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Low Dose Naltrexone for Longevity


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#1 hughbristic

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Posted 07 October 2007 - 02:24 PM


My mother has MS and has been taking low dose naltrexone (LDN) for several years to good effect. I recommended it to her after noticing it was rated the most effective treatment for MS (at the time) at revolutionhealth.com, a site that allows patients to rate various treatments on several indices based on their personal experience. All anecdotal evidence, I know, but there are some suggestive animal studies and theoretical reasons to think it may be effective. It is supposed to work by triggering a hormetic response, blocking opiod receptors briefly while you sleep, which increases their production during the day. Endogenous opiods are important regulators of immune function, and so LDN is thought to have benefit in a number of auto-immune disorders like MS. At the website lowdosenaltrexone.org, you can find the clinical experiences of Dr. Bernard Bihari in his treatment with LDN of patients with diseases ranging from cancer to AIDS to IBS, etc.

I began thinking that perhaps I should take it myself, though I do not have any such disease. In 50mg doses it is used as a prophylactic treatment to prevent relapse in opioid and alcohol addicts and has been tested for safety and is FDA approved for that indication. The dose used in off-label treatment of auto-immune disorders is 3-5mg. At that dose, my thinking was that it is very cheap and probably safe, and might prevent various illnesses as well as improve my mood and energy levels (a reported effect).

I looked online for any references to its use for such a purpose and was surprised to find a patent filed for this use by Dr. Alexander Michalow. Further investigation revealed that Dr. Michalow was giving a presentation at SENS3 on the topic. He didn't mention LDN by name, as there are several other compounds that could be used (such as naloxone), but his hypothesis seems to be that CR works by a hormetic mechanism and that one of the steps in that metabolic cycle could be induced by something like LDN, interfering in the pathway at a point before sirtuins would become activated. I watched the recently posted video of his presentation. He was rushed and didn't do a good job selling his idea, and an attendee practically heckled him.

Still, based on my mother's experience and what I've read, I'm seriously considering taking it. What do you think? Have you ever heard of this? Would you be willing to try it?

Best,
Hugh

#2 Futurist1000

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Posted 07 October 2007 - 02:31 PM

Naltrexone might make you lose weight because opioids are involved in the pleasure you get from eating. So indirectly this could lead to life extension if you weigh less.

improve my mood and energy levels (a reported effect).

I thought naltrexone would be more likely to lower your mood, but sometimes drugs can have paradoxical effects at different doses.

Edited by hrc579, 07 October 2007 - 04:36 PM.


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#3 FunkOdyssey

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Posted 07 October 2007 - 04:04 PM

Naltrexone does make you feel miserable -- that's why they take it at bedtime, so it hits you while you're sleeping. They're after the rebound effect that comes when the opioid receptors become more sensitive or more endogenous opioids are produced in response to naltrexone's antagonism.

#4 Futurist1000

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Posted 07 October 2007 - 04:34 PM

They're after the rebound effect that comes when the opioid receptors become more sensitive or more endogenous opioids are produced in response to naltrexone's antagonism.

Can you prevent tolerance to opioid drugs that way? It seems like you could take naltrexone at night and an opioid during the day. It would probably be hard to do, though, because of long drug half-lifes.

#5 krillin

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Posted 07 October 2007 - 05:20 PM

Be forewarned that endorphins make allergic reactions worse. For about three weeks (before my body figured out a countermeasure) I could get my allergies to completely go away with 16 mg/day taken at breakfast, so that I wouldn't make extra endorphins at night. It had interesting kinetics: it would start working a half hour after ingestion and would work for one hour per milligram ingested, tested over the range 1-25 mg.

Naltrexone doesn't help me anymore, but if I take a low dose at bedtime I'll have terrible allergies the next day.

Exp Dermatol. 2002 Oct;11(5):448-55.
Efficacy of naltrexone on acetylcholine-induced alloknesis in atopic eczema.
Heyer G, Groene D, Martus P.
Department of Dermatology, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Hartmannstrasse, Erlangen, Germany. gisela.heyer@derma.med.uni-erlangen.de

Atopic eczema (AE) is a chronically pruritic inflammatory skin disease. Although the mediators and exact mechanisms eliciting and sustaining pruritus are not completely known, AE patients in clinical trials have been shown to benefit under treatment with morphine antagonists. Naltrexone (NAL) is a relatively pure morphine antagonist that blocks the effects of opioids twice as much as naloxone. NAL exhibits minimal pharmacological activity and displaces endorphines at mu- and kappa-receptors without its own intrinsic activity. NAL's excellent oral bioavailability and linear increases in the area under plasma concentration-time curve make it ideal for use in experimental studies. We designed our present experiments similar to former experiments evaluating both peripheral cutaneous sensations and central itch procession in order to gain more information about the possible distribution of opioid receptors and their involvement in the pathophysiology of pruritus. Eleven AE patients participated in our double-blind study. Either 25 mg of NAL (Nemexin) or a placebo (PLA) was given to the participants 60 min prior to the acetylcholine (ACH) injection [intracutaneous (i.c.) injection of 0.02 ml of 0.55 M]. A PLA stimulus with buffered saline served as control on the opposite forearm. We used laser Doppler flowmetry to measure the vasomotoric changes after ACH injection and recorded the duration and intensity of itch with a visual analogue scale (VAS). Following the evaluation of wheal and flare sensation, we obtained the area of itchy skin around the injection site (alloknesis) by gently stroking the surrounding skin with a brush in the centripetal direction towards the injection site. The results were planimetrically evaluated. Oral NAL reduced the perifocal itch significantly (P < 0.009). In four of our observations the area of alloknesis completely disappeared. Itch duration was reduced by 20 s and the intensity of itch was diminished, yet not significantly. NAL had no significant effects on cholinergic vasoreactions measured by the laser Doppler (P > 0.50) and especially failed to decrease the initial flux response, which is a typical sign of an altered vascular reaction (P > 0.25). The decrease of wheal (P = 0.008) and flare (P = 0.01) extension indicates an appropriate dosage of our treatment for this experiment. The most significant effects of NAL were observed in parameters of itch processing such as alloknesis (P = 0.009) and flare extension (P = 0.01). Therefore we favour the concept that NAL might have a stronger impact on central nervous mechanisms than on peripheral nociceptive structures.

PMID: 12366698

#6 krillin

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Posted 07 October 2007 - 05:36 PM

Can you prevent tolerance to opioid drugs that way?  It seems like you could take naltrexone at night and an opioid during the day.  It would probably be hard to do, though, because of long drug half-lifes.


Yep. Naltrexone restores your sensitivity, so you have to be really careful not to OD the next time you do smack. Combining opioids with microgram quantities of naltrexone has interesting effects which I've never tried.

Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2002 Apr;36(2):224-8.
Naltrexone in the treatment of heroin dependence: relationship with depression and risk of overdose.
Ritter AJ.
Turning Point Alcohol and Drug Centre, Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia. Alisonr@turningpoint.org.au

OBJECTIVE: This article examines the use of naltrexone in the treatment of heroin dependence. The relationship between naltrexone and depression as well as risk of overdose is examined. METHOD: The existing literature is reviewed along with recent interim data from clinical trials underway in Victoria. RESULTS: Naltrexone is a recent addition to treatment for heroin dependence in Australia. The relationship between depression and naltrexone has been examined in previous literature. Underlying rates of depression in heroin users are high and treatment may resolve or exacerbate depression. Research to date demonstrates that the addition of naltrexone does not necessarily increase depression in patients. The risk of non-fatal heroin overdose is significantly elevated after naltrexone treatment as a result of reduced tolerance. Data from clinical trials underway in Victoria demonstrate a significantly elevated rate of non-fatal overdose in naltrexone patients compared to those in substitution maintenance treatment. The mortality rate subsequent to naltrexone treatment appears to be equivalent to or greater than that for untreated heroin users. Further research is required. CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians need to carefully monitor depression in patients, and warn patients of the risks of reduced tolerance to opiates following naltrexone treatment. Agonist treatments such as methadone, LAAM and buprenorphine carry much less risk of overdose.

PMID: 11982544

Brain Res. 1997 May 23;757(2):176-90.
Ultra-low doses of naltrexone or etorphine increase morphine's antinociceptive potency and attenuate tolerance/dependence in mice.
Shen KF, Crain SM.
Department of Neuroscience, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Yeshiva University, Bronx, NY 10461, USA.

In previous studies we showed that low (pM) concentrations of naloxone (NLX), naltrexone (NTX) or etorphine selectively antagonize excitatory, but not inhibitory, opioid receptor-mediated functions in nociceptive types of sensory neurons in culture. Cotreatment of these neurons with pM NTX or etorphine not only results in marked enhancement of the inhibitory potency of acutely applied nM morphine [or other bimodally-acting (inhibitory/excitatory) opioid agonists], but also prevents development of cellular manifestations of tolerance and dependence during chronic exposure to microM morphine. These in vitro studies were confirmed in vivo by demonstrating that acute cotreatment of mice with morphine plus a remarkably low dose of NTX (ca. 10 ng/kg) does, in fact, enhance the antinociceptive potency of morphine, as measured by hot-water tail-flick assays. Furthermore, chronic cotreatment of mice with morphine plus low doses of NTX markedly attenuates development of naloxone-precipitated withdrawal-jumping in physical dependence assays. The present study provides systematic dose-response analyses indicating that NTX elicited optimal enhancement of morphine's antinociceptive potency in mice when co-administered (i.p.) at about 100 ng/kg together with morphine (3 mg/kg). Doses of NTX as low as 1 ng/kg or as high as 1 microg/kg were still effective, but to a lesser degree. Oral administration of NTX in the drinking water of mice was equally effective as i.p. injections in enhancing the antinociceptive potency of acute morphine injections and even more effective in attenuating development of tolerance and NLX-precipitated withdrawal-jumping during chronic cotreatment. Cotreatment with a subanalgesic dose of etorphine (10 ng/kg) was equally effective as NTX in enhancing morphine's antinociceptive potency and attenuating withdrawal-jumping after chronic exposure. These studies provide a rationale for the clinical use of ultra-low-dose NTX or etorphine so as to increase the antinociceptive potency while attenuating the tolerance/dependence liability of morphine or other conventional bimodally-acting opioid analgesics.

PMID: 9200746

#7 FunkOdyssey

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Posted 03 December 2008 - 08:14 PM

More fuel for the fire:

Med Hypotheses. 2008 Nov 26. [Epub ahead of print]

Low-dose naltrexone for disease prevention and quality of life.
Brown N, Panksepp J.

Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, FL 32114, United States.

The use of low-dose naltrexone (LDN) for the treatment and prophylaxis of various bodily disorders is discussed. Accumulating evidence suggests that LDN can promote health supporting immune-modulation which may reduce various oncogenic and inflammatory autoimmune processes. Since LDN can upregulate endogenous opioid activity, it may also have a role in promoting stress resilience, exercise, social bonding, and emotional well-being, as well as amelioration of psychiatric problems such a autism and depression. It is proposed that LDN can be used effectively as a buffer for a large variety of bodily and mental ailments through its ability to beneficially modulate both the immune system and the brain neurochemistries that regulate positive affect.

PMID: 19041189


Where is the video mentioned here?

Further investigation revealed that Dr. Michalow was giving a presentation at SENS3 on the topic. I watched the recently posted video of his presentation.


nevermind, I found it: http://richardjschue...g2_itemId=57192

Edited by FunkOdyssey, 03 December 2008 - 08:17 PM.


#8 FunkOdyssey

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Posted 04 December 2008 - 04:22 PM

No interest? Lets dangle the carrot a little more prominently:

In sum, we conclude that low-dose naltrexone presents a safe and promising approach to prevention and/or treatment of many autoimmune diseases and cancer variants, as well as potentially various viral (e.g., AIDS) and neurological diseases (Multiple Sclerosis) that are exacerbated by compromised immunity. LDN’s potential for modulating both opioid and immune systems yields a very wide field for clinical experimentation as well as novel research directions for strengthening the scientific evidence for linkages between opioid and immune systems in the regulation of various disease processes. There are solid reasons to believe LDN can also promote positive emotional states through the endogenous opioid amplification of positive affect and energy [52]. From a psychiatric perspective, the facilitation of endogenous opioids should alleviate depression since, to some degree, that multifaceted problem reflects reduced ability to experience pleasure. Evidence also exists for resilience against cardiovascular stress [54,55] and for specific enhancement of the reward system for exercise [56], palatable tastes [57,58], laughter[59,60], sex [61], social bonding [4,62], and even the placebo effect of positive expectations [63].


Edited by FunkOdyssey, 04 December 2008 - 04:23 PM.


#9 Shepard

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Posted 04 December 2008 - 04:40 PM

Man, this stuff sounds good.

What's the consensus of the LDN community regarding dosing schedules (chronic vs. cycles)?

#10 FunkOdyssey

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Posted 04 December 2008 - 04:49 PM

The majority of LDN users are taking it daily, continuously, for indefinite periods of time. This is how it has been studied for treatment of Crohn's, MS, HIV, cancer, etc, so you would not expect much deviation from that. However, it is possible that an alternative dosing scheme (on-off cycles of various lengths) might have advantages in some respects. This question requires further experimentation and research.

Edited by FunkOdyssey, 04 December 2008 - 04:50 PM.


#11 edward

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Posted 04 December 2008 - 08:16 PM

I've thought about this for awhile and so far I am in favor of at least a trial. (god knows I've tried enough much more crazy costly stuff)

The only concerns I have are 1. influence on sleep quality 2. potential exacerbation of allergic response and/or too strong an immune reaction 3. The practicalites of splitting a 50 mg pill into 3-5 mg (ish) doses (on the upside this makes the treatment dirt cheap like $50 a year!) I guess a very good scale and some patience is in order.

I'd love to hear someone who has actually tried low dose naltrexone for prophylactic, life extension/enhancement purposes (someone who didn't already have a condition like MS, HIV or some infection whose symptoms were made temporarily worse by the low dose naltrexone)


BTW... that is a pretty Juicy Carrot :)

No interest? Lets dangle the carrot a little more prominently:

In sum, we conclude that low-dose naltrexone presents a safe and promising approach to prevention and/or treatment of many autoimmune diseases and cancer variants, as well as potentially various viral (e.g., AIDS) and neurological diseases (Multiple Sclerosis) that are exacerbated by compromised immunity. LDN’s potential for modulating both opioid and immune systems yields a very wide field for clinical experimentation as well as novel research directions for strengthening the scientific evidence for linkages between opioid and immune systems in the regulation of various disease processes. There are solid reasons to believe LDN can also promote positive emotional states through the endogenous opioid amplification of positive affect and energy [52]. From a psychiatric perspective, the facilitation of endogenous opioids should alleviate depression since, to some degree, that multifaceted problem reflects reduced ability to experience pleasure. Evidence also exists for resilience against cardiovascular stress [54,55] and for specific enhancement of the reward system for exercise [56], palatable tastes [57,58], laughter[59,60], sex [61], social bonding [4,62], and even the placebo effect of positive expectations [63].


Edited by edward, 04 December 2008 - 08:21 PM.


#12 FunkOdyssey

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Posted 04 December 2008 - 08:24 PM

With regard to the practical use of LDN, here's a copy of a PM I sent:

I am not currently using it because I have Lyme Disease and its immune-boosting properties were a little more than I could handle. However, I am planning to reintroduce it soon as I have been on antibiotic therapy for some time now and the overall bacterial load should be lower.

I have my fiancee on it to keep her healthy and help ensure she doesn't become infected (there are hints that it may be sexually transmitted, positive PCR tests on semen, anecdotally spouses of Lyme patients are far more likely to also have Lyme, etc). She enjoys the improved mood, energy, and ability to shrug off stress that it provides, and is in excellent health.

It increased my libido significantly and I am looking forward to taking it again. It really does boost the immune system powerfully though, and if you have a body riddled with infection (I didn't know I had Lyme at the time), it will be a bumpy ride. On the plus side, it provoked certain classical Lyme symptoms to begin which helped with my diagnosis. Its like my body didn't realize the infection was present, and LDN "turned on the lights", revealing the extent of it to my immune system.

I make it with a little glass jar, a graduated cylinder, and I bought 2000 disposable graduated pipettes. The typical thing to do is 50ml of water, drop in the 50mg tablet, dissolve, and 1ml = 1mg. Make sure to swish it around gently before dosing because some particles do not dissolve completely (it may not matter though as these are likely filler, naltrexone itself is water soluble). Olga is very squeamish about weird tasting things, and I would be lying if I said LDN didn't taste terrible. To enable us to put it in a capsule, I make a more concentrated version with 17ml of water per 50mg tablet, so 1ml = ~3mg. Then a 4.5mg dose will fit in two 00-size capsules. Please note they dissolve quickly when exposed to water -- the filled capsule has a life expectancy of about 1-2 minutes after filling.

I personally just squirt it in my mouth and take it like a man. :)


Sleep disruption usually occurs only for an initial period of time, some 3-5 days after an increase in dose. This can be minimized or avoided entirely depending on how slowly you are willing to ramp up the dose. I have not heard any reports of LDN exacerbating allergies (besides krillin's response).

Edited by FunkOdyssey, 04 December 2008 - 08:38 PM.


#13 Shepard

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Posted 04 December 2008 - 08:49 PM

I'm too curious, so I ordered some. I'm lazy though, and picked up some 10mg tablets and plan to just break them up. I'm kind of hoping the libido effect isn't too high, as I barely get anything done now.

#14 senseix

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Posted 04 December 2008 - 09:01 PM

I've been taking LDN off and on for months, and it does have a huge affect on Libido, i'm sure the g/f doesn't mind, but i was like woah i'm a horn dog LOL. The problem i had was i have always had sleeping issues, though some supplements have helped with that, and i've had it under control, when i started taking LDN it did mess that up, and no matter how long i took it, i just kept having sleeping issues, so like some it didn't stop after a week with making it hard to sleep. Still i could tell it was improving immune function and i think for some people this could really help them, it's cheap, and easy to get even with out a perscription. I have to thank FunkOdyssey for answering some of my questions about it before i tried, and even though i cycle with it, i still think it's a bonus more than a minus.

#15 FunkOdyssey

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Posted 04 December 2008 - 09:11 PM

I'm too curious, so I ordered some. I'm lazy though, and picked up some 10mg tablets and plan to just break them up. I'm kind of hoping the libido effect isn't too high, as I barely get anything done now.

Awesome, keep us posted with your experiences.

The problem i had was i have always had sleeping issues, though some supplements have helped with that, and i've had it under control, when i started taking LDN it did mess that up, and no matter how long i took it, i just kept having sleeping issues, so like some it didn't stop after a week with making it hard to sleep.

It has never been studied this way, but if you are willing to experiment, you might try taking it in the morning to see if that prevents sleep disruption. It might not be as effective, as the bulk of beta-endorphin production is supposed to take place during the early morning hours, but it may provide some degree of benefit compared with no LDN at all.

it does have a huge affect on Libido, i'm sure the g/f doesn't mind, but i was like woah i'm a horn dog LOL.

:)

Edited by FunkOdyssey, 04 December 2008 - 09:14 PM.


#16 senseix

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Posted 05 December 2008 - 01:10 AM

@FunkOdyssey, I did try doing it in the morning, and i felt like crap all day LOL. If i did it at night, but had my sleep interrupted, i felt pretty good during the day, doing it in the morning just made me feel like i was blah. I take other supplements though and that could be a cause, eventually i'd like to either get that figured out or i'll just stop using it, when i'm not on it, i feel good so who knows? I do like to drink a few glasses of wine per night or a few beers, maybe thats partly the reason?

Edited by senseix, 05 December 2008 - 01:11 AM.


#17 Shepard

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Posted 05 December 2008 - 02:40 AM

Were you taking melatonin/tryptophan/5-HTP/etc. along with the naltrexone when you had sleeping issues?

Were there any other effects other than the libido increase?

#18 FunkOdyssey

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Posted 05 December 2008 - 02:56 AM

The alcohol could definitely contribute to the mid-night awakenings. When you go to bed after consuming a significant amount of alcohol (3+ drinks), your sleep quality deteriorates, particularly in the later half of the night after the alcohol has worn off. There is some rebound stimulation that makes sleep more shallow and makes you more likely to awaken. You should try cutting out the alcohol for a few days and see how your sleep improves.

#19 yoyo

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Posted 05 December 2008 - 09:19 AM

Effects of beta-endorphin and morphine on the sleep-wakefulness behavior of cats.
King C, Masserano JM, Codd E, Byrne WL.

The effects of beta-endorphin and of morphine SO4 (0.5 microgram and 2.0 microgram, respectively, injected intraventricularly) upon the sleep-wakefulness behavior of cats were examined. Both agents produced insomnia. Deep slow wave sleep was sharply inhibited, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep was entirely suppressed. Light slow wave sleep, occurring in brief, isolated episodes, became the most abundant stage of sleep. The nuchal electromyogram was markedly increased after both agents. Naloxone (100 microgram/kg), injected subcutaneously 30 min before beta-endorphin or morphine SO4, entirely reversed these agents' effects on the two stages of slow wave sleep, and antagonized the exaggerated electromyogram. But naloxone did not counteract the REM-suppressant effect of either beta-endorphin or morphine SO4. Total sleep time reverted towards control values after naloxone pretreatment, but not entirely; the difference may be due to the persistent deficit of REM sleep. The data may indicate an involvement of an inner opioid in the regulation of sleep and wakefulness in the cat, and may point to a role for more than one endorphin receptor in the effects of opioids on the states of vigilance in cats.

The effect of opioids on sleep architecture..
Fonte: J Clin Sleep Med;3(1):33-6, 2007 Feb 15.
Resumo: STUDY OBJECTIVES: The effect of opioid medications on sleep architecture has been demonstrated in patients with comorbid pain or opioid addiction. This study examined whether commonly used opioid medications have an adverse effect on sleep architecture in healthy adults. METHODS: Forty-two healthy subjects were examined with polysomnography after a bedtime dose of placebo, sustained-release morphine sulfate (15 mg), or methadone (5 mg) on each of 3 different nights in a double-blind multiple crossover study in a sleep laboratory in the General Clinical Research Center at an academic medical center. RESULTS: Both opioid drugs significantly reduced deep sleep and increased stage 2 sleep (both p < .01); neither had an effect on sleep efficiency, wake after sleep onset, or total sleep time. CONCLUSIONS: Single doses of oral opioid medications can significantly affect sleep architecture in healthy adults, and observed reductions in slow-wave sleep following opioid administration may have important implications for the pathogenesis of opioid-use related fatigue..

#20 senseix

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Posted 05 December 2008 - 10:15 AM

Were you taking melatonin/tryptophan/5-HTP/etc. along with the naltrexone when you had sleeping issues?

Were there any other effects other than the libido increase?

I have tried Melatonin and 5-htp in the past, and neither helped me sleep, though Melatonin did for a few weeks. What does helpe me sleep is a good dose of Diamond V so thats what i use mainly and so far works well. I was taking that along with the LDN. Now if i take the LDN in the evening, and didn't sleep well, i did have good energy if i was able to get a decent nights sleep, so i could feel an energy surge and i could feel that my mood was more positive which i enjoyed. If i took it in the am, i just didn't feel none of that.

The alcohol could definitely contribute to the mid-night awakenings. When you go to bed after consuming a significant amount of alcohol (3+ drinks), your sleep quality deteriorates, particularly in the later half of the night after the alcohol has worn off. There is some rebound stimulation that makes sleep more shallow and makes you more likely to awaken. You should try cutting out the alcohol for a few days and see how your sleep improves.


The first month or so, i didn't drink at all, but i have found for me, that a few glasses of wine for instance can help me sleep in terms of falling to sleep and having a deeper sleep, so i went back to having a few drinks in the evening, and that didn't help with the LDN so i ended up going to the morning routine like you suggested and then eventually stopped.

What i liked about LDN when taken at night is, i could feel a surge of energy during the day that was nice, and my sex drive was insane so i wonder if someone has a low drive if this could help with that? My drive i would say is average without LDN.

#21 FunkOdyssey

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Posted 05 December 2008 - 03:01 PM

The first month or so, i didn't drink at all, but i have found for me, that a few glasses of wine for instance can help me sleep in terms of falling to sleep and having a deeper sleep, so i went back to having a few drinks in the evening, and that didn't help with the LDN so i ended up going to the morning routine like you suggested and then eventually stopped.

What i liked about LDN when taken at night is, i could feel a surge of energy during the day that was nice, and my sex drive was insane so i wonder if someone has a low drive if this could help with that? My drive i would say is average without LDN.


Alcohol helps you fall asleep, it just doesn't help you STAY asleep (through the whole night).

About the sex drive, the majority of current users of LDN are older women who are taking it for Multiple Sclerosis or Crohn's Disease, so there is not yet much awareness of its libido-boosting properties. On the LDN Yahoo Group there will be the occasional mention by a man that it kicked things into high gear for them. At some point I could imagine it being prescribed for that purpose. However, this might be a gender-specific response, because women (as far as I can tell) are not affected similarly or at least not to such an obvious degree.

Edited by FunkOdyssey, 05 December 2008 - 03:02 PM.


#22 inawe

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Posted 10 December 2008 - 12:34 AM

With regard to the practical use of LDN, here's a copy of a PM I sent:

I am not currently using it because I have Lyme Disease and its immune-boosting properties were a little more than I could handle. However, I am planning to reintroduce it soon as I have been on antibiotic therapy for some time now and the overall bacterial load should be lower.

I have my fiancee on it to keep her healthy and help ensure she doesn't become infected (there are hints that it may be sexually transmitted, positive PCR tests on semen, anecdotally spouses of Lyme patients are far more likely to also have Lyme, etc). She enjoys the improved mood, energy, and ability to shrug off stress that it provides, and is in excellent health.

It increased my libido significantly and I am looking forward to taking it again. It really does boost the immune system powerfully though, and if you have a body riddled with infection (I didn't know I had Lyme at the time), it will be a bumpy ride. On the plus side, it provoked certain classical Lyme symptoms to begin which helped with my diagnosis. Its like my body didn't realize the infection was present, and LDN "turned on the lights", revealing the extent of it to my immune system.

I make it with a little glass jar, a graduated cylinder, and I bought 2000 disposable graduated pipettes. The typical thing to do is 50ml of water, drop in the 50mg tablet, dissolve, and 1ml = 1mg. Make sure to swish it around gently before dosing because some particles do not dissolve completely (it may not matter though as these are likely filler, naltrexone itself is water soluble). Olga is very squeamish about weird tasting things, and I would be lying if I said LDN didn't taste terrible. To enable us to put it in a capsule, I make a more concentrated version with 17ml of water per 50mg tablet, so 1ml = ~3mg. Then a 4.5mg dose will fit in two 00-size capsules. Please note they dissolve quickly when exposed to water -- the filled capsule has a life expectancy of about 1-2 minutes after filling.

I personally just squirt it in my mouth and take it like a man. :)


Sleep disruption usually occurs only for an initial period of time, some 3-5 days after an increase in dose. This can be minimized or avoided entirely depending on how slowly you are willing to ramp up the dose. I have not heard any reports of LDN exacerbating allergies (besides krillin's response).

I'll like to try LDN to see if it helps my stomach (don't need any more libido). I couldn't find where to buy 1 or a couple of graduated
pipettes and graduated cylinder.I'll appreciate any pointers.

#23 FunkOdyssey

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Posted 10 December 2008 - 05:00 AM

I bought mine on ebay. Search "graduated cylinder" and "disposable pipettes" on ebay, there are many to choose from.

#24 edward

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Posted 18 December 2008 - 04:12 PM

One concern I have come up with while researching low dose naltrexone. Hormone levels including prolactin.

If one increases circulating endorphins (or gives someone an opiate for that matter) prolactin levels increase or the ability of dopamine to keep prolactin levels under control is blunted (depending on which study you read).

So except for the few hours the low dose naltrexone is actually antagonizing endogenous opiods, ones endorphin levels will be elevated beyond the normal range and thus prolactin will probably increase.

LH will probably increase as well leading to an increase in other hormones, test, estrogen etc.

The whole picture could be bad for a Male in the long run. Short run probably a net increase in libido as people taking it have seen but long term could be yucky.

#25 FunkOdyssey

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Posted 18 December 2008 - 04:33 PM

Well if you search through the LDN Yahoo messages, all you ever find with males talking about LDN and libido is up, up, up. I can follow your train of thought but I think there is a gap between theory and what is happening "on the ground" in this case. Acutely beta-endorphin may have an effect on these hormones but the responses are probably subject to the same tolerance and homeostatic adjustments we see elsewhere when the level of a given neurotransmitter / signaling input is persistently changed.

Edited by FunkOdyssey, 18 December 2008 - 04:34 PM.


#26 yoyo

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Posted 18 December 2008 - 08:08 PM

One concern I have come up with while researching low dose naltrexone. Hormone levels including prolactin.

If one increases circulating endorphins (or gives someone an opiate for that matter) prolactin levels increase or the ability of dopamine to keep prolactin levels under control is blunted (depending on which study you read).

So except for the few hours the low dose naltrexone is actually antagonizing endogenous opiods, ones endorphin levels will be elevated beyond the normal range and thus prolactin will probably increase.

LH will probably increase as well leading to an increase in other hormones, test, estrogen etc.

The whole picture could be bad for a Male in the long run. Short run probably a net increase in libido as people taking it have seen but long term could be yucky.


Increased sex hormone levels are likely to be a good thing for males who are aging.

#27 FunkOdyssey

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Posted 18 December 2008 - 09:01 PM

I've never seen any mention of an effect on sex hormones reported -- then again, its probably rare for anyone to run before / after hormonal panels. I invite one brave soul to step up and do it for science. My money is on no effect or an insignificantly small effect.

#28 yoyo

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Posted 18 December 2008 - 11:12 PM

I've never seen any mention of an effect on sex hormones reported -- then again, its probably rare for anyone to run before / after hormonal panels. I invite one brave soul to step up and do it for science. My money is on no effect or an insignificantly small effect.



Really? Opioid receptors are one of the two main feedback systems regulating androgens...

#29 edward

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Posted 19 December 2008 - 12:25 AM

Well I ordered some so we will see how things go. I am probably not going to do a before and after hormone panel. I could get a before done as its nearing the time for my yearly physical but I'm pushing my luck (insurance and my doctors indulgence to test some "supplement" as that is what I would have to call it).

I am pretty sensitive to my hormones being even a little out of whack, too much of an SSRI without a dopaminergic agent will do it. So will Testosterone Replacement therapy without an aromatase inhibitor or a SERM to block estrogens effects. Ill know if something is up

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#30 Shepard

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Posted 19 December 2008 - 12:50 AM

Over at M&M, a guy ran naltrexone and something else to boost test. I'm fairly sure he posted before/after blood results, but his dosage was around 25mg/day and he couldn't stand the side effects.




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