Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Nicorette or Nicotine gum is bad


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 pinballwizard

  • Registered User
  • 304 posts
  • 1

Posted 11 March 2007 - 08:12 PM


For the last couple years dentists accused me of grinding my teeth, aka bruxism. It turns out it is the STIFF TOUGH chewing gum of nicorette. It caused some serious trauma to my teeth. I have cracks in a couple teeth. I have exposed dentin.

It firsts starts out that your teeth are sensitive at the base where the gum meets the teeth. Why? Imagine king kong shaking the empire state building... the windows on the bottom floors would burst first.

If you chew the gum on a regular basis, switch to lozenges. Don't use nicorette more the prescribed time. I have been chewing the stuff for a number of years.

#2 niner

  • Member, Moderator
  • 14,730 posts
  • 3,593
  • Location:Philadelphia

Posted 12 March 2007 - 02:16 AM

I grind my teeth at night, so I've started wearing a night guard. I hated it at first, but now I'm pretty used to it. I also chewed nicorette for a while. While nicorette is a bit tougher than regular chewing gum, it isn't going to do the kind of damage that bruxism does. Your dentists have diagnosed bruxism; why do you refuse to believe them? I had the same sensitivity that you describe. After wearing the night guard for a couple months, it has gone away. (I haven't chewed nicorette in years.) The damage that I did before I got the night guard is done though, it isn't going away unless I spend lots of money. Deal with your bruxism or eventually you will have nothing but nubs.

sponsored ad

  • Advert

#3 pinballwizard

  • Registered User
  • 304 posts
  • 1

Posted 07 March 2008 - 03:59 AM

I grind my teeth at night, so I've started wearing a night guard. I hated it at first, but now I'm pretty used to it. I also chewed nicorette for a while. While nicorette is a bit tougher than regular chewing gum, it isn't going to do the kind of damage that bruxism does. Your dentists have diagnosed bruxism; why do you refuse to believe them? I had the same sensitivity that you describe. After wearing the night guard for a couple months, it has gone away. (I haven't chewed nicorette in years.) The damage that I did before I got the night guard is done though, it isn't going away unless I spend lots of money. Deal with your bruxism or eventually you will have nothing but nubs.


You were mostly right here and I was mostly wrong. I have been using a night guard for a long time now. The nicotine gum does not help if it is the stiff kind though. gum itself is not that great if you have bruxism.

I am just updating people on side-effects. If you dont grind, I guess it is not a problem, certainly if you dont have stiff generic nic gum.

#4 hamishm00

  • Registered User
  • 945 posts
  • 75
  • Location:United Arab Emirates

Posted 17 March 2008 - 11:58 AM

I grind my teeth at night, so I've started wearing a night guard. I hated it at first, but now I'm pretty used to it. I also chewed nicorette for a while. While nicorette is a bit tougher than regular chewing gum, it isn't going to do the kind of damage that bruxism does. Your dentists have diagnosed bruxism; why do you refuse to believe them? I had the same sensitivity that you describe. After wearing the night guard for a couple months, it has gone away. (I haven't chewed nicorette in years.) The damage that I did before I got the night guard is done though, it isn't going away unless I spend lots of money. Deal with your bruxism or eventually you will have nothing but nubs.


You were mostly right here and I was mostly wrong. I have been using a night guard for a long time now. The nicotine gum does not help if it is the stiff kind though. gum itself is not that great if you have bruxism.

I am just updating people on side-effects. If you dont grind, I guess it is not a problem, certainly if you dont have stiff generic nic gum.


I chew the soft stuff. I'm not a smoker, I just like the nootropic like benefit

#5 radical_tyro

  • Registered User
  • 7 posts
  • 0

Posted 18 March 2008 - 12:32 AM

I chew the soft stuff. I'm not a smoker, I just like the nootropic like benefit


What is the soft stuff called?

#6 hamishm00

  • Registered User
  • 945 posts
  • 75
  • Location:United Arab Emirates

Posted 18 March 2008 - 01:17 PM

[
I chew the soft stuff. I'm not a smoker, I just like the nootropic like benefit


I buy a generic brand from the biggest pharmacy chain in London: the chain is called "Boots", and their gum is called NicAssist.

#7 Alpha-Frequency

  • Registered User
  • 96 posts
  • -1

Posted 01 June 2008 - 10:57 PM

Are there actually people who chew Nicorette for purely cognitive enhancement reasons? I am not critisizing, I find this fascinating. I am going to look this up.

#8 hamishm00

  • Registered User
  • 945 posts
  • 75
  • Location:United Arab Emirates

Posted 04 June 2008 - 02:55 PM

I do, and am now!

#9 edward

  • Registered User
  • 1,404 posts
  • 19
  • Location:Southeast USA

Posted 05 June 2008 - 03:17 AM

Are there actually people who chew Nicorette for purely cognitive enhancement reasons? I am not critisizing, I find this fascinating. I am going to look this up.


I still daily wear 1/2 of a 21 mg nicotine patch. After not smoking for almost 2 years. I am convinced that nicotine in transdermal form is not a bad drug and has many positive effects on mood, energy, cognition etc.

#10 ikaros

  • Registered User
  • 321 posts
  • 3

Posted 06 June 2008 - 04:35 PM

Are there actually people who chew Nicorette for purely cognitive enhancement reasons? I am not critisizing, I find this fascinating. I am going to look this up.


Yes, I do. But it's not anymore enhancement, I just haven't got the time to deal with my nicotine addiction (ex-smoker). Nicotine loses it's enhancement pretty much in the first 2 weeks, after that it's just avoiding withdrawal effects. I'm thinking of using galantamine to speed up the recovery process.

#11 hamishm00

  • Registered User
  • 945 posts
  • 75
  • Location:United Arab Emirates

Posted 14 July 2008 - 11:47 AM

Article at uk.yahoo.com today:

Nicotine linked to 'memory boost'

Nicotine's addictive properties are closely tied to its ability to improve memory and learning, new research has shown.

The findings present an obstacle to using the tobacco chemical, or similar artificial drugs, to treat conditions such as Alzheimer's disease.

Previous research has shown that nicotine boosts memory and alertness, both of which are lost by Alzheimer's patients.

But nicotine is difficult to administer other than by smoking, and is highly addictive.

Although not as toxic as other tobacco chemicals, it may have some harmful side effects, especially during pregnancy.

Pharmaceutical companies are keen to develop safe nicotine-like substances for Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia.

The new research presented today at FENS 2008, the Forum of European Neuroscience meeting in Geneva, Switzerland, shows why this goal is so elusive.

Scientists led by Professor Ian Stolerman, from the Institute of Psychiatry at King's College London, studied the underlying mechanisms behind nicotine's effects on the brain.

They identified the role of nicotinic receptors - proteins that respond to nicotine - and several neuro-signalling chemicals in the brain, including dopamine, noradrenaline, glutamate and serotonin.

Dopamine is the "reward" chemical that triggers feelings of pleasure in response to certain stimuli such as food or sex, and is closely associated with addiction.

Prof Stolerman said: "We found several similarities and only small differences between the cognitive mechanisms and those involved in the addictive effects of nicotine.

"The cognitive 'boost' that many smokers experience from nicotine probably contributes to the reason people smoke cigarettes, so it may not be possible to totally prevent addiction. Nevertheless, the potential for abuse of a medicine based on a pure nicotine-like substance is likely to be very small."

The new findings may speed the discovery of agents that are better brain boosters than nicotine, with longer lasting effects, he said.

#12 pinballwizard

  • Registered User
  • 304 posts
  • 1

Posted 25 June 2009 - 05:36 AM

I spoke with the Mayo clinic's tobacco desk today. The head told me that they have not found any thing bad with nicotine. He did say nicotine was habit forming and nicotine helps create more nicotinic receptors in the brain thus creating a progressive addiction because the receptors rely on nicotine or they die off.

sponsored ad

  • Advert

#13 bacopa

  • Validating
  • 2,223 posts
  • 159
  • Location:Boston

Posted 25 June 2009 - 06:13 AM

wow I grind my teeth too! And as a result chewing the nicotine gum my teeth feel sensitive. But the nightguard, which I have, only protects from further damaging the teeth it won't better it.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users