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Am I eating too much Saturated fat?

saturated fat eating too much?

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#1 TheFountain

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 07:40 PM


Hey,

 

I'm currently eating about 25 grams of saturated fat a day, some days maybe about 30 or 35. Mostly from the dark chocolate I eat. Other sources of fat are coming from unfiltered, high polyphenol olive oil. I'd say the other sources are about 30 grams a day also.

 

Carbohydrate content is seldom over 150 grams a day. Sometimes less.

 

 

Am I eating too much Saturated fat?



#2 Nate-2004

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 08:53 PM

There is much debate over saturated fat right now in light of uncovered conflicts of interest and bias in studies around fat in the 20th century. Right now the conclusion is that saturated fat is largely neutral with some possible caveats. So it's really hard to really answer this question. 

 

The ketogenic diet involves lots of sat fat consumption and fat consumption in general yet shows promise in many areas, like reversing cognitive decline, treating movement disorders and preventing seizures among other metabolic improvements.

 

Just ensure you're getting plenty of fiber and plant based foods, especially walnuts and almonds in your diet if your fat intake is high. This will at least offset any lipid peroxidation. The primary issue is oxidized LDL from what I understand so while keeping LDL low is ideal, preventing its oxidation is a better way to focus the effort.

 

Senolytics will play a big role in reducing the effects of this oxidation hopefully.


Edited by Nate-2004, 01 March 2018 - 08:56 PM.

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#3 sthira

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 08:54 PM

I don't know if that's too high or not. Do you still document your diet?

I've cut back on dark chocolate consumption just because it makes me too silly. But if your primary sources of saturated fat are dark chocolate and high-quality olive oil, then those choices are probably healthier than many of the alternatives that I'm sure you know...

Saturated fats raise blood levels of LDL, but this doesn't seem to inevitably lead to increased risk for heart disease. They're not all the same, those saturated fats, and they aren't eaten in isolation. Fats in foods contain varying proportions of specific saturated fatty acids, which have different cardiovascular effects. The saturated fatty acids in chocolate, for instance, are different from those in beef and are more neutral in their effect on blood cholesterol. The same appears to be true of the fatty acids in milk and cheese. I just don't know about separating isolated compounds in foods. Food is complicated.

For reference, I keep a daily tally of what I eat on cronometer, I'm vegan, and when I do a representative crunch for saturated fat I've eaten roughly 14.4g per day during the past 365 days. Dark chocolate, olive oil, avocados, and pumpkin seeds are my 1-4 leading safa sources. But I'm nixing dark chocolate because I'm done with its controversy. And cadmium -- no, no, no...

#4 TheFountain

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 08:56 PM

There is much debate over saturated fat right now in light of uncovered conflicts of interest and bias in studies around fat in the 20th century. Right now the conclusion is that saturated fat is largely neutral with some possible caveats. So it's really hard to really answer this question. 

 

Just ensure you're getting plenty of fiber and plant based foods, especially walnuts and almonds in your diet if your fat intake is high. This will at least offset any lipid peroxidation. The primary issue is oxidized LDL from what I understand so while keeping LDL low is ideal, preventing its oxidation is a better way to focus the effort.

 

Senolytics will play a big role in reducing the effects of this oxidation hopefully.

 

Are you focusing on the Omega 3's in the Walnuts?

 

If so I take a Cod Liver oil supplement every day, which I stack with Tocomin Suprabio. 

 

I'm eating a lot of Broccoli and Arugula right now. Making sure my Potassium intake is at least 2 grams a day with a Magnesium Orotate supp. 

 

What about the stearic vs Palmitic acid debate in SAFA's?


Edited by TheFountain, 01 March 2018 - 08:57 PM.


#5 Nate-2004

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 08:58 PM

 

There is much debate over saturated fat right now in light of uncovered conflicts of interest and bias in studies around fat in the 20th century. Right now the conclusion is that saturated fat is largely neutral with some possible caveats. So it's really hard to really answer this question. 

 

Just ensure you're getting plenty of fiber and plant based foods, especially walnuts and almonds in your diet if your fat intake is high. This will at least offset any lipid peroxidation. The primary issue is oxidized LDL from what I understand so while keeping LDL low is ideal, preventing its oxidation is a better way to focus the effort.

 

Senolytics will play a big role in reducing the effects of this oxidation hopefully.

 

Are you focusing on the Omega 3's in the Walnuts?

 

If so I take a Cod Liver oil supplement every day, which I stack with Tocomin Suprabio. 

 

I'm eating a lot of Broccoli and Arugula right now. Making sure my Potassium intake is at least 2 grams a day witha  Magnesium Orotate supp. 

 

What about the stearic vs Palmitic acid debate in SAFA's?

 

 

No, walnuts and almonds have the highest levels of gamma and alpha tocopherol respectively, almost inversely to each other. They are also quite high in fiber and monounsaturated fats which are neurologically important.


Edited by Nate-2004, 01 March 2018 - 08:58 PM.


#6 TheFountain

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 09:02 PM

 

 

There is much debate over saturated fat right now in light of uncovered conflicts of interest and bias in studies around fat in the 20th century. Right now the conclusion is that saturated fat is largely neutral with some possible caveats. So it's really hard to really answer this question. 

 

Just ensure you're getting plenty of fiber and plant based foods, especially walnuts and almonds in your diet if your fat intake is high. This will at least offset any lipid peroxidation. The primary issue is oxidized LDL from what I understand so while keeping LDL low is ideal, preventing its oxidation is a better way to focus the effort.

 

Senolytics will play a big role in reducing the effects of this oxidation hopefully.

 

Are you focusing on the Omega 3's in the Walnuts?

 

If so I take a Cod Liver oil supplement every day, which I stack with Tocomin Suprabio. 

 

I'm eating a lot of Broccoli and Arugula right now. Making sure my Potassium intake is at least 2 grams a day witha  Magnesium Orotate supp. 

 

What about the stearic vs Palmitic acid debate in SAFA's?

 

 

No, walnuts and almonds have the highest levels of gamma and alpha tocopherol respectively, almost inversely to each other. They are also quite high in fiber and monounsaturated fats which are neurologically important.

 

 

I hear that, what about the Mono in the Olive oil I consume (only unfiltered high phenol stuff) combined with all the vegetable fiber i'm getting? Aren't Walnuts high in PUFA also? I thought they had more Omega 6 than Omega 3. 

 

Are they higher in E than Tocomin Suprabio supplements? 



#7 tunt01

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 09:15 PM

That must be like 3 oz of dark chocolate a day.  500 calories worth.  Seems like a lot of calories to me.  


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#8 Mind

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 09:39 PM

I am in the 30 to 50g saturated fat range on most days. I wonder if that is too much as well. Most of my traditional blood/heart metrics are normal. I really want to get an MRI of my heart to see if I have any signs of heart disease, just too expensive right now.


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#9 tunt01

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 10:51 PM

30-50g is like 1-1.8 oz. Not quite the same.

#10 Nate-2004

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Posted 02 March 2018 - 01:26 AM

 

 

 

There is much debate over saturated fat right now in light of uncovered conflicts of interest and bias in studies around fat in the 20th century. Right now the conclusion is that saturated fat is largely neutral with some possible caveats. So it's really hard to really answer this question. 

 

Just ensure you're getting plenty of fiber and plant based foods, especially walnuts and almonds in your diet if your fat intake is high. This will at least offset any lipid peroxidation. The primary issue is oxidized LDL from what I understand so while keeping LDL low is ideal, preventing its oxidation is a better way to focus the effort.

 

Senolytics will play a big role in reducing the effects of this oxidation hopefully.

 

Are you focusing on the Omega 3's in the Walnuts?

 

If so I take a Cod Liver oil supplement every day, which I stack with Tocomin Suprabio. 

 

I'm eating a lot of Broccoli and Arugula right now. Making sure my Potassium intake is at least 2 grams a day witha  Magnesium Orotate supp. 

 

What about the stearic vs Palmitic acid debate in SAFA's?

 

 

No, walnuts and almonds have the highest levels of gamma and alpha tocopherol respectively, almost inversely to each other. They are also quite high in fiber and monounsaturated fats which are neurologically important.

 

 

I hear that, what about the Mono in the Olive oil I consume (only unfiltered high phenol stuff) combined with all the vegetable fiber i'm getting? Aren't Walnuts high in PUFA also? I thought they had more Omega 6 than Omega 3. 

 

Are they higher in E than Tocomin Suprabio supplements? 

 

The PUFA ratio in walnuts is far far better than in almonds, several thousand orders of magnitude, but still, the actual total amount of PUFA is low relative to other fats in the nut. Same with almonds. It's only like 13% PUFA. Most is mono. It's fine. You can make up for that with fish oil supps and flaxseed.


Edited by Nate-2004, 02 March 2018 - 01:26 AM.


#11 TheFountain

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Posted 02 March 2018 - 03:57 AM

I don't know if that's too high or not. Do you still document your diet?

I've cut back on dark chocolate consumption just because it makes me too silly. But if your primary sources of saturated fat are dark chocolate and high-quality olive oil, then those choices are probably healthier than many of the alternatives that I'm sure you know...

Saturated fats raise blood levels of LDL, but this doesn't seem to inevitably lead to increased risk for heart disease. They're not all the same, those saturated fats, and they aren't eaten in isolation. Fats in foods contain varying proportions of specific saturated fatty acids, which have different cardiovascular effects. The saturated fatty acids in chocolate, for instance, are different from those in beef and are more neutral in their effect on blood cholesterol. The same appears to be true of the fatty acids in milk and cheese. I just don't know about separating isolated compounds in foods. Food is complicated.

For reference, I keep a daily tally of what I eat on cronometer, I'm vegan, and when I do a representative crunch for saturated fat I've eaten roughly 14.4g per day during the past 365 days. Dark chocolate, olive oil, avocados, and pumpkin seeds are my 1-4 leading safa sources. But I'm nixing dark chocolate because I'm done with its controversy. And cadmium -- no, no, no...

I don't document the Minutiae of my diet, but basically what i'm doing is about 150 grams of carbs a day tops, or trying for that. About 70-80 grams of fat a day tops (Mostly neutral fats like the good SAFA's in dark chocolate or Mono from Olive oils high in polyphenol). 

 

I also eat an abundance of greens right now. Broccoli being highest on my list along with Arugula (Get it cheap at trader Joe's). 

 

I do not micro-manage nutrient intake it's far too much work. I figure if most of my normal food consumption is vegetables with some protein and fat mixed in what could I be doing that is so wrong? 

 

What was the controversy with Dark Chocolate? I forgot. 


Edited by TheFountain, 02 March 2018 - 03:58 AM.


#12 TheFountain

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Posted 02 March 2018 - 04:01 AM

That must be like 3 oz of dark chocolate a day.  500 calories worth.  Seems like a lot of calories to me.  

 

The serving size of most Dark Chocolate bars is 2.5 that of the whole bar, which is half or almost half or, in some cases slightly more than half. The calorie density i'm reading on that is just short of 200 calories. 


I am in the 30 to 50g saturated fat range on most days. I wonder if that is too much as well. Most of my traditional blood/heart metrics are normal. I really want to get an MRI of my heart to see if I have any signs of heart disease, just too expensive right now.

Hey mind, Where are you snatching those SAFA's from?

 

On a side note, wasn't Duke Nuke'em on a very high SAFA's diet for a long time? Does anybody know if he's still doing that and doing well on it? I know he was past his 50s.


Edited by TheFountain, 02 March 2018 - 04:29 AM.


#13 Benko

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Posted 02 March 2018 - 04:24 AM

I am in the 30 to 50g saturated fat range on most days. I wonder if that is too much as well. Most of my traditional blood/heart metrics are normal. I really want to get an MRI of my heart to see if I have any signs of heart disease, just too expensive right now.

 

MRA of the heart?  Interesting choice.  

 

You might consider a stress echo.  Echo (echocardiography) because it has no radiation and stress (exercise treadmill test) because you get prognostic information based on how long you are able to exercise. You might be able to talk your doctor into ordering it, so insurance pays.

 

Also what are you gong to do differently based on the test?


Edited by Benko, 02 March 2018 - 04:25 AM.


#14 Mind

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Posted 02 March 2018 - 06:20 PM

 

That must be like 3 oz of dark chocolate a day.  500 calories worth.  Seems like a lot of calories to me.  

 

The serving size of most Dark Chocolate bars is 2.5 that of the whole bar, which is half or almost half or, in some cases slightly more than half. The calorie density i'm reading on that is just short of 200 calories. 


I am in the 30 to 50g saturated fat range on most days. I wonder if that is too much as well. Most of my traditional blood/heart metrics are normal. I really want to get an MRI of my heart to see if I have any signs of heart disease, just too expensive right now.

Hey mind, Where are you snatching those SAFA's from?

 

On a side note, wasn't Duke Nuke'em on a very high SAFA's diet for a long time? Does anybody know if he's still doing that and doing well on it? I know he was past his 50s.

 

 

These are my most common sources of saturated fat during a typical day.

 

2 to 3 tbsp of cooconut oil

.5 to 1 tbsp of butter

1 tbsp of heavy whipping cream (in my coffee)

1/2 cup of yogurt (plain, whole milk yogurt)

A couple servings of nuts (peanuts, walnuts, almonds)

1 serving of meat-based protein (and accompanying saturated fat)

Whatever tiny amounts comeing from hummus, various vegetables, avocados, fruit.

 

I contacted Dukenukem last year and he said his health is still very good.


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#15 Mind

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Posted 02 March 2018 - 06:27 PM

 

I am in the 30 to 50g saturated fat range on most days. I wonder if that is too much as well. Most of my traditional blood/heart metrics are normal. I really want to get an MRI of my heart to see if I have any signs of heart disease, just too expensive right now.

 

MRA of the heart?  Interesting choice.  

 

You might consider a stress echo.  Echo (echocardiography) because it has no radiation and stress (exercise treadmill test) because you get prognostic information based on how long you are able to exercise. You might be able to talk your doctor into ordering it, so insurance pays.

 

Also what are you gong to do differently based on the test?

 

 

Thanks for the suggestions. I have thought about the Echo. From what I have read, the MRI would be the most detailed (and no radiation).

 

If my arteries are clogged, I would chase down some supps that tend to stabilize or reverse build-up, do a couple of longer term fasts (2 to 3 days), and switch from meat to fish. Right now, almost all of the meat I eat is wild (venison) and/or raised naturally (by relatives). All of the fish I eat, I catch myself (mostly trout).


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#16 TheFountain

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Posted 02 March 2018 - 07:38 PM

 

 

That must be like 3 oz of dark chocolate a day.  500 calories worth.  Seems like a lot of calories to me.  

 

The serving size of most Dark Chocolate bars is 2.5 that of the whole bar, which is half or almost half or, in some cases slightly more than half. The calorie density i'm reading on that is just short of 200 calories. 


I am in the 30 to 50g saturated fat range on most days. I wonder if that is too much as well. Most of my traditional blood/heart metrics are normal. I really want to get an MRI of my heart to see if I have any signs of heart disease, just too expensive right now.

Hey mind, Where are you snatching those SAFA's from?

 

On a side note, wasn't Duke Nuke'em on a very high SAFA's diet for a long time? Does anybody know if he's still doing that and doing well on it? I know he was past his 50s.

 

 

These are my most common sources of saturated fat during a typical day.

 

2 to 3 tbsp of cooconut oil

.5 to 1 tbsp of butter

1 tbsp of heavy whipping cream (in my coffee)

1/2 cup of yogurt (plain, whole milk yogurt)

A couple servings of nuts (peanuts, walnuts, almonds)

1 serving of meat-based protein (and accompanying saturated fat)

Whatever tiny amounts comeing from hummus, various vegetables, avocados, fruit.

 

I contacted Dukenukem last year and he said his health is still very good.

 

 

It sounds like 95% of your SAFA intake is from the 'good' sources as opposed to the pro-inflammatory sources (which seem to be meat based?).

 

I think Dukenukem is the main example we have of an older guy living for years on a Paleo styled diet without issue.

 

Did you ever do the 23andme thing? What were your results as far as which diet you should subsist on?



#17 TheFountain

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Posted 02 March 2018 - 07:41 PM

 

 

I am in the 30 to 50g saturated fat range on most days. I wonder if that is too much as well. Most of my traditional blood/heart metrics are normal. I really want to get an MRI of my heart to see if I have any signs of heart disease, just too expensive right now.

 

MRA of the heart?  Interesting choice.  

 

You might consider a stress echo.  Echo (echocardiography) because it has no radiation and stress (exercise treadmill test) because you get prognostic information based on how long you are able to exercise. You might be able to talk your doctor into ordering it, so insurance pays.

 

Also what are you gong to do differently based on the test?

 

 

Thanks for the suggestions. I have thought about the Echo. From what I have read, the MRI would be the most detailed (and no radiation).

 

If my arteries are clogged, I would chase down some supps that tend to stabilize or reverse build-up, do a couple of longer term fasts (2 to 3 days), and switch from meat to fish. Right now, almost all of the meat I eat is wild (venison) and/or raised naturally (by relatives). All of the fish I eat, I catch myself (mostly trout).

 

 

Just curious, what makes you think your arteries could be clogged? Paranoia? Or any actual evidence? You said you had  negative stress test right? 



#18 Benko

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Posted 02 March 2018 - 09:10 PM

 

 

I am in the 30 to 50g saturated fat range on most days. I wonder if that is too much as well. Most of my traditional blood/heart metrics are normal. I really want to get an MRI of my heart to see if I have any signs of heart disease, just too expensive right now.

 

MRA of the heart?  Interesting choice.  

 

You might consider a stress echo.  Echo (echocardiography) because it has no radiation and stress (exercise treadmill test) because you get prognostic information based on how long you are able to exercise. You might be able to talk your doctor into ordering it, so insurance pays.

 

Also what are you gong to do differently based on the test?

 

 

Thanks for the suggestions. I have thought about the Echo. From what I have read, the MRI would be the most detailed (and no radiation).

 

If my arteries are clogged, I would chase down some supps that tend to stabilize or reverse build-up, do a couple of longer term fasts (2 to 3 days), and switch from meat to fish. Right now, almost all of the meat I eat is wild (venison) and/or raised naturally (by relatives). All of the fish I eat, I catch myself (mostly trout).

 

 

 

The issue is that you are talking about very small arteries and those arteries are in your chest which is involved with movement from breathing..  CT(with radiation)  images faster and can image those arteries well (I used to interpret those studies so I know what I'm talking about).  CT and MRI image similarly sized small arteries in the brain well, but the issue of respiration makes coronary artery MRA trickier. I don't know if the technology of coronary artery MRA is good enough for routine clinical use, or perhaps it is but only if done at major university radiology/cardiology dept. 

 



#19 TheFountain

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 12:12 AM

In Response to Nate.

 

Walnut
Nut
A walnut is the nut of any tree of the genus Juglans, particularly the Persian or English walnut, Juglans regia. Technically a walnut is the seed of a drupe or drupaceous nut, and thus not a true botanical nut. Wikipedia
 
Nutrition Facts
WalnutsWalnuts, black, driedWalnuts
 
Amount Per 1 cup, in shell, edible yield (7 nuts) (28 g)1 oz (14 halves) (28.4 g)1 cup, ground (80 g)1 cup shelled (50 halves) (100 g)100 grams1 cup, chopped (117 g)1 cup pieces or chips (120 g)1 oz (14 halves) (28.4 g)
 
Calories 185

% Daily Value* Total Fat 18 g 27% Saturated fat 1.7 g 8% Polyunsaturated fat 13 g   Monounsaturated fat 2.5 g
 
_________________________

 

What Ratio of that 13 Grams of PUFA is omega 3 in this Example? 


Edited by TheFountain, 03 March 2018 - 12:13 AM.


#20 TheFountain

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 03:10 AM

And guys check this review out and give me your opinions. It seems to indicate that most fats, short of transfatty acids have no association with increase in heart disease risk, in fact it shows that one type of Saturated fat reduced the risk of heart disease and that arachinonic acid in Omega 6's ALSO shows a reduced risk. 

 

 

http://www.drbriffa....at-in-the-diet/

 

 


Edited by TheFountain, 03 March 2018 - 03:10 AM.


#21 Mind

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 11:57 PM

No 23andMe test yet. I have only taken the Osiris Green DNA methylation test, which is offered at a great discount to LongeCity members.

 

 


Edited by Mind, 03 March 2018 - 11:57 PM.


#22 Mind

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 12:01 AM

 

 

 

I am in the 30 to 50g saturated fat range on most days. I wonder if that is too much as well. Most of my traditional blood/heart metrics are normal. I really want to get an MRI of my heart to see if I have any signs of heart disease, just too expensive right now.

 

MRA of the heart?  Interesting choice.  

 

You might consider a stress echo.  Echo (echocardiography) because it has no radiation and stress (exercise treadmill test) because you get prognostic information based on how long you are able to exercise. You might be able to talk your doctor into ordering it, so insurance pays.

 

Also what are you gong to do differently based on the test?

 

 

Thanks for the suggestions. I have thought about the Echo. From what I have read, the MRI would be the most detailed (and no radiation).

 

If my arteries are clogged, I would chase down some supps that tend to stabilize or reverse build-up, do a couple of longer term fasts (2 to 3 days), and switch from meat to fish. Right now, almost all of the meat I eat is wild (venison) and/or raised naturally (by relatives). All of the fish I eat, I catch myself (mostly trout).

 

 

Just curious, what makes you think your arteries could be clogged? Paranoia? Or any actual evidence? You said you had  negative stress test right? 

 

 

Just getting a little older and even though the evidence that saturated fat causes heart disease is not very strong (some would argue nearly non-existent), it is common for medical professionals, nutritionists, and media outlets to shriek in horror at the thought of eating saturated fat. Can't block it all out. Can't hurt to check.


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#23 ceridwen

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 05:44 AM

@Mind are we supposed to report our findings on the methylation test? I was tested by 23 and me.

#24 Mind

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 06:32 PM

@Mind are we supposed to report our findings on the methylation test? I was tested by 23 and me.

 

If you are referring to the Community Testing of Aging Bio-Markers, then it would be great if you could eventually contribute any recent DNA methylation tests you have obtained, but the program has not officially started yet. I have to secure the grant and get legal arrangements in place.



#25 TheFountain

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 03:16 AM

Mind.

 

Did you have a stress test done? How much confidence do you have in a basic treadmill test?



#26 Mind

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Posted 05 March 2018 - 08:15 PM

Mind.

 

Did you have a stress test done? How much confidence do you have in a basic treadmill test?

 

No stress test, but I definitely have that on my agenda.



#27 TheFountain

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Posted 06 March 2018 - 05:31 AM

 

Mind.

 

Did you have a stress test done? How much confidence do you have in a basic treadmill test?

 

No stress test, but I definitely have that on my agenda.

 

 It's better to do it and get it off your mind and focus on worthwhile endeavors right? Even if everything's alright, it's peace of mind. 



#28 Rosanna

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Posted 09 March 2018 - 12:38 AM

Mind

 

just to say I was really worried about my stress echo (which I asked for due to my heart 'skipping' at times and I had some swelling on my ankles since being on beta blockers.....for the heart skips....circular issue, lol, I'm now weaning off).......Due to the beta blockers I currently have very little exercise tolerance....but strangely enough, despite feeling like I'd climbed a mountain, I passed the stress echo.  

 

I know it doesn't check out things in as much detail as one would like, but it is a good start and gives peace of mind for the time being.  :-)



#29 mccoy

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Posted 09 March 2018 - 12:12 PM

As far as I anecdotally experienced, I used to ingest a significant amount of SAFAs (edit: 36 g per day) as a lacto-ovo (from cheese, yogurt, chocolate and butter mainly) and displayed a good lipid profile. That was my case before eating vegan. I believe it was the high amount of phytosterols, fiber, EVOO, fruit and vegetables with all the protective phytochemicals therein.

 

Now my weekly average as a vegan is 26 g day-1, and I suppose my lipid profile should be even better. But I'm going to check it. Mainly EVOO, chocolate and cacao, nuts, soymilk. Even as a vegan it seems hard to drop below 15-20 g day-1 SAFAs, unless you follow McDougall's suggestions and have no EVOO nor nuts and check your chocolate as well.

 

But those are mainly healthy fats as Dr. Valter Longo, who nearly got the nobel prize, writes:

 

 

Healthy fats: EVOO, all nuts and seeds, avocados, olives....


Edited by mccoy, 09 March 2018 - 12:21 PM.


#30 mccoy

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Posted 09 March 2018 - 12:16 PM

By the way, I'm 57, I was able to retrieve my data as a lacto OVO, interestingly even as I ate less carbs blood glucose was the same as presently that I eat lots of carbs. 

Again, the protective plant-derived hormetic compounds seem to work.

 

This dates back to october 2016, from post in the CR society forum:https://www.crsociet...lacto +profile:

 

Glucose: 86

Total cholesterol: 153

HDL : 59

Triglycerides: <70

LDL : 80

 

Evidently, full fat dairy products if eaten in moderate quantities, by a not-overweight person who ingests lots of phytochemicals, are not damaging. Also, probably there is not any genetic drawbacks. 

Also, since I've diligently recorded on Cronometer all my meals, I can average the characteristics of the ingested lipids in the latest ten days. About 40% of the saturated fats ingested are of animal origin, otherwise they are from plant-based foods. Omega3/6 ratio is on average 1/6 or 1/7. I ate about one egg per day lately, although I'm decreasing this amount. MUFAs are high probably because of my intake of EVOO.

 

MEDIAN VALUES latest 10 days, in grams

 

Total lipids: 124

MUFA: 63

PUFA: 19

SAFA: 36

 

 

Total lipids now as a vegan are 156 grams, I increased calories since I've been working out and exposing myself to cold temperatures.

 


Edited by mccoy, 09 March 2018 - 12:19 PM.






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