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Resveratrol successfully fights cancer in two dogs


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#1 missminni

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 10:24 PM


I've posted about my nine year old American Bulldog Minni's success fighting cancer with Resveratrol in a few different threads on Imminst. I also posted about the success my friend had with Resveratrol shrinking a malignant tumor on her 11 year old Golden Retriever.
I wanted to start a thread about it so as not to be off topic on other threads and to let everyone know about our success story.
Minni's biopsy report and progress to date are posted on Resveratrol for Dogs and the pinned forum Resveratrol Flunks Vs. Real-World Cancer.

Her biopsy was taken on Jan 8th 2008. She was given 6 months at the most to live.
We are 5 months into it and she is showing no signs of cancer and is healthier than ever as I have happily reported on the other threads.

I also wanted to point out that her surgical scar, which was over 8" long and very ugly, keloid-like and bulging at the time of her surgery,
which was on Jan 8th, can hardly be found. The vet at Bobst was truly amazed at how incredibly well she healed.
That examination was on May 1. At that time, the vet also said that if the cancer was advancing, we would see some signs of
deterioration. There were none. In fact, on the contrary she looked better than ever.

I just took a look at the scar and I honestly couldn't find it. I had to really look close to see a slight hair of a line where the incision was
and if I didn't know there once was an incision there, I would never have found it. I can hardly believe it. Her scar was so gross and bulging, even the vet who performed the surgery apologized saying he had to remove so much more than he planned that he couldn't help the horrible scar. Her 4th and 5th mammary glands and adjacent lymph gland were removed.
Might the Resveratrol be responsible for this amazing healing or do dogs just heal like that?
I wish I'd taken before pictures. It's quite amazing.


#2 malbecman

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 11:57 PM

Well, regardless of what the resveratrol skeptics may think or say, I'm just glad your dog is doing so much better, missminni. I just read the biopsy report and while it has been a few years since my histopath coursework, I am amazed any animal could be doing so well after such a diagnosis. That was pretty grim reading.

Cheers and enjoy the outcome!! :p



I've posted about my nine year old American Bulldog Minni's success fighting cancer with Resveratrol in a few different threads on Imminst. I also posted about the success my friend had with Resveratrol shrinking a malignant tumor on her 11 year old Golden Retriever.
I wanted to start a thread about it so as not to be off topic on other threads and to let everyone know about our success story.
Minni's biopsy report and progress to date are posted on Resveratrol for Dogs and the pinned forum Resveratrol Flunks Vs. Real-World Cancer.

Her biopsy was taken on Jan 8th 2008. She was given 6 months at the most to live.
We are 5 months into it and she is showing no signs of cancer and is healthier than ever as I have happily reported on the other threads.

I also wanted to point out that her surgical scar, which was over 8" long and very ugly, keloid-like and bulging at the time of her surgery,
which was on Jan 8th, can hardly be found. The vet at Bobst was truly amazed at how incredibly well she healed.
That examination was on May 1. At that time, the vet also said that if the cancer was advancing, we would see some signs of
deterioration. There were none. In fact, on the contrary she looked better than ever.

I just took a look at the scar and I honestly couldn't find it. I had to really look close to see a slight hair of a line where the incision was
and if I didn't know there once was an incision there, I would never have found it. I can hardly believe it. Her scar was so gross and bulging, even the vet who performed the surgery apologized saying he had to remove so much more than he planned that he couldn't help the horrible scar. Her 4th and 5th mammary glands and adjacent lymph gland were removed.
Might the Resveratrol be responsible for this amazing healing or do dogs just heal like that?
I wish I'd taken before pictures. It's quite amazing.



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#3 Shepard

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 02:43 AM

What dose were you using?

#4 missminni

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 02:58 AM

What dose were you using?

I was giving her 7 grams a day for the first two months, and gradually lowered it to 6, 5 and now between 4 and 5 a day.
She's 94 lbs. I am using no other supplements except glucosamine sulfate.
My friend is giving her 60 lb dog about 3 grams a day and her tumor is shrinking.


#5 ortcloud

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 02:24 AM

What dose were you using?

I was giving her 7 grams a day for the first two months, and gradually lowered it to 6, 5 and now between 4 and 5 a day.
She's 94 lbs. I am using no other supplements except glucosamine sulfate.
My friend is giving her 60 lb dog about 3 grams a day and her tumor is shrinking.


Wow ! Congrats on your success.

So was it 7 grams of 100% trans resveratrol or 7 grams of a 50% etc. extract ?

Did it make any difference in her behavior ? energy, mood ? ?

I am glad to hear that this worked so well.
I know there has been some talk about whether giving your dog resveratrol is safe
or not as there is a warning about giving dogs grape products. If it is knotweed, it
is def not grapes at all, but since I dont think we know enough what is in grapes that
causes the problem.

#6 missminni

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 11:09 AM

Wow ! Congrats on your success.

So was it 7 grams of 100% trans resveratrol or 7 grams of a 50% etc. extract ?

Did it make any difference in her behavior ? energy, mood ? ?

I am glad to hear that this worked so well.
I know there has been some talk about whether giving your dog resveratrol is safe
or not as there is a warning about giving dogs grape products. If it is knotweed, it
is def not grapes at all, but since I dont think we know enough what is in grapes that
causes the problem.

It was 7 grams of 98% Resveratrol Powder.
It made a tremendous difference in the way she looked, felt and consequently, behaved. She felt great, looked
amazing with improved musculature, stronger hind legs, brighter eyes, softer coat etc. She continues to maintain
these improvements, even at lower doses. I give it to my male dog too. He doesn't have cancer but he had a nasty
triple ear infection that we tried to fight with antibiotics for 4 years to no avail. The res got rid of it.


#7 TianZi

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 09:43 AM

Wow ! Congrats on your success.

So was it 7 grams of 100% trans resveratrol or 7 grams of a 50% etc. extract ?

Did it make any difference in her behavior ? energy, mood ? ?

I am glad to hear that this worked so well.
I know there has been some talk about whether giving your dog resveratrol is safe
or not as there is a warning about giving dogs grape products. If it is knotweed, it
is def not grapes at all, but since I dont think we know enough what is in grapes that
causes the problem.

It was 7 grams of 98% Resveratrol Powder.
It made a tremendous difference in the way she looked, felt and consequently, behaved. She felt great, looked
amazing with improved musculature, stronger hind legs, brighter eyes, softer coat etc. She continues to maintain
these improvements, even at lower doses. I give it to my male dog too. He doesn't have cancer but he had a nasty
triple ear infection that we tried to fight with antibiotics for 4 years to no avail. The res got rid of it.


That's a massive dose! Did you give it all at once daily, or spread it out?

I guess the equivalent for the typical 150 lb human would be almost 11 grams / 11,000 mg daily, without taking into account differences in human and dog metabolism. I'm not sure if there are any human studies currently underway using that high a dose. Are there?

Anyone here know anything concrete about how dog and human metabolisms differ? Might be difficult to say since dogs seem to differ more from one another than mice do, for example.

#8 missminni

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 11:55 AM

Wow ! Congrats on your success.

So was it 7 grams of 100% trans resveratrol or 7 grams of a 50% etc. extract ?

Did it make any difference in her behavior ? energy, mood ? ?

I am glad to hear that this worked so well.
I know there has been some talk about whether giving your dog resveratrol is safe
or not as there is a warning about giving dogs grape products. If it is knotweed, it
is def not grapes at all, but since I dont think we know enough what is in grapes that
causes the problem.

It was 7 grams of 98% Resveratrol Powder.
It made a tremendous difference in the way she looked, felt and consequently, behaved. She felt great, looked
amazing with improved musculature, stronger hind legs, brighter eyes, softer coat etc. She continues to maintain
these improvements, even at lower doses. I give it to my male dog too. He doesn't have cancer but he had a nasty
triple ear infection that we tried to fight with antibiotics for 4 years to no avail. The res got rid of it.


That's a massive dose! Did you give it all at once daily, or spread it out?

I guess the equivalent for the typical 150 lb human would be almost 11 grams / 11,000 mg daily, without taking into account differences in human and dog metabolism. I'm not sure if there are any human studies currently underway using that high a dose. Are there?

Anyone here know anything concrete about how dog and human metabolisms differ? Might be difficult to say since dogs seem to differ more from one another than mice do, for example.

I gave it to her in one daily dose. From what I understand, dogs metabolize res more efficiently than humans but this is something I was told, not something I read. My reason for giving it to her in one massive dose was to aggressively attack the cancer cells and flood them out.
I read about an antibiotic for dogs that when given in that manner, i.e. one huge daily dose (8g), was more effective so I tried that method.
She's still doing great.

#9 krillin

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 11:15 PM

Human - animal dose conversion

#10 niner

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Posted 27 June 2008 - 04:06 AM

Human - animal dose conversion

The title of this document is "Estimating the Safe Starting Dose in Clinical Trials for Therapeutics in Adult Healthy Volunteers". The algorithm they present is designed to avoid toxicities in the first use of a drug in humans. As such, it may underestimate the pharmacologically effective dose in humans.

#11 missminni

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Posted 03 July 2008 - 07:38 PM

As it approaches the 6 month mark (July 8th) of Minni's 6 months to live prognosis, Minni, who will be 10 years old in Jan, is doing
great, eating well and ready to play ball at the wink of an eye. God bless resveratrol.

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#12 maxwatt

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Posted 03 July 2008 - 07:44 PM

As it approaches the 6 month mark (July 8th) of Minni's 6 months to live prognosis, Minni, who will be 10 years old in Jan, is doing
great, eating well and ready to play ball at the wink of an eye. God bless resveratrol.


Yea! Minni!

#13 missminni

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 01:32 AM

As it approaches the 6 month mark (July 8th) of Minni's 6 months to live prognosis, Minni, who will be 10 years old in Jan, is doing
great, eating well and ready to play ball at the wink of an eye. God bless resveratrol.


Yea! Minni!


Minni sends you a big kiss and lots of wagging tail.


#14 DukeNukem

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 02:29 AM

Super congrats. What did the vet/doctor say? Did you tell your vet during treatment about the RESV? Will the vet start recommending RESV for other dogs now, do you think?

#15 niner

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 02:59 AM

Minni sends you a big kiss and lots of wagging tail.

Well, that certainly caught my eye! Oh, wait, Minni is the dog... Well, whatever, congratulations missminni, and congratulations to li'l Ms. Minni, too. I wish you both much more wagging tail. She looks great!

#16 missminni

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 09:07 AM

Super congrats. What did the vet/doctor say? Did you tell your vet during treatment about the RESV? Will the vet start recommending RESV for other dogs now, do you think?

Thanks
The vet at Animal Medical Center saw her last in May and couldn't believe her eyes. She first saw her in Jan., two weeks after her
operation/biopsy report when she drained her seroma.
She took copious notes and said she was
going to speak with the other doctors at the hospital about using it in clinical trials although the normal procedure for that would be
financed by a drug company, but I don't know what happened.
I emailed her last week
to tell her how great Minni was doing but have not heard back. My original vet, the one who operated and told me she would
die in 6 months, does not know because I stopped seeing him after he botched up draining her seroma twice and acted
like I was wasting my time trying to save her. He did that with another dog I had who had cardio myopathy. He's big on
putting dogs down fast. He never heard of Resverarol and wasn't interested in knowing about it.


#17 thefirstimmortal

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 09:43 AM

How much should humans use to combat cancer?

#18 missminni

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 11:00 AM

How much should humans use to combat cancer?

I don't know. As I understand it dogs are able to access it better than humans,
so maybe humans would need a higher dose. I really don't know. Just guessing.


#19 missminni

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 11:07 AM

Minni sends you a big kiss and lots of wagging tail.

Well, that certainly caught my eye! Oh, wait, Minni is the dog... Well, whatever, congratulations missminni, and congratulations to li'l Ms. Minni, too. I wish you both much more wagging tail. She looks great!

Hi Niner,
Yeah, Minni is a dog...and her real name is Miss Minni. In fact her pedigree name is Big Bull's Real Deal Miss Minni.
I use her puppy picture for my avatar. She's the love of my life and thanks for noticing how good she looks. I think she looks amazing considering her age and her biopsy report. The Res definitely
improved her appearance. She was looking pretty bad after her operation. I wish I could take it in higher doses too, but that estrogen issue
is daunting.


#20 TianZi

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Posted 07 July 2008 - 08:38 AM

Super congrats. What did the vet/doctor say? Did you tell your vet during treatment about the RESV? Will the vet start recommending RESV for other dogs now, do you think?

Thanks
The vet at Animal Medical Center saw her last in May and couldn't believe her eyes. She first saw her in Jan., two weeks after her
operation/biopsy report when she drained her seroma.
She took copious notes and said she was
going to speak with the other doctors at the hospital about using it in clinical trials although the normal procedure for that would be
financed by a drug company, but I don't know what happened.
I emailed her last week
to tell her how great Minni was doing but have not heard back. My original vet, the one who operated and told me she would
die in 6 months, does not know because I stopped seeing him after he botched up draining her seroma twice and acted
like I was wasting my time trying to save her. He did that with another dog I had who had cardio myopathy. He's big on
putting dogs down fast. He never heard of Resverarol and wasn't interested in knowing about it.


"He never heard of Resverarol and wasn't interested in knowing about it."

Sounds like part of the problem was that this vet viewed pets as non-sentient objects and himself as simply a mechanic. But let me chime in as regards physicians knowing nothing about resveratrol, and not caring to know anything about it.

My 63 year old father suffers from Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, has only one kidney that is failing, has had several major heart attacks, and is obese (among other health problems--he also suffers from sirrhosis of the liver, etc.). He is the perfect candidate for resveratrol. However, although he sees 4 different physicians regularly for his host of ailments, only *ONE* of them (the general practitioner) had even heard of resveratrol. Notably, the "expert" cardiologist had no idea what it was, and was not interested in my father's questions about it.

Fortunately, my father has started taking resveratrol this week after pressure from me for over a year. I sent him links to study after study, and articles in prominent newspapers discussing those studies, but he remained uninterested until he watched the recent Barbara Walters' special that discussed the health benefits resveratrol. In his case, a (moving) picture was worth much more than (many thousands of) words.


#21 missminni

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Posted 07 July 2008 - 08:59 AM

"He never heard of Resverarol and wasn't interested in knowing about it."

Sounds like part of the problem was that this vet viewed pets as non-sentient objects and himself as simply a mechanic. But let me chime in as regards physicians knowing nothing about resveratrol, and not caring to know anything about it.

My 63 year old father suffers from Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, has only one kidney that is failing, has had several major heart attacks, and is obese (among other health problems--he also suffers from sirrhosis of the liver, etc.). He is the perfect candidate for resveratrol. However, although he sees 4 different physicians regularly for his host of ailments, only *ONE* of them (the general practitioner) had even heard of resveratrol. Notably, the "expert" cardiologist had no idea what it was, and was not interested in my father's questions about it.

Fortunately, my father has started taking resveratrol this week after pressure from me for over a year. I sent him links to study after study, and articles in prominent newspapers discussing those studies, but he remained uninterested until he watched the recent Barbara Walters' special that discussed the health benefits resveratrol. In his case, a (moving) picture was worth much more than (many thousands of) words.

I'm glad to hear your dad is taking it now. Funny that it took Barbara Walters to convince him.
Doctors are not interested in resveratrol because they are in the business of selling pharmaceuticals, not curing illnesses with supplements.
As Chris Rock said about AIDS, "the money's in the medicine, not the cure".

#22 inawe

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Posted 07 July 2008 - 03:42 PM

As far as I know, and I'll be happy to be corrected, the only known positive effects of RSV on serious illness in large mammals, are the reports on Minni and the other dog. No other such in vivo effects can be found in the literature. That's why no oncologist will recommend RSV instead of chemotherapy.

#23 missminni

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Posted 07 July 2008 - 06:08 PM

As far as I know, and I'll be happy to be corrected, the only known positive effects of RSV on serious illness in large mammals, are the reports on Minni and the other dog. No other such in vivo effects can be found in the literature. That's why no oncologist will recommend RSV instead of chemotherapy.

I believe there were trials done with dogs, but I can't find them now. However,
they didn't even recommend chemo for my dog. They said it wouldn't help, she was too far gone and
they never heard of resveratrol. I gave one of the vets at Bopst some papers on it to read, and she was amazed. She didn't know a thing about it
before but at least she was interested in reading about it. Unlike the vet who operated on Minni and didn't have any interest in even hearing about it. When I mentioned it to him he basically said who cares, your dog is going to die anyway so just face reality and accept it.
He thought I was in denial.
Doctors know what drug companies tell them, since they support the
medical schools and hospitals that educate them. Chemo is a money making industry for drug companies, doctors and hospitals alike.
Resveratrol is not. It might be one of these days, when Sirtis finishes their trials, but right now it is just another easily dismissed
supplement. I'm not surprised that Sirtis is concentrating on the diabetes aspect of it...since chemo is such a major
industry that I am sure there was some politics going on around that.

Edited by missminni, 07 July 2008 - 06:12 PM.


#24 free

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Posted 07 July 2008 - 09:24 PM

Unlike the vet who operated on Minni and didn't have any interest in even hearing about it. When I mentioned it to him he basically said who cares, your dog is going to die anyway so just face reality and accept it.
He thought I was in denial.



Unreal. I know some vets are very hands off, but the ones that truly believe this won't have their hand out, either.
One thing I noticed here where I live, the vets have a tendency towards this attitude (well, they are going to die) but at least they won't put their hands in my wallet to take advantage, either. Kind of an eastern/Buddhist touch (Hawaii).

This is such great news about your dogs. I'm researching into giving resveratrol my dogs (one is handicapped) and my horse (has uveitis/glaucoma).

Good luck and please keep us posted on your dogs' progress - it is very inspirational.

Edited by free, 07 July 2008 - 09:24 PM.


#25 missminni

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Posted 08 July 2008 - 12:07 AM

Unlike the vet who operated on Minni and didn't have any interest in even hearing about it. When I mentioned it to him he basically said who cares, your dog is going to die anyway so just face reality and accept it.
He thought I was in denial.



Unreal. I know some vets are very hands off, but the ones that truly believe this won't have their hand out, either.
One thing I noticed here where I live, the vets have a tendency towards this attitude (well, they are going to die) but at least they won't put their hands in my wallet to take advantage, either. Kind of an eastern/Buddhist touch (Hawaii).

This is such great news about your dogs. I'm researching into giving resveratrol my dogs (one is handicapped) and my horse (has uveitis/glaucoma).

Good luck and please keep us posted on your dogs' progress - it is very inspirational.

Thanks. I am sure resveratrol will help your animals. A friend of mine whose ChowChow was limping for
almost two years started him on Resveratrol and he limps no more. The response was immediate. She saw an improvement the first day
and by the end of the week, the difference was dramatic. It would probably help your horse's glaucoma too according to the study below.


Antioxidant experiment

The final phase of the experiment evaluated the benefits of antioxidant treatment. Having designed a model to show how IOP elevation can induce oxidative stress and cell death, Dr. Liu and his colleagues wanted to see if they could reverse that process.The RGC-5 cell cultures were pretreated with the antioxidants resveratrol and quercetin (20 µm or 40 µm in dimethyl sulfoxide) for 30 minutes before undergoing 2 hours of elevated pressure (60 mm Hg). Results showed that pretreatment with resveratrol reduced the level of HNE adducts in the cell cultures by 70%, whereas quercetin pretreatment resulted in a 30% reduction in oxidative stress.Resveratrol is a compound found largely in the skin of red grapes and has been studied as a possible explanation for the "French paradox," the relatively low incidence of heart disease among the French, despite their high-fat diet. In addition, resveratrol is a compound that can mimic the effect of caloric restriction, which is the only proven method to elongate the life span of mammals. Quercetin is a flavonoid with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.Although elevated pressure is a major risk factor for glaucoma, so, too, is aging. Since resveratrol appears to have some anti-aging properties in addition to other protective mechanisms, it might be beneficial in multiple ways, including reduction of oxidative stress levels, Dr. Liu said.Following that preliminary screening process, which showed that resveratrol was more effective than quercetin for reducing oxidative stress levels in cell cultures, Dr. Liu and his colleagues are following up by conducting further experiments in a mouse model of glaucoma. The mice are receiving these compounds in their food; scientists will subsequently study them to determine the presence of any protective effects on the RGC cells.Dr. Liu and his colleagues are conducting other studies to determine the potential role of oxidative stress in the chronic pattern of glaucoma pathology by studying different chronic animal models of glaucoma and even some patient samples. They are exploring the possibility of preventive methods or therapies developed from antioxidants or similar compounds for glaucoma patients.Findings from the three experiments appeared in the October issue of Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science (2007;48:4580-4589).


Edited by missminni, 08 July 2008 - 12:14 AM.


#26 robyn

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Posted 10 July 2008 - 11:43 PM

Unlike the vet who operated on Minni and didn't have any interest in even hearing about it. When I mentioned it to him he basically said who cares, your dog is going to die anyway so just face reality and accept it.
He thought I was in denial.



Unreal. I know some vets are very hands off, but the ones that truly believe this won't have their hand out, either.
One thing I noticed here where I live, the vets have a tendency towards this attitude (well, they are going to die) but at least they won't put their hands in my wallet to take advantage, either. Kind of an eastern/Buddhist touch (Hawaii).

This is such great news about your dogs. I'm researching into giving resveratrol my dogs (one is handicapped) and my horse (has uveitis/glaucoma).

Good luck and please keep us posted on your dogs' progress - it is very inspirational.

Thanks. I am sure resveratrol will help your animals. A friend of mine whose ChowChow was limping for
almost two years started him on Resveratrol and he limps no more. The response was immediate. She saw an improvement the first day
and by the end of the week, the difference was dramatic. It would probably help your horse's glaucoma too according to the study below.


Antioxidant experiment

The final phase of the experiment evaluated the benefits of antioxidant treatment. Having designed a model to show how IOP elevation can induce oxidative stress and cell death, Dr. Liu and his colleagues wanted to see if they could reverse that process.The RGC-5 cell cultures were pretreated with the antioxidants resveratrol and quercetin (20 µm or 40 µm in dimethyl sulfoxide) for 30 minutes before undergoing 2 hours of elevated pressure (60 mm Hg). Results showed that pretreatment with resveratrol reduced the level of HNE adducts in the cell cultures by 70%, whereas quercetin pretreatment resulted in a 30% reduction in oxidative stress.Resveratrol is a compound found largely in the skin of red grapes and has been studied as a possible explanation for the "French paradox," the relatively low incidence of heart disease among the French, despite their high-fat diet. In addition, resveratrol is a compound that can mimic the effect of caloric restriction, which is the only proven method to elongate the life span of mammals. Quercetin is a flavonoid with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.Although elevated pressure is a major risk factor for glaucoma, so, too, is aging. Since resveratrol appears to have some anti-aging properties in addition to other protective mechanisms, it might be beneficial in multiple ways, including reduction of oxidative stress levels, Dr. Liu said.Following that preliminary screening process, which showed that resveratrol was more effective than quercetin for reducing oxidative stress levels in cell cultures, Dr. Liu and his colleagues are following up by conducting further experiments in a mouse model of glaucoma. The mice are receiving these compounds in their food; scientists will subsequently study them to determine the presence of any protective effects on the RGC cells.Dr. Liu and his colleagues are conducting other studies to determine the potential role of oxidative stress in the chronic pattern of glaucoma pathology by studying different chronic animal models of glaucoma and even some patient samples. They are exploring the possibility of preventive methods or therapies developed from antioxidants or similar compounds for glaucoma patients.Findings from the three experiments appeared in the October issue of Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science (2007;48:4580-4589).


This is such great news! I'm delighted to see someone else using the resveratrol for their pets. I have a border collie who has been growing tumors that itch constantly. After months of remedies that the vet recommended; were expensive and did nothing; I decided, "what the heck? try the pup on resveratrol. Vet says he's on his way out anyway." So I wrapped up a capsule in a piece of lunchmeat and he gobbled it up and voila! stopped biting and scratching himself. What a relief to see him actually resting and not whining!!!!!! I think he has had a few seizures and a stroke that makes his back legs run sideways. After the capsules, he is a happy camper and enjoying his frisbee runs.

#27 robyn

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Posted 10 July 2008 - 11:48 PM

I gave my border collie a capsule (400mg. resveratrol) to see if it would stop the incessant itching, biting and scratching. After enduring a year of watching him suffer, it was such a relief to see him at rest in about 30 minutes. Nothing else worked that the vet recommended. So when he starts to scratch the numerous tumors on his belly, I give him a capsule, and soon he is contented and enjoying some well deserved rest. since resveratrol studies show that it destroys tumor cells, I figured what the heck? He's getting old and everyone looks at him and declares that he is not long for this world, but I decided to give it a try anyway. Glad your puppies have done so well on it.

#28 missminni

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Posted 11 July 2008 - 12:19 AM

I gave my border collie a capsule (400mg. resveratrol) to see if it would stop the incessant itching, biting and scratching. After enduring a year of watching him suffer, it was such a relief to see him at rest in about 30 minutes. Nothing else worked that the vet recommended. So when he starts to scratch the numerous tumors on his belly, I give him a capsule, and soon he is contented and enjoying some well deserved rest. since resveratrol studies show that it destroys tumor cells, I figured what the heck? He's getting old and everyone looks at him and declares that he is not long for this world, but I decided to give it a try anyway. Glad your puppies have done so well on it.

Thanks. Glad to hear your dog is having success with it as well. Why don't you try giving him a higher dose and see how much more he will improve. It's more affordable now then ever, if you buy the pure powder. My friends dog's tumors are shrinking and they were biopsied and malignant and deadly. Her dog is a golden retriever of about 60 lbs, and she gives her 3 g a day. She's 10 yrs old and her vet is amazed.
Oh, BTW, just switched my dogs to a grain free dog food....Wellness CORE.
They love it and my male dogs hives seem to be clearing up since I started him on it. He has always had a slight case of hives under his
fur. They don't seem to itch, but you can see the raised bumps and they get little scabs on them...like dry skin. They are definitely diminished
since changing food.
Good luck with your collie. So glad he is finding some relief. Don't give up on him.


#29 stephen_b

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Posted 11 July 2008 - 03:59 PM

Oh, BTW, just switched my dogs to a grain free dog food....Wellness CORE.


I just did some research and started our puppy and oldster on grain free too (Orijen). Pricer than science diet, but I hope it will work out.

Stephen

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#30 missminni

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Posted 11 July 2008 - 06:24 PM

Oh, BTW, just switched my dogs to a grain free dog food....Wellness CORE.


I just did some research and started our puppy and oldster on grain free too (Orijen). Pricer than science diet, but I hope it will work out.

Stephen

I think Wellness Core might be less expensive. How much are you paying for
Orijen? BTW, Science Diet, although vets recommend it all the time, is not a good quality dog food.





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