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Bochumer Matrizen-Test


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4 replies to this topic

#1 Lurker

  • Location:California

Posted 29 April 2008 - 02:13 PM


Read an article about this on wired. It talks about a type of IQ test being experimented with (Bochumer Matrizen-Test) that has been showen to improve scores in other kinds of general problem solving tests. The innovation in this isn't exactly in the software, but in the tests themselves.

Wired Article

Anybody have any examples of these kinds of tests?

#2 dr_chaos Re: Bochumer Matrizen-Test

  • Location:Vienna

Posted 29 April 2008 - 08:01 PM

no. but i think i'll order their software. for 45€ is a bit pricey but at least they have some studies to prove their clames.

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#3 digfarenough Re: Bochumer Matrizen-Test

  • Location:Boston

Posted 09 May 2008 - 09:31 PM

Read an article about this on wired. It talks about a type of IQ test being experimented with (Bochumer Matrizen-Test) that has been showen to improve scores in other kinds of general problem solving tests. The innovation in this isn't exactly in the software, but in the tests themselves.

Wired Article

Anybody have any examples of these kinds of tests?


You misunderstood the article. It worked like this: subjects took the BM Test to get a baseline score. Subjects were trained in the dual n-back task. Subjects re-took the BM Test and got a higher score.

The innovation was not in the BM test nor was it in the n-back task, but rather in showing that practicing the latter helped out the former.

As for the dual n-back task, it is demonstrated right in the figure in the article you linked. In this version, subjects viewed a sequence of visual stimuli (targets at different locations), each of which was simultaneously presented along with an auditory stimulus (a spoken consonant). If, when the ith pair of stimuli was presented, either the current consonant spoken or the current target location was identical to that from the (i-n)th pair, then the subject is supposed to respond by pressing a button. That is the task that subjects performed. It would be pretty easy to write a computer program to do this task.

N-back tasks, by the way, are pretty fun.

#4 nanostuff Re: Bochumer Matrizen-Test

Posted 01 June 2008 - 04:33 PM

I just responded to this in the Brain-Computer forum, but it's worth repeating myself here.

A good replica of the test,

http://cognitivefun.net/test/8

Or if you prefer German phonetic,

http://cognitivefun.net/test/5

I agree that this looks pretty important and significant. I've started two days ago and gone from being completely lost on the 2-back to doing fairly well on the 3-back in total play time of no more than 40 minutes. By the end of the month I'll try to make some assessment as to how this translates to my everyday function. Subjective and anecdotal, but if the results are as significant as claimed, I should notice an improvement in my routine.

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#5 digfarenough Re: Bochumer Matrizen-Test

  • Location:Boston

Posted 06 June 2008 - 09:42 PM

I just responded to this in the Brain-Computer forum, but it's worth repeating myself here.

A good replica of the test,

http://cognitivefun.net/test/8

Or if you prefer German phonetic,

http://cognitivefun.net/test/5

I agree that this looks pretty important and significant. I've started two days ago and gone from being completely lost on the 2-back to doing fairly well on the 3-back in total play time of no more than 40 minutes. By the end of the month I'll try to make some assessment as to how this translates to my everyday function. Subjective and anecdotal, but if the results are as significant as claimed, I should notice an improvement in my routine.


that's handy.. I have written my own multi-platform version of it based on the actual study (same basic stimuli, essentially the same rule the task uses to make it harder or easier depending on your ability, etc.).. just wrote it for fun as a way to learn Qt

I do think an important aspect of their study was the way the difficulty of the task was constantly being adjusted.. also, the task gets really hard: 4-back will make you suffer! :p

actually, quick look at that page suggests they too based that on the paper originally mentioned, so that's good

more interesting is the question of how long the effect will last.. a colleague of mine and I chatted about the study briefly and she wasn't particularly convinced it would be useful for increasing intelligence, whereas I'm not so sure.. she, however, actually does this sort of testing on healthy and diseased humans, whereas I only do this sort of testing on software, so she may have better intuition :p




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