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What Are Your Top 10 Longevity Interventions?

longevity top 10 best interventions index

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#1 it99ts

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 08:53 AM


If you could...I'd like to know your Top 10 Longevity Interventions?

 

I've become increasingly intrigued by the aspect of longevity. By longevity what I mean is the eventual realisation of indefinite youthful life; to live disease free and not succumb to eventual physiological breakdown. To me this seems a "no brainer" and moreover a forgone logical conclusion; indeed a birthright.  

 

With that being said, I’m firmly in the camp that there is no “proven” intervention available or procurable today that provides significant relief from the boundaries imposed by genetics, historical lifestyle choices and environment. That’s not to say these boundaries will persist into the future. However, today, as I write, I’m a realist and that means being cognisant of plausible scenarios in the next 30 years.  

 

I will not pretend to be an expert in this vast and deep field, but I believe I’ve made some rudimentary changes to give myself a “plausible” chance. I’m turning 39, I live fairly healthy, I: 

 

  • don’t smoke
  • don’t do drugs
  • glug wine rarely
  • resistance train to maintain bone and build mass (late to the weight training game alas)
  • eat protein sub 130g (bring down to 50g - 70g when muscle mass falls into a better percentile)
  • eat carbs in the range of 50g - 75g per day
  • maintain low visceral fat (dexa verified)
  • sleep well
  • fast for 16 hours
  • drink lots of water
  • etc

 

I do have a supplementation stack but I’d like to avoid listing specific active ingredients unless there’s a strong case to be made. 

 

My focus, instead, is with the paradigm that: big needle swings are usually simple, obvious and often right under our very nose.

 

So - what I’d like to ask is:

 

What are your Top 10 Longevity Interventions?

  • How did you arrive at that conclusion?
  • What paradigms/frameworks did you employ?
  • Is there any research that influenced you?


#2 male_1978

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 09:30 AM

I will omit points which fall under a "healty lifestyle" because its obvios that smoking, too much sun or alcohol is bad. 

 

 

But in my oppinion its a good strategy to take supplements, fast or do excercise to raise the NAD+-Level. Why? Because there seems to be evidence that more Nad+ protects the genes, helps avoid mutations and repair stuff.  We already know that exercise is good for the body and it seems that Nad+- increasing molecules affect more or less the same pathways. To me this is evidence enough that increasing the Nad+-Level is helpful. Of course, there is no guarantee.

 

 

However, i am not a medical doctor, i have only an opinion based on articles i have read.


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#3 it99ts

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 06:06 PM

I will omit points which fall under a "healty lifestyle" because its obvios that smoking, too much sun or alcohol is bad. 

 

 

But in my oppinion its a good strategy to take supplements, fast or do excercise to raise the NAD+-Level. Why? Because there seems to be evidence that more Nad+ protects the genes, helps avoid mutations and repair stuff.  We already know that exercise is good for the body and it seems that Nad+- increasing molecules affect more or less the same pathways. To me this is evidence enough that increasing the Nad+-Level is helpful. Of course, there is no guarantee.

 

 

However, i am not a medical doctor, i have only an opinion based on articles i have read.

 

Thanks for coming back. So - I actually take NAD and am aware of some of the research around it. With that being said I'm super hesitant to assert it will for surely add decades to my life - it may do, it may not do!

 

If you could - what are "healthy lifestyles" point that you've omitted?

 

And, why do some interventions fall into the set of "healthy lifestyle choices" and some classified outside that that set? I know this question may sound mundane and somewhat fuzzy - and perhaps there is no one answer - surely anything conducive to health is a "healthy lifestyle choice"???



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#4 male_1978

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 08:37 PM

If you could - what are "healthy lifestyles" point that you've omitted?

 

 

1) Dont smoke

2) Dont drink

3) Get enough sleep

4) Do enough excercise

5) Dont get too much sun or sunburn

6) Dont eat too much sugar/ fat / carbohydrates

7) Dont have too much stress in life

 

 

Thats normal healthy lifestyle.

Artifical/ additional stuff is Nad-Boosting pills or resveratrol which i tried earlier.

 

Oh, what also works (but not at the root of the problem) are pills with hyaluronic acid (makes the skin smoother) or creams with retinol /tretinoin (makes the skin for firm).


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#5 Oakman

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 12:48 AM

Your list is a pretty point on. Stepping back a bit (big needle et al), the best motivator towards personal action is knowledge.

 

1) Become self-aware of your individual physical and mental nature

2) Take the time to learn what healthy is

3) Study the research and ...

3) Make a plan to achieve your longevity based goals

4) Test, verify, learn, recalibrate. Repeat.


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#6 it99ts

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 09:10 AM

Thanks for your replies guys. I've been dwelling on this problem for a while now and I think I have a framework that seems to make sense:

 

Longevity Framework

 

1) Cease Health Damaging Activities

To live is to accumulate damage - I get that totally. But there are activities that accelerate damage or cause new damage - that's what I mean by (1)

 

2) Execute For Long Term Preservation

The fact is - once something breaks down in your physiology - chances are that it’s irrecoverable and irreplaceable - at least today. Biological Machine Breakdown is inevitable and, at least from a macro view, one way. So, to me, (2) is about reducing one’s natural speed of physiological breakdown.

 

3) Increase Demand For Longevity 

Increased Demand + Awareness = More Funding = Longevity Happening Sooner. Over the last few years I’m bemused that this is sort of a fringe activity. Why is it that a lot more people have not aligned themselves towards helping Longevity realisation?



#7 caliban

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Posted 18 May 2018 - 09:36 PM

we are planning a longecity project that aims to gather a list of life-prolonging factors and the evidence for them

 

 

there are plenty of lifestyle factors with proven significance that are often overlooked  

-- quality of social network -- healthcare system -- economic security  --emergency awareness  --car safety --air quality --health screening    

 


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#8 RWhigham

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Posted 19 May 2018 - 01:18 AM

  Pauling-Rath protocol - clear arteries w Vit C & L-lysine
  Doug McGuff protocol - maximize muscle mass w 10 min exercise every 9 days
  Tim Ferriss PAGG protocol - to cut abdominal/visceral fat
  Jeff Bowles protocol - reduce aging w Hyaluronic_ac, melatonin, pregnenolone, & DHEA
  Blagosklonny protocol - reduce aging w rapamycin, metformin, ARB, cialis, aspirin
  Uric acid protocol - reduce UA w coffee, red tart cherries, tiny dose allopurinol
  MAO-B protocol - reduce MAO-B to young level w 2.5 mg deprenyl MWF
  Increase nucular_NAD+  - raise nuc_NAD+ bimonthly w apigenin & EMIQ quercetin 
  Increase cytosolic NAD+ - raise MWF w bedtime OPC_Grape_seed_extract, niacinamide, ribose, lithium or NR
  Increase Sirt1 & Sirt6 - raise w fucoidan, candesartan, olive leaf extract  (only works when there is enough NAD+ available)
  Mitochondria preservation - C60_EVOO, CoQ10, Astaxanthin, & occasional hyperfission protocol
  Hyperfission protocol - inhibit fusion & stimulate fission for 24 hr  Stem cell maintenance - stearic acid & to be determined
  Stem cell preservation - stearic acid &?
  Inflammation protocol - At bedtime 3.2 mg Naltrexone, 100 mcg Methylene_blue
  Splicing errors reduction - Rapamycin, Methylene Blue, & Sulforaphane   (splicing errors cause progeria,part of  aging is slow progeria)
      Splicing errors in humans increase w age, a type of programmed aging
  Telomere maintenance  - reduce replicative senescence, another type of programmed aging invented by protists 1-2 billion yrs ago
      Rapamycin  - reduces replicative senescence (from short telomeres)
      DHA/EPA
      Exercise - build and maintain good muscle mass
      Low BMI (20), 10% body fat
      Keep hormones young w Jeff Bowles protocol 
      Avoid
        processed meats (including cured bacon)
        smoking
        polyunsaturated fats (in vegetable oils, exp. omega-6 linoleic acid in canola oil for example)
        abdominal & visceral fat - aim for BMI 20 and 10% body fat
        arterial calcification - use Pauling-Rath protocol + vitamins D3 & K to eliminate plaque
   Apoptosis signaling - possibly from old age hormone profile, another type of programmed aging invented by protists 1-2 billion yrs ago

Edited by RWhigham, 19 May 2018 - 01:50 AM.

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#9 male_1978

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Posted 19 May 2018 - 07:24 AM

we are planning a longecity project that aims to gather a list of life-prolonging factors and the evidence for them

 

 

there are plenty of lifestyle factors with proven significance that are often overlooked  

-- quality of social network -- healthcare system -- economic security  --emergency awareness  --car safety --air quality --health screening    

 

Let me share a few thoughts on this.

First to an average person the number of such factors  (supplements, lifestyle choices) can be a bit too much and too confusing. What i would love to see would be at least a priorization or an estimate how much something helps. A "normal" person would also not be willing to take 10 pills a day, which are likely to have a positive impact on health. This is the biggest problem for me at the moment when i read stuff like in this forum: Too much is simply confusing.

 

The second thing is that several factors might affect the same pathway, so the question would be whether their effect is additive or not.

 

Third, i think that a "longer life" is not exactly what everyone is looking for, its more slowing down or reversing aspects of aging, ranging from effects like softer skin to  better cognition at the macro scale or from less DNA damage to less inflammation at the cellular scale. Some of these effects might not really prolong life but still might be desirable, like being healthy and looking younger for longer.


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#10 Mind

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Posted 20 May 2018 - 05:19 PM

Not saying this is optimum, but it is what I am doing right now.

 

1. Reduce caloric intake (via intermittent fasting)

2. Exercise (all types

3. Diet. Balanced and nutritious. Low carb.

4. Minimize risk of accidental death (no free climbing cliffs)

5. Adequate sleep

6. vitamin D3

7. Fish oil.

8. Low dose lithium

9. Resveratrol (one of the higher rated commmercial blends with IP6 and a few other things.)

10. MitoQ/CoQ10


Edited by Mind, 26 January 2019 - 02:06 PM.


#11 Oakman

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Posted 20 May 2018 - 06:38 PM

Let me share a few thoughts on this.

First to an average person the number of such factors  (supplements, lifestyle choices) can be a bit too much and too confusing. What i would love to see would be at least a priorization or an estimate how much something helps. A "normal" person would also not be willing to take 10 pills a day, which are likely to have a positive impact on health. This is the biggest problem for me at the moment when i read stuff like in this forum: Too much is simply confusing.

 

The second thing is that several factors might affect the same pathway, so the question would be whether their effect is additive or not.

 

Third, i think that a "longer life" is not exactly what everyone is looking for, its more slowing down or reversing aspects of aging, ranging from effects like softer skin to  better cognition at the macro scale or from less DNA damage to less inflammation at the cellular scale. Some of these effects might not really prolong life but still might be desirable, like being healthy and looking younger for longer.

 

I agree these point are problematic, esp. the confusion over what to do, and the number of supps that might need to be taken. A big problem is researchers are not even sure of the various mechanisms and pathways themselves!

 

The current focus on "the one magical longevity supplement" above all others is also a big part of the problem. Of course this is driven by individual and corporate greed. The likely 'real longevity pill' would comprise a complex of longevity factors, not just one like NR or NMN, or the like. How to get the involved entities to put their rivalries aside and focus on the end result (aka > all of us and our longevity and/or healthspan!!) is likely more of a problem than the compound itself. 



#12 sthira

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Posted 20 May 2018 - 06:45 PM

(no free climbing cliffs)


Bouldering has made me super strong all over, it works out everything: hands, arms, shoulders, hips, legs, feet, and the mental challenge of calm limb placement can be a breathing meditation. When I fall, it's on a mat and only a short distance from rock to earth. Controlling the fall may be beneficial, too. George Church has talked about editing genes related to gravity -- for future explorers, lucky them. But I read if we can survive this biological mess until 2050 we may have a chance at radical life extension -- I'd like to explore outer space with extra time in a synthetic body that has very few material needs.
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#13 it99ts

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Posted 20 May 2018 - 08:08 PM

we are planning a longecity project that aims to gather a list of life-prolonging factors and the evidence for them

 

 

there are plenty of lifestyle factors with proven significance that are often overlooked  

-- quality of social network -- healthcare system -- economic security  --emergency awareness  --car safety --air quality --health screening    

 

Thanks for coming back. This is exactly what I'm planning - a list - a maintained dynamic list!


Edited by it99ts, 20 May 2018 - 08:09 PM.

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#14 Mind

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Posted 20 May 2018 - 08:12 PM

Here is where you can sign up for a free test of your aging biomarkers (mentioned earlier): https://www.longecit...esting-support/



#15 it99ts

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Posted 20 May 2018 - 08:16 PM

 

  Pauling-Rath protocol - clear arteries w Vit C & L-lysine
  Doug McGuff protocol - maximize muscle mass w 10 min exercise every 9 days
  Tim Ferriss PAGG protocol - to cut abdominal/visceral fat
  Jeff Bowles protocol - reduce aging w Hyaluronic_ac, melatonin, pregnenolone, & DHEA
  Blagosklonny protocol - reduce aging w rapamycin, metformin, ARB, cialis, aspirin
  Uric acid protocol - reduce UA w coffee, red tart cherries, tiny dose allopurinol
  MAO-B protocol - reduce MAO-B to young level w 2.5 mg deprenyl MWF
  Increase nucular_NAD+  - raise nuc_NAD+ bimonthly w apigenin & EMIQ quercetin 
  Increase cytosolic NAD+ - raise MWF w bedtime OPC_Grape_seed_extract, niacinamide, ribose, lithium or NR
  Increase Sirt1 & Sirt6 - raise w fucoidan, candesartan, olive leaf extract  (only works when there is enough NAD+ available)
  Mitochondria preservation - C60_EVOO, CoQ10, Astaxanthin, & occasional hyperfission protocol
  Hyperfission protocol - inhibit fusion & stimulate fission for 24 hr  Stem cell maintenance - stearic acid & to be determined
  Stem cell preservation - stearic acid &?
  Inflammation protocol - At bedtime 3.2 mg Naltrexone, 100 mcg Methylene_blue
  Splicing errors reduction - Rapamycin, Methylene Blue, & Sulforaphane   (splicing errors cause progeria,part of  aging is slow progeria)
      Splicing errors in humans increase w age, a type of programmed aging
  Telomere maintenance  - reduce replicative senescence, another type of programmed aging invented by protists 1-2 billion yrs ago
      Rapamycin  - reduces replicative senescence (from short telomeres)
      DHA/EPA
      Exercise - build and maintain good muscle mass
      Low BMI (20), 10% body fat
      Keep hormones young w Jeff Bowles protocol 
      Avoid
        processed meats (including cured bacon)
        smoking
        polyunsaturated fats (in vegetable oils, exp. omega-6 linoleic acid in canola oil for example)
        abdominal & visceral fat - aim for BMI 20 and 10% body fat
        arterial calcification - use Pauling-Rath protocol + vitamins D3 & K to eliminate plaque
   Apoptosis signaling - possibly from old age hormone profile, another type of programmed aging invented by protists 1-2 billion yrs ago

 

 

wow - this list is really good - thanks - I'd like admit half of the list is new to me - will need to get reading. Big respect to Dr Doug McGuff book!


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#16 it99ts

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Posted 20 May 2018 - 08:37 PM

Let me share a few thoughts on this.

First to an average person the number of such factors  (supplements, lifestyle choices) can be a bit too much and too confusing. What i would love to see would be at least a priorization or an estimate how much something helps. A "normal" person would also not be willing to take 10 pills a day, which are likely to have a positive impact on health. This is the biggest problem for me at the moment when i read stuff like in this forum: Too much is simply confusing.

 

The second thing is that several factors might affect the same pathway, so the question would be whether their effect is additive or not.

 

Third, i think that a "longer life" is not exactly what everyone is looking for, its more slowing down or reversing aspects of aging, ranging from effects like softer skin to  better cognition at the macro scale or from less DNA damage to less inflammation at the cellular scale. Some of these effects might not really prolong life but still might be desirable, like being healthy and looking younger for longer.

 

Defo - agree - if I try to talk about this with a newbie it just scares the bat shit out of them and personally I don't think I'd do myself any benefit in the PR department. They just swim in a different soup and throwing NAD+ research - for example - makes them close down.

 

The other problem in my opinion is that most people are just scientifically weak - most people don't get - abstractly albeit - DNA, transcription, translation, amino acids, proteins, protein folding, DNA methylation, epigenetics, etc and so I wonder how are they even gonna get NAD+ research.

 

My approach with a newbie now is to make the case: life is precious, don't be precarious, and therefore cease damaging your health!



#17 aribadabar

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Posted 22 May 2018 - 02:16 AM

Not saying this is optimum, but it is what I am doing right now.

 

1. Reduce caloric intake (via intermittent fasting)

2. Exercise (all types

3. Diet. Balanced and nutritious. Low carb.

4. Minimize risk of accidental death (no free climbing cliffs)

5. Low dose aspirin.

6. vitamin D3

7. Fish oil.

8. Low dose lithium

9. Resveratrol (one of the higher rated commmercial blends with IP6 and a few other things.)

10. MitoQ/CoQ10

 

I can only touch upon on a few points :
 

- D3 needs to be coupled with K2 to drive Ca where it needs to be - away from arteries and into bones

- Resveratrol seems too flakey for a top 10 intervention especially in 2018. It may help somewhat but Pterostilbene is a better analog if we are to stay within the stilbene family. Otherwise NR/NMN is a much better pick IMO.

 

That being said, all these interventions will hardly make a big dent into normal healthy aging as there is nothing truly age-reversing in them. Aging retardation by 10yrs at best.

 

 


Edited by aribadabar, 22 May 2018 - 02:24 AM.

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#18 it99ts

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Posted 22 May 2018 - 08:30 AM

I can only touch upon on a few points :
 

- D3 needs to be coupled with K2 to drive Ca where it needs to be - away from arteries and into bones

- Resveratrol seems too flakey for a top 10 intervention especially in 2018. It may help somewhat but Pterostilbene is a better analog if we are to stay within the stilbene family. Otherwise NR/NMN is a much better pick IMO.

 

That being said, all these interventions will hardly make a big dent into normal healthy aging as there is nothing truly age-reversing in them. Aging retardation by 10yrs at best.

 

I'm thinking of adding K2 to my stack. Thanks for this.

 

So what are you "healthy aging" reccomendations?



#19 Granite Ghouls

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Posted 29 September 2018 - 10:44 AM

Stop smoking

Less Soda

Less Beer

Less Radiation (TV, Smart Phone, Laptop)

Healthy Diet

Regular Gym

Quarter Doctor visit

Stop Trolling the Internet, Social Media

 

 


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#20 AceNZ

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Posted 23 January 2019 - 07:57 AM

  1. Minimize exposure to toxic chemicals in my air and water (even micro-levels of toxins affect the immune system)
  2. Pesticide-free, locally grown food whenever possible
  3. GAPS diet to optimize gut and brain health while reducing insulin and lowering weight (bone broth, meat, veggies; no sugar, grains or seeds)
  4. Walk for 30 minutes, at least 5 days/week, in full sun when possible
  5. Functional Medicine: using lab tests to identify metabolic, hormonal or nutritional problems, supplement or medicate to fix, re-test to check
  6. Healthspan-supporting supplements (in addition to those indicated by lab tests), supported by research
  7. Lifespan-supporting supplements or drugs: Resveratrol, NR, NMN, etc.
  8. Coffee enemas. Sounds crazy, I know, but they changed my life. (Increases Glutathione production, among other things).
  9. Constant reading, learning and adapting. Try hard to not get stuck in old ways of thinking.
  10. Live a relatively low-stress life, doing things I enjoy

 


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#21 RWhigham

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Posted 25 January 2019 - 04:42 PM

Microscopic tumors can take 50 yr to mutate into cancer via accumulated DNA-damage - change that to 500 yr by taking a daily aspirin.

 

In this study of benign tumors a daily aspirin slowed the rate of DNA-damage within the tumors 10-fold

Aspirin May Fight Cancer by Slowing DNA Damage

NSAIDs Modulate Clonal Evolution in Barrett's Esophagus

 


Edited by RWhigham, 25 January 2019 - 04:45 PM.

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#22 AceNZ

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Posted 25 January 2019 - 08:49 PM

Microscopic tumors can take 50 yr to mutate into cancer via accumulated DNA-damage - change that to 500 yr by taking a daily aspirin.

 

In this study of benign tumors a daily aspirin slowed the rate of DNA-damage within the tumors 10-fold

Aspirin May Fight Cancer by Slowing DNA Damage

NSAIDs Modulate Clonal Evolution in Barrett's Esophagus

 

The problem I have with aspirin is that it makes your stomach bleed every time you take it (even at low doses), and the risks associated with that bleeding seem to increase with age.

 

For example:

https://www.ncbi.nlm...gov/pubmed/6499

 

How can we balance that risk against the longevity benefits?


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#23 RWhigham

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 03:46 AM

AceNZ, I take White-Willow bark extract for 75 mg of Salicin which (if I recall correctly) is converted into aspirin after absorption - no stomach bleed.


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#24 AceNZ

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 05:13 AM

AceNZ, I take White-Willow bark extract for 75 mg of Salicin which (if I recall correctly) is converted into aspirin after absorption - no stomach bleed.

 

I've heard about that, though I've never tried it. Would be nice to see some confirmation that it behaves the same as aspirin when it comes to longevity. There have been too many cases where something that superficially appears to be biochemically similar or "one step away" produces dramatically different results.


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#25 ceridwen

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 04:24 PM

I do think that the illnesses suffered by my adopted Mother macular degeneration and strokes were directly caused by her regularly taking mini aspirin. These illnesses are side effects of aspirin. She was 93 when she died though.
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#26 Droplet

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Posted 27 January 2019 - 07:20 AM

Whilst I do take a few supplements, I just exercise at least twice a week and eat sensibly without totally omitting the naughty but nice food. :) I am teetotal and don't smoke.My job is minium pay so I couldn't afford much in the way of intervention even if I wanted to at present. I currently take burdock, black raspberry, vitamin D, aspirin and COQ10. The vitamin D and aspirin are taken under medical advice and I am taking Atorvostatin and Pregablin for long term conditions as prescribed by a doctor.

I keep my brain busy and I am studying at present. May be a load of rubbish but I just think of my age as a number and don't mope about saying "I'm old" like many other women I've known in their mid thirties -I seem to see that it brings said people down and it may be rubbish but I find that not thinking like that makes me feel better and younger.

Edited by Droplet, 27 January 2019 - 07:22 AM.


#27 it99ts

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Posted 01 February 2019 - 01:24 PM

I for one have concluded that high levels of fitness performance comes at a cost of longevity.

 

What do people think about the performance vs longevity tradeoff???



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#28 Oakman

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Posted 01 February 2019 - 03:27 PM

Even if (not sure what you mean by "high") fitness levels compromises longevity, then still count me in. Because lack of fitness brings on frailty, sarcopenia, and overall lack of function in the aged, at least as best I can see with my own eyes. Just look around you in life.

 

For instance, would you prefer to live a pain-filled life as a frail, diseased person unable to function and perform daily activities, until you die one day a mere shadow of your former young self... or live to the fullest, with strength, vigor, and still being able to do activities that you want for as long as you want... and then simply expire whilst enjoying life?

 

Seems the majority in the present day world have chosen the former, which goes to show most people make bad life decisions, sadly.


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