options for TBI (resulting from Shaken Baby Syndrome). The trauma took place 26 years ago (when I was 8 weeks old) so obviously treatment is likely implausible but I figured it is worth asking. To be specific, I have left occipital cortical gliosis/scar tissue as well as gliosis in my upper spinal chord consistent with traumatic flexion extension injury. I have noticed serious neurological problems despite the gliosis being in my occipital lobe--the most notable issues pertaining to memory retention and verbal fluidity. I also have nerve damage and had spinal stenosis surgery 6 weeks ago to deal with extensive atrophy.

Anyway, I am experimenting with Nootropics at the moment to see if I can treat the neurological issues and if anyone is willing, I would be interested in learning about options for treating my spinal issues as well! 

I recently started the following regimen: 

250 MG of Uridine Monophosphate
250 MG of Citicoline (this dosage is too high for me and I plan on reducing it, makes me quite drowsy)
2000 MG of Fish Oil (with roughly 900 MG of EPA and 800 of DHA)
A Quality Multivitamin

Calcium 

 

My longstanding med list is as follows:

Lamictal (200 MG 2X) which may be a problem when used in conjunction with nootropics but is necessary because I'm Bipolar
Xanax 1 MG at night, I know its terrible for me but I cannot sleep otherwise, I have serious sleeping issues
Zyrtec 10 MG 2x a day, terrible allergies 
Finasteride, for hair loss, yeaaa I'm vain, haha

---

If you took the time to read the entirety of this message I truly appreciate it! Haha, I figured the more information the better...

Thank you in advance!

All the best,

Daniel
 



#2 psychejunkie

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Posted 16 June 2016 - 04:01 AM

Hello Daniel,

 

Most of the nootropics might have interaction with your meds and I recommend natural supplements or herbs will be effective and safer!

 

You can add Ginkgo Biloba (in small doses), for boosting Cerebral Blood Flow and gliogenesis along with Royal Jelly for neurogenesis, to your current stack.

Taking Choline Bitartrate + Bacopa extract also helps with your memory and verbal problems.

 

As suggestion, Stay away from any nootropics that has a link to Glutamate and/or GABA neurotransmitters.


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#3 MTCicero

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Posted 16 June 2016 - 08:11 AM

Dear psychejunkie,

To preface, thank you so much for your reply!

I am looking into the items you mentioned and find your analysis intriguing. I used ginko years ago and it was certainly helpful but I have never tried the others.

Do you have any recommendations as to where I can locate quality sources in the EU for the products you mentioned?

Also, if I considered lowering my dosage for lamictal/tapering off it gradually do you have any recommendations as to what I could take in its stead? I am sure you will tell me to consult with a medical professional, however, their recommendation is to remain on lamictal because bipolar symptoms progress with age but their treatment method seems to deal with the symptoms rather than the cause itself. I have read several studies that show that the combination of uridine +dha+ choline can help with neurological disorders and have shown to assist folks with mood disorders as well (which is why I am taking the combo). *Edit* And I obviously saw Mr. Happy's Stack, should have mentioned that as well, lol.

Your thoughts?

Best and thanks again,

Daniel

-


Edited by MTCicero, 16 June 2016 - 08:25 AM.


#4 gamesguru

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Posted 16 June 2016 - 11:04 AM

consider also dropping the fina and one day xanies. the lamtical can be replaced with lithium orotate or lappaconitine, both OTC.

Cognitive ability in youth who experienced brain trauma is improved with prolonged usage of pramiracetam, suggesting neurogenic effects

#5 MTCicero

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Posted 16 June 2016 - 12:43 PM

Games,

 

Thank you for the recommendation. Do you have any recommendations for alternatives to fin and xanies? I was losing hair (thus the use of fin and it has stopped the process) and xanax is very effective at helping me fall and stay asleep. Doc is pretty sure I have sleep apnea but I just haven't taken a test yet (my father has it though).. 

I will look into the two lamictal replacements you mentioned, I am very, very interested in getting off of it.. If I were to use one of the two alternatives you mentioned, would you have any issues with my current stack? Also do you have a preference between the two? Finding these...in Greece may be difficult so I will likely have to order one or the other should I choose to experiment.

How do you think Pramiracetam compares to Noopept? I have tried the latter and did not notice any significant changes albeit I was on a low dose.

Thank you again for replying, I truly appreciate all of ya'lls feedback!

All the best,

 

Daniel



#6 gamesguru

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Posted 16 June 2016 - 02:40 PM

PJ mentioned bacopa. kava and magnesium are good for anxiety too, not as good as benzos tho. populus nigra and fenugreek have same action as finasteride, 500mg. 5-alpha-reductase inhibition. fisetin blocks androgen receptors, and hypersensitive receptors, rather than excess DHT, is thought to underlie early male pattern baldness.  the lithium should be safe without contraindication, i found a greek supplier here.  the lappaconitine might be canceled out by too much sodium and calcium (i see you supplement calcium), but it would only interact with your lamictal, because they do the same thing! sodium channel blockers. it's not going to be nearly as easy to find as lithium, either in the US or EU.



#7 MTCicero

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Posted 16 June 2016 - 03:16 PM

GG (lol), once again, thank you so much for your help!

 

Can't kava cause liver problems? I've used magneisum as well but never bacopa. A brief aside, the breadth of your knowledge is astounding. 

The leap to removing finasteride from my regimen will be a tough for me considering that should that combination fail (for me), it will take an additional three months for the med to start working again. 

Thank you for finding a Greek supplier for me, it was very thoughtful of you to do so! Any recommendations on how to experiment with the dosage +reduction of lamictal? As aforementioned, I am on 200 mg 2X a day and I see the lithium comes in 5 mg tabs. And the calcium is only temporary, I'm just using it for a couple months while my bones heal post-op.

Also, I am having a very hard time locating a distributor that actually has Pramiracetam in stock in the EU, any more recommendations? What you said lines up quite well with the research on Pramiracetam, perhaps that, in conjunction with my existing stack can bring about some lasting change. That would be amazing! 

Thank you again for your help and sound advice!

Best,

Daniel



#8 gamesguru

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Posted 16 June 2016 - 04:14 PM

Hepatotoxicity

The frequency of adverse reactions to kava, particularly liver injury, is not known.  Based upon reported cases, the estimated frequency of clinically apparent liver injury due to kava is less than 1:1,000,000 daily doses.  However, spontaneous reporting is believed to capture less than 1% of severe adverse events from the use of dietary supplements.  Between 50 and 100 cases of clinically apparent liver injury have been published or discussed in the literature.  Advocates of the herbal have strongly rejected these numbers, disputing both their accuracy and the causality assessment process.  Still, there seem to be convincing evidence in some cases of severe hepatitis ending in fulminant hepatic failure, requiring liver transplantation, and even leading to death.  Patients typically present with fatigue, nausea, elevations in serum aminotransferase levels, and jaundice 2 to 24 weeks after starting use of the product.  The pattern of enzyme elevations is hepatocellular with marked elevations in serum aminotransferase and minimal increases in alkaline phosphatase levels.  In some cases, features of immunoallergic hepatitis (rash, fever, eosinophilia, and recurrence on reexposure) are present.  Liver biopsy findings include focal hepatocellular necrosis, lobular inflammation and intrahepatic cholestasis.  In more severe cases there is massive or submassive necrosis.

--> http://livertox.nih.gov/KavaKava.htm

 

not sure about finding a prami supplier. it's called "pramistar" in the EU. im a little reluctant to recommend it though, skeptical of long-term side effects. you could also go the natural route:

The committee highlights curcumin as one flavonoid for which there is substantial evidence of neuroprotectant effects in animal models of TBI...

 

Therefore, the consumption of flavonoid-rich foods, such as berries and cocoa, throughout life holds a potential to limit the neurodegeneration associated with a variety of neurological disorders and to prevent or reverse normal or abnormal deteriorations in cognitive performance.

 

the lappaconitine havent tried, but it looks good. lithium i would do 1/4 of a tab, maybe you try 1 full tab and see if theres side effects. i would personally taper off at a doc's advice then start the lithium fresh, but it seems many redditors like to combine them. PJ recommended royal jelly. royal jelly, bilobalide (ginkgo), naringin (in oranges/grapefruits), nobiletin (same foods), ibogaine and exercise all induce GDNF. ginkgo also has NGF, BDNF, as well as neuromodulatory or adaptogenic properties.

 

a little searching also turned up Prostaglandin D2 as a relevant factor. i found one guy suggesting quercetin + jojoba + lecithin. didnt look into mechanisms or other testimonies, so take it with a grain of salt.

Newly Discovered Factor in Androgenetic Alopecia. The Cure is Near? Washington: Researchers have discovered an abnormal amount of a protein called Prostaglandin D2 in the bald scalp of men with male pattern baldness.

 
The discovery by researchers at Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania may lead directly to new treatments for the most common cause of hair loss in men.
In both human and animal models, researchers found that a prostaglandin known as PGD2 and its derivative, 15-dPGJ2, inhibit hair growth.
The PGD2-related inhibition occurred through a receptor called GPR44, which is a promising therapeutic target for androgenetic alopecia in both men and women with hair loss and thinning.
Male pattern baldness strikes 8 of 10 men under 70 years old, and causes hair follicles to shrink and produce microscopic hairs, which grow for a shorter duration of time than normal follicles.

Researchers took an unbiased approach when scanning for potential biological causes of baldness, looking in scalp tissue from balding and non-bald spots from men with male pattern baldness and then corroborating findings in mouse models.
They found that levels of PGD2 were elevated in bald scalp tissue at levels 3 times greater than what was found in comparative haired scalp of men with androgenetic alopecia.
When PGD2 was added to cultured hair follicles, PGD2-treated hair was significantly shortly, while PGD2``s derivative, 15-dPGJ2, completely inhibited hair growth.

“Although a different prostaglandin was known to increase hair growth, our findings were unexpected, as prostaglandins haven`t been thought about in relation to hair loss, yet it made sense that there was an inhibitor of hair growth, based on our earlier work looking at hair follicle stem cells,” said George Cotsarelis, MD, chair and professor of Dermatology, and senior author on the studies.

In a Penn study published last year, underlying hair follicle stem cells were found intact, suggesting that the scalp was lacking an activator or something was inhibiting hair follicle growth.
Prostaglandins are well characterized for their role in many bodily functions – controlling cell growth, constricting and dilating smooth muscle tissue – and a different prostaglandin (F2alpha) is known to increase hair growth.
Researchers found that as PGD2 inhibits hair growth, other prostaglandins work in opposition, enhancing and regulating the speed of hair growth.
While these studies looked at AGA in men, the researchers noted that prostaglandins may represent a common pathway shared by both men and women with AGA.
Future studies, potentially testing topical treatments that may target GPR44, can determine whether targeting prostaglandins will benefit woman with AGA as well.

 

perhaps also things to optimize LDL/HDL, and phosphatidylcholine/serine is prudent. the mere addition of a phosphatidyl donor could resolve limiting steps in the generation of many necessary brain membrane lipids. also consider MCTs or refined coconut oil, in addition to your fish oil. i may be getting ahead of myself here, but even something like exercise and ketogenic diet might give a little boost. i would personally use the keto sparingly tho. last words, you can also use valerian in place of kava if it's just to treat insomnia, and not anxiety.

Role of Lipids in Brain Injury and Diseases.
Adibhatla RM1, Hatcher JF. (2007)

Lipid metabolism is of particular interest due to its high concentration in CNS. The importance of lipids in cell signaling and tissue physiology is demonstrated by many CNS disorders and injuries that involve deregulated metabolism. The long suffering lipid field is gaining reputation and respect as evidenced through the Center of Biomedical Research Excellence in Lipidomics and Pathobiology (COBRE), Lipid MAPS (Metabolites And Pathways Strategy) Consortium sponsored by NIH, European initiatives for decoding the lipids through genomic approaches, and Genomics of Lipid-associated Disorder (GOLD) project initiated by Austrian government. This review attempts to provide an overview of the lipid imbalances associated with neurological disorders (Alzheimer's, Parkinson's; Niemann-Pick; Multiple sclerosis, Huntington, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, schizophrenia, bipolar disorders and epilepsy) and CNS injury (Stroke, traumatic brain injury; and spinal cord injury) and a few provocative thoughts. Lipidomic analyses along with RNA silencing will provide new insights into the role of lipid intermediates in cell signaling and hopefully open new avenues for prevention or treatment options.


Edited by gamesguru, 16 June 2016 - 05:08 PM.


#9 gamesguru

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Posted 16 June 2016 - 05:19 PM

edit: i found out quercetin is not so good a PGD2 inhibitor, but i found you another choice. could be applied topically, or ingested orally.

Inhibition of hematopoietic prostaglandin D2 synthase (H-PGDS) by an alkaloid extract from Combretum molle.
Moyo R, Chimponda T, Mukanganyama S1. (2014)

BACKGROUND:
Hematopoietic prostaglandin D2 synthase (H-PGDS, GST Sigma) is a member of the glutathione S-transferase super family of enzymes that catalyses the conjugation of electrophilic substances with reduced glutathione. The enzyme catalyses the conversion of PGH2 to PGD2 which mediates inflammatory responses. The inhibition of H-PGDS is of importance in alleviating damage to tissues due to unwarranted synthesis of PGD2. Combretum molle has been used in African ethno medicinal practices and has been shown to reduce fever and pain. The effect of C. molle alkaloid extract on H-PGDS was thus, investigated.
METHODS:
H-PGDS was expressed in Escherichia coli XL1-Blue cells and purified using nickel immobilized metal affinity chromatography. The effect of C. molle alkaloid extract on H-PGDS activity was determined with 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) as substrate. The effect of C. molle alkaloid extract with time on H-PGDS was determined. The mechanism of inhibition was then investigated using CDNB and glutathione (GSH) as substrates.
RESULTS:
A specific activity of 24 μmol/mg/min was obtained after H-PGDS had been purified. The alkaloid extract exhibited a 70% inhibition on H-PGDS with an IC50 of 13.7 μg/ml. C. molle alkaloid extract showed an uncompetitive inhibition of H-PGDS with Ki = 41 μg/ml towards GSH, and non-competitive inhibition towards CDNB with Ki = 7.7 μg/ml and Ki' = 9.2 μg/ml.
CONCLUSION:
The data shows that C. molle alkaloid extract is a potent inhibitor of H-PGDS. This study thus supports the traditional use of the plant for inflammation.

 

a few more recommendations on the anxiety/xanax note

Social anxiety:

l-tryptophan (dietary sources please)

 

egcg (green tea)
theanine (green tea)
kava, bacopa, ashwagandha
lemon balm?

ALCAR
phosphatidylserine
creatine
inositol

flax, hemp, chia, or sesame seed
(or fish)

(pharms not recommended)
propanolol
buproprion
benzos

 

exercise, exposure or therapy

 

Depression:

omega-3s, flax- or hempseed is fine

fiber, polyphenols (aka mindful eating)

chromium, lithium (naturally obtainable), zinc, magnesium

taurine, tyrosine, tryptophan

theanine, inositol, creatine

ALCAR & PS

saffron, turmeric, ginger

bacopa, ginkgo, gotu kola

ginseng, ashwagandha, rhodiola

socialization, exercise, intellectual or aesthetic activities


Edited by gamesguru, 16 June 2016 - 05:27 PM.


#10 Kinesis

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Posted 17 June 2016 - 07:13 PM

I agree that it's a good idea to use as little lamictal and xanax as possible, but please work with your doctor if you decide to reduce or discontinue these meds.  My cousin had brain injuries due to surgery and takes lamictal.  If he stops he has seizures.  Xanax withdrawal may be less serious, but just as miserable.  You can probably preserve your sleep by first reducing the dosage and then by phasing in some of the natural GABA-ergic supplements like lemon balm and valerian along with melatonin at bedtime.  GABA itself helps some people (I am one of them).  One of the best resources for discontinuing such meds is the Mental Health Daily blog, see for example http://mentalhealthd...ptoms-timeline/ and http://mentalhealthd...ts-for-anxiety/.

 

As far as repair and recovery goes, you can't beat the basics of just being as healthy as you can be.  Eating lots of fresh fruits and vegetables, good protein, exercise and sleep tend to provide the most sustainable and cumulative benefits.  Taking a high-quality multiple is a good idea too.  Then there supplements like turmeric, green tea, rhodiola, ashwaganda, Lion's Mane and others already mentioned in this thread that can help support brain repair.  Emphasize those kinds of things as opposed to those that promise overnight symptomatic relief ... real progress is slow, but more lasting.

 

I wish you the best.

 

 

 

 



#11 psychejunkie

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Posted 18 June 2016 - 03:42 AM

Dear psychejunkie,

To preface, thank you so much for your reply!

I am looking into the items you mentioned and find your analysis intriguing. I used ginko years ago and it was certainly helpful but I have never tried the others.

Do you have any recommendations as to where I can locate quality sources in the EU for the products you mentioned?

Also, if I considered lowering my dosage for lamictal/tapering off it gradually do you have any recommendations as to what I could take in its stead? I am sure you will tell me to consult with a medical professional, however, their recommendation is to remain on lamictal because bipolar symptoms progress with age but their treatment method seems to deal with the symptoms rather than the cause itself. I have read several studies that show that the combination of uridine +dha+ choline can help with neurological disorders and have shown to assist folks with mood disorders as well (which is why I am taking the combo). *Edit* And I obviously saw Mr. Happy's Stack, should have mentioned that as well, lol.

Your thoughts?

Best and thanks again,

Daniel

-

 

Hey,

 

Your welcome!

 

Unfortunately I don't know of any good sources in EU, but you can trust the brands often mentioned by members here on these forums (like PowderCity.com)

 

Why don't you try those I recommended first? don't be hurry on nootropics!

Bipolar disorder isn't something you joke with!! at least in most of the cases there are more unstable emotional/motivational side-effects from nootropics, specially those enhancing GABA or Glutamate like Racetams!


Edited by psychejunkie, 18 June 2016 - 03:46 AM.


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#12 kurdishfella

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Posted 24 June 2022 - 10:53 PM

some trauma can be beneficial like one person destroyed a part of his brain that created negative emotions/feelings so now he is in a constant positive mood. To repair brain injury it would be good if we could recreate the same condition and environment that pregnancy has. positive Music can also help heal the brain via good strong vibrations even if you are deaf. A lot of people dont know but even before birth during pregnancy a lot of things can go wrong and be born with brain damage that is more obvious later.


Edited by kurdishfella, 24 June 2022 - 10:57 PM.






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