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Resveratrol is suppressing Minni's immune system


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#1 missminni

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Posted 02 August 2008 - 06:30 PM


I just discovered that Minni has canine viral papilloma between her toes. This is very common
among puppies whose immune systems are not fully developed, very contagious among dogs, and usually clears up in one to five months without treatment. However since Minni is almost ten, it is unusual. When it occcurs in older dogs it usually indicates a challenged immune system.
Since Minni is taking Resveratrol, and it is an immune supressant I am concerned that it won't go away on its own and will spread.
I don't want to take her off of Resveratrol, and the canine viral papilloma is benign so it is not imminently threatening to her, but
I would like to get rid of them since she does pick at them and they might get infected. It's spread to three of the crevices in her toes
already. I've been trying to keep them clean with peroxide and alcohol. Should I lower her Resveratrol dose? I'd hate to take a chance
on the cancer coming back if I do. I have lowered it from what I was giving her at first. She's at 3g a day now.
Any and all suggestions are appreciated. Thanks


#2 Matt

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Posted 02 August 2008 - 06:57 PM

Would this be safe in dogs?

http://www.activamun...data_center.htm

Check it out, some very positive effects./

Click HERE to rent this advertising spot to support LongeCity (this will replace the google ad above).

#3 missminni

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Posted 02 August 2008 - 07:32 PM

Would this be safe in dogs?

http://www.activamun...data_center.htm

Check it out, some very positive effects./

Wow. that's very interesting. I think I'll take it, although I am taking so much stuff right now I can't imagine adding another thing. There was a link to the product that I will quote below. My dogs love broccoli but since it is such an intense form I'm not sure if it would be safe in dogs because I have read that too much broccoli can be toxic in dogs. I'll check into it further. Asking the vet is useless. They just say no to anything human grade.
Any other opinions on this? Thanks Matt...this just might help.

BREAKTHROUGH DISCOVERY IN NUTRITIONAL IMMUNOLOGY
At the University of California at Berkeley, the Chairman of the Nutritional Sciences Department and the Director of the National Institutes of Health Cancer Research Program were studying the anticancer properties of Diindolylmethane (DIM), a naturally occurring compound found in Brassica vegetables (broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, kale, brussels sprouts), when they made a remarkable discovery: DIM is a potent activator of the immune response system. Activation of the immune system in part explains DIM's anticancer properties, and for the first time, sheds light on its potent antiviral and antibacterial properties. The scientists patented their discovery and ActivaMune was launched as a first-in-class nutritional supplement to enhance the immune system and support multiple organs throughout the body: breast, prostate, cardiovascular, vision, skin and colon health. ActivaMune's unique and patented formula combines multiple nutrients for maximum effectiveness: Diindolylmethane (DIM), Sulforaphane, Selenium, Lycopene, Lutein, Zeaxanthin, Calcium and Vitamins C, D3 & E.
ActivaMune's formula is exclusively licensed from the University of California at Berkeley. The supplement provides phytonutrients equivalent to approximately five pounds of fresh organic uncooked broccoli, tomatoes and spinach per day. All broccoli extract supplements on the market today, without exception, do not have the active ingredients in ActivaMune as their manufacturing process (heat or freeze drying) destroys the enzyme necessary for the production of the key phytonutrients present in this supplement.
The Scientific Advisory Board members of our company are internationally renowned scientists in the fields of nutrition, oncology and immunology:
Dr. Leonard Bjeldanes, Ph.D. Professor and Former Chairman, Nutritional Sciences Department, UC Berkeley. Dr. Bjeldanes is the most cited scientist worldwide in the field of Diindolylmethane research.
Dr. Gary Firestone, Ph.D. Director, National Institutes of Health Cancer Research Program, UC Berkeley. Dr. Firestone and Dr. Bjeldanes at UC Berkeley have together published more scientific papers on DIM than any other scientific team worldwide.
Dr. Christopher Benz, M.D. Professor of Medicine in Oncology, UCSF, founder of the first laboratory at UCSF dedicated to breast cancer research, Program Director, Cancer and Developmental Therapeutics Program, Buck Institute for Age Research.
Dr. Warner Greene, M.D., Ph.D. Professor of Medicine in Immunology, UCSF, Director, UCSF Gladstone Institute of Virology and Immunology, Board Member, United States Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences.
Invest in your health today and thrive with ActivaMune. Proceeds from ActivaMune sales support research and development of nature-based therapeutics for cancer, AIDS and other diseases. Thank you for your support.



#4 stephen_b

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Posted 02 August 2008 - 08:18 PM

I've found cat's claw to be a good immune booster. It recently helped stop my bronchitis, which I've had before and recognized its early symptoms. I've taken this product, four capsules once and then two capsules in the morning for about a week.

Stephen

#5 missminni

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Posted 02 August 2008 - 09:50 PM

Matt
I checked into DIM and it is toxic for dogs in high doses:

3,3’-Diindolylmethane (DIM) is a major condensation product (metabolite) of indole-3-carbinol, a potential anticancer component of cruciferous Brassica vegetables such as cabbage and broccoli. Both compounds have shown experimental cancer preventive efficacy in breast, prostate and cervical cancer models. The purpose of this study was to assess the toxicity of DIM in Beagle dogs following 4 weeks of daily oral capsule treatment at target doses of 0, 25 (low dose), 120 (mid dose) and 450 mg/kg/day (high dose). No mortalities occurred, but a male and a female in the high dose group were moribund sacrificed on days 19 and 26, respectively. Unusual thinness was seen in 2 other males and 3 other females in this group. Clinical signs included vomit in run, decreased activity, dehydration and pale gums in the high dose group. Food consumption was decreased in the high dose group, but moderately so in the mid dose group females. Total body weight gain reduction was observed in the high dose group males (14.5%{downarrow}) and females (24.6%{downarrow}). Serum total bilirubin levels were elevated in high dose group males, and high and mid dose group females. Elevated serum ALT, AST and ALKP values in one high dose group female and histopathologic lesions also in the liver suggested hepatocellular injury and cholestasis. DIM-induced anemia, more pronounced in the high dose group females than males, was accompanied by a dose-dependent compensatory increase in percentage of reticulocytes. No treatment-related changes were seen in ophthalmologic, electrocardiographic and urinalysis parameters and organ weights except moderate thymic atrophy in the high dose group. The tmax for DIM occurred between 2 - 4.5 hr. The systemic exposure of DIM increased in a dose-dependent fashion. The mean AUC0-24 values for the low, mid and high dose groups were 835, 2382 and 4271 ng-hr/mL, respectively for males, and 981, 1202 and 8034 ng-hr/mL, respectively, for females. Females were more sensitive to the toxic effects of DIM. Overall, toxic responses to oral treatment of DIM in dogs included several signs of toxicity related to body weight gain reduction, reduced food consumption, hepatoxicity, anemia, thymic atrophy, hematopoietic hyperplasia in sternal bone marrow and mild kidney damage [histopathologic renal lesions and mild changes in serum electrolyte levels (hypocalcemia and hyperchloremia)] seen predominantly in the high dose group. Under the conditions of this study, based on the purity of DIM, the [b]No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) was 21 mg/kg/day. (Supported by NCI Contract no. N01-CN-95132).



however the amount of Diindolylmethane is 375 mg for 2 capsules. At Minni's weight times 21 mg/kg/day has her being safe according to this study up to 897 mg. Sooo I think I might try it. If my figures are wrong, please somebody correct me.


#6 missminni

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Posted 02 August 2008 - 09:52 PM

I've found cat's claw to be a good immune booster. It recently helped stop my bronchitis, which I've had before and recognized its early symptoms. I've taken this product, four capsules once and then two capsules in the morning for about a week.

Stephen


is it anti-viral? That's my main concern since it is viral papilloma.

#7 sUper GeNius

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Posted 02 August 2008 - 10:07 PM

I've found cat's claw to be a good immune booster. It recently helped stop my bronchitis, which I've had before and recognized its early symptoms. I've taken this product, four capsules once and then two capsules in the morning for about a week.

Stephen


is it anti-viral? That's my main concern since it is viral papilloma.


How do you know that's it's the t-res? Is Minni on an other meds? Chemo? Also, maybe the t-res is simply boosting the virus,as opposed to suppressing her immune system. Is this theoretically possible?

Edited by FuLL meMbeR, 02 August 2008 - 10:09 PM.


#8 stephen_b

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Posted 02 August 2008 - 10:17 PM

Supposedly:

The antiviral and immunomodulating in vitro effects from U. tomentosa pentacyclic oxindole alkaloids displayed novel properties regarding therapeutic procedures in Dengue Fever and might be further investigated as a promising candidate for clinical application.

Review of antiviral and immunomodulating properties of plants of the Peruvian rainforest with a particular emphasis on Una de Gato and Sangre de Grado.

I think you'd have to look at the full articles to find out more. It might be a better antibacterial agent than antiviral.

This pdf lists some of its antiviral uses.

Stephen

#9 missminni

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Posted 02 August 2008 - 10:17 PM

I've found cat's claw to be a good immune booster. It recently helped stop my bronchitis, which I've had before and recognized its early symptoms. I've taken this product, four capsules once and then two capsules in the morning for about a week.

Stephen


is it anti-viral? That's my main concern since it is viral papilloma.


How do you know that's it's the t-res? Is Minni on an other meds? Chemo? Also, maybe the t-res is simply boosting the virus,as opposed to suppressing her immune system. Is this theoretically possible?

Because resveratrol suppresses the immune system. It just does. No Minni's not on Chemo or anything else.

#10 missminni

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Posted 02 August 2008 - 10:24 PM

Supposedly:

The antiviral and immunomodulating in vitro effects from U. tomentosa pentacyclic oxindole alkaloids displayed novel properties regarding therapeutic procedures in Dengue Fever and might be further investigated as a promising candidate for clinical application.

Review of antiviral and immunomodulating properties of plants of the Peruvian rainforest with a particular emphasis on Una de Gato and Sangre de Grado.

I think you'd have to look at the full articles to find out more. It might be a better antibacterial agent than antiviral.

This pdf lists some of its antiviral uses.

Stephen

Thanks. It probably does but also thats probably dose dependent. The DIM product might be worth a try. I just can't stand their sales pitch.

#11 Lufega

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Posted 03 August 2008 - 01:33 AM

The drug Sulindac was found to kill the HPV virus. The same goes for vit A&D in a dose of 25,000 IU and 1000 IU respectively.

#12 missminni

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Posted 03 August 2008 - 01:59 AM

The drug Sulindac was found to kill the HPV virus. The same goes for vit A&D in a dose of 25,000 IU and 1000 IU respectively.

Wow. Vit A and D. Any specific source of A and D? Once a day for how long? Great to know.
Could you give a little more info about it. Thanks


#13 sUper GeNius

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Posted 03 August 2008 - 02:44 AM

I've found cat's claw to be a good immune booster. It recently helped stop my bronchitis, which I've had before and recognized its early symptoms. I've taken this product, four capsules once and then two capsules in the morning for about a week.

Stephen


is it anti-viral? That's my main concern since it is viral papilloma.


How do you know that's it's the t-res? Is Minni on an other meds? Chemo? Also, maybe the t-res is simply boosting the virus,as opposed to suppressing her immune system. Is this theoretically possible?

Because resveratrol suppresses the immune system. It just does. No Minni's not on Chemo or anything else.


After doing some more reading, it seems that resveratrol (and curcumin) does indeed *modulate* the immune system, usually for the better. That may be why my MS symptoms have subsided. Think auto-immune diseases. I think you may be overreacting to these warts. If it is due to to resveratrol, the positive effects of the immune system modulation are likely to outweigh any negative effects.

Edited by FuLL meMbeR, 03 August 2008 - 02:45 AM.


#14 smithx

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Posted 03 August 2008 - 03:28 AM

Before people go out and get DIM, take a look at its hormonal effects.

For example:
http://www.t-nation....;cr=supplements


The picture is confused, but it definitely affects estrogen metabolism.

#15 missminni

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Posted 03 August 2008 - 03:55 AM

I've found cat's claw to be a good immune booster. It recently helped stop my bronchitis, which I've had before and recognized its early symptoms. I've taken this product, four capsules once and then two capsules in the morning for about a week.

Stephen


is it anti-viral? That's my main concern since it is viral papilloma.


How do you know that's it's the t-res? Is Minni on an other meds? Chemo? Also, maybe the t-res is simply boosting the virus,as opposed to suppressing her immune system. Is this theoretically possible?

Because resveratrol suppresses the immune system. It just does. No Minni's not on Chemo or anything else.


After doing some more reading, it seems that resveratrol (and curcumin) does indeed *modulate* the immune system, usually for the better. That may be why my MS symptoms have subsided. Think auto-immune diseases. I think you may be overreacting to these warts. If it is due to to resveratrol, the positive effects of the immune system modulation are likely to outweigh any negative effects.

Oh they definitely do. I'm not blaming res. It's just that the suppression of her immune system made her susceptible to the virus but its a totallly harmless virus and I'm sure we'll figure something out to get rid of it.
btw, That's great about your MS!

Edited by missminni, 03 August 2008 - 04:00 AM.


#16 maxwatt

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Posted 03 August 2008 - 03:59 AM

I just discovered that Minni has canine viral papilloma between her toes. This is very common
among puppies whose immune systems are not fully developed, very contagious among dogs, and usually clears up in one to five months without treatment. However since Minni is almost ten, it is unusual. When it occcurs in older dogs it usually indicates a challenged immune system.
Since Minni is taking Resveratrol, and it is an immune supressant I am concerned that it won't go away on its own and will spread.
I don't want to take her off of Resveratrol, and the canine viral papilloma is benign so it is not imminently threatening to her, but
I would like to get rid of them since she does pick at them and they might get infected. It's spread to three of the crevices in her toes
already. I've been trying to keep them clean with peroxide and alcohol. Should I lower her Resveratrol dose? I'd hate to take a chance
on the cancer coming back if I do. I have lowered it from what I was giving her at first. She's at 3g a day now.
Any and all suggestions are appreciated. Thanks


This doesn't seem quite right, especially as resveratrol kills many viruses and is effective against papilloma in mice. See below.

One way resveratrol is effective against tumors is to prevent angiogenesis, in effect killing them by starvaton, preventing them from establishing a blood supply to allow them to grow. It is also possible that this reduces the blood flow to the toes enough that the natural immune response does not destroy the papilloma, allowing it to grow.

You might consider reducing Minni's resveratrol intake by 50%; given that she is in remission from cancer, this should be a sufficient maintenance dose. At the same time, apply resveratrol in a cream base to her toes. Something edible, she will lick them, but enough will be applied to be absorbed by the papilloma. I think resveratrol applied this way will kill them, as it does in mice and to viruses in test tubes. It should be worth trying.

Ai Zheng. 2004 Aug;23(8):869-73. Links
[Chemopreventive effect of resveratrol to cancer][Article in Chinese]


Fu ZD, Cao Y, Wang KF, Xu SF, Han R.
Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100050, PR China.

BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE: Carcinogenesis is a complex process and at least 3 stages, including initiation, promotion, and progression, have been proposed in the process of carcinogenesis. Resveratrol has attracted considerable attention due to its low toxicity and unique chemical structure. This study was designed to test chemopreventive effect of resveratrol to cancer using various animal models. METHODS:Ames assay and micronucleus formation assay were used to test the antimutagenic activities of resveratrol. Croton oil-induced enhancement of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activities of dorsal epidermis cells in mouse and mouse ear edema model were used to investigate the anti-promotion effect of resveratrol. In addition,7,12-dimenthylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)/croton oil-induced mouse skin tumor model was used to evaluate chemopreventive effect of resveratrol to cancer in vivo. RESULTS: In Ames test,100 microg/plate of resveratrol exhibited 42.2% of inhibition on the reversion of Salmonella typhimurium TA100 induced by methylmethansulfonate, and 200 microg/plate of resveratrol exhibited 91.8% of inhibition on the reversion induced by benzopyrene.Pretreatment of resveratrol prevented cyclophosphamide (CTX)-induced micronucleus formation of polychromatic erythrocytes of mice bone marrow in dose-dependent manner. Mice treated with 30 mg/kg of resveratrol for 6 days before croton oil exposure have palliative ear edema. Treatment of 180 mg/kg resveratrol for 3 days caused 69.3% decrease of ODC activities in croton oil-induced dorsal epidermis. It was shown that resveratrol could inhibit DMBA/croton oil-induced mouse skin papilloma, which includes prolonging the latent period of tumor occurrence, decreasing the incidence of papilloma, and reducing tumor number per mouse in dose-dependent manner. CONCLUSION: Resveratrol has the ability of anti-mutation and anti-promotion of cancer and merit further studies as a potential cancer chemopreventive agent.



#17 missminni

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Posted 03 August 2008 - 04:12 AM

This doesn't seem quite right, especially as resveratrol kills many viruses and is effective against papilloma in mice. See below.

One way resveratrol is effective against tumors is to prevent angiogenesis, in effect killing them by starvaton, preventing them from establishing a blood supply to allow them to grow. It is also possible that this reduces the blood flow to the toes enough that the natural immune response does not destroy the papilloma, allowing it to grow.
Oh that's brilliant. Of course.
You might consider reducing Minni's resveratrol intake by 50%; given that she is in remission from cancer, this should be a sufficient maintenance dose. At the same time, apply resveratrol in a cream base to her toes. Something edible, she will lick them, but enough will be applied to be absorbed by the papilloma. I think resveratrol applied this way will kill them, as it does in mice and to viruses in test tubes. It should be worth trying.
Will do. What would be best for mixing it with...yogurt or flaxseed oil? What would penetrate faster? what about dmso? Thanks for giving this your attention. I think you just saved me a whole lot of trouble.

Ai Zheng. 2004 Aug;23(8):869-73. Links
[Chemopreventive effect of resveratrol to cancer][Article in Chinese]


Fu ZD, Cao Y, Wang KF, Xu SF, Han R.
Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100050, PR China.

BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE: Carcinogenesis is a complex process and at least 3 stages, including initiation, promotion, and progression, have been proposed in the process of carcinogenesis. Resveratrol has attracted considerable attention due to its low toxicity and unique chemical structure. This study was designed to test chemopreventive effect of resveratrol to cancer using various animal models. METHODS:Ames assay and micronucleus formation assay were used to test the antimutagenic activities of resveratrol. Croton oil-induced enhancement of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activities of dorsal epidermis cells in mouse and mouse ear edema model were used to investigate the anti-promotion effect of resveratrol. In addition,7,12-dimenthylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)/croton oil-induced mouse skin tumor model was used to evaluate chemopreventive effect of resveratrol to cancer in vivo. RESULTS: In Ames test,100 microg/plate of resveratrol exhibited 42.2% of inhibition on the reversion of Salmonella typhimurium TA100 induced by methylmethansulfonate, and 200 microg/plate of resveratrol exhibited 91.8% of inhibition on the reversion induced by benzopyrene.Pretreatment of resveratrol prevented cyclophosphamide (CTX)-induced micronucleus formation of polychromatic erythrocytes of mice bone marrow in dose-dependent manner. Mice treated with 30 mg/kg of resveratrol for 6 days before croton oil exposure have palliative ear edema. Treatment of 180 mg/kg resveratrol for 3 days caused 69.3% decrease of ODC activities in croton oil-induced dorsal epidermis. It was shown that resveratrol could inhibit DMBA/croton oil-induced mouse skin papilloma, which includes prolonging the latent period of tumor occurrence, decreasing the incidence of papilloma, and reducing tumor number per mouse in dose-dependent manner. CONCLUSION: Resveratrol has the ability of anti-mutation and anti-promotion of cancer and merit further studies as a potential cancer chemopreventive agent.



#18 sUper GeNius

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Posted 03 August 2008 - 04:15 AM

I've found cat's claw to be a good immune booster. It recently helped stop my bronchitis, which I've had before and recognized its early symptoms. I've taken this product, four capsules once and then two capsules in the morning for about a week.

Stephen


is it anti-viral? That's my main concern since it is viral papilloma.


How do you know that's it's the t-res? Is Minni on an other meds? Chemo? Also, maybe the t-res is simply boosting the virus,as opposed to suppressing her immune system. Is this theoretically possible?

Because resveratrol suppresses the immune system. It just does. No Minni's not on Chemo or anything else.


After doing some more reading, it seems that resveratrol (and curcumin) does indeed *modulate* the immune system, usually for the better. That may be why my MS symptoms have subsided. Think auto-immune diseases. I think you may be overreacting to these warts. If it is due to to resveratrol, the positive effects of the immune system modulation are likely to outweigh any negative effects.

Oh they definitely do. I'm not blaming res. It's just that the suppression of her immune system made her susceptible to the virus but its a totallly harmless virus and I'm sure we'll figure something out to get rid of it.
btw, That's great about your MS!


Well, I've never gotten the official MS diagnosis, but that's not exactly a diagnosis one goes shopping for. I'll wait until I've purchased all the insurance I need. I've lost my hearing twice in my left ear in a very narrow frequency range. Returned in a few weeks. I used to get dizzy, eye rolling, pulsing sensations through my arms and sometimes my legs, lips. One day, on a whim, I had been having these symptoms and I had read about curcumin helping rats with MS. I took about 3 grams with piperine, and the next day my symptoms were greatly ameliorated. They came back slightly the following day. I figured I had not used a high enough dosage, so I took 6 grams, for three or fours days. Instant relief. Don't know whether it's MS, but it certainly seems to be inflammation related, and the curcumin clearly works.

#19 missminni

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Posted 03 August 2008 - 04:24 AM

I've found cat's claw to be a good immune booster. It recently helped stop my bronchitis, which I've had before and recognized its early symptoms. I've taken this product, four capsules once and then two capsules in the morning for about a week.

Stephen


is it anti-viral? That's my main concern since it is viral papilloma.


How do you know that's it's the t-res? Is Minni on an other meds? Chemo? Also, maybe the t-res is simply boosting the virus,as opposed to suppressing her immune system. Is this theoretically possible?

Because resveratrol suppresses the immune system. It just does. No Minni's not on Chemo or anything else.


After doing some more reading, it seems that resveratrol (and curcumin) does indeed *modulate* the immune system, usually for the better. That may be why my MS symptoms have subsided. Think auto-immune diseases. I think you may be overreacting to these warts. If it is due to to resveratrol, the positive effects of the immune system modulation are likely to outweigh any negative effects.

Oh they definitely do. I'm not blaming res. It's just that the suppression of her immune system made her susceptible to the virus but its a totallly harmless virus and I'm sure we'll figure something out to get rid of it.
btw, That's great about your MS!


Well, I've never gotten the official MS diagnosis, but that's not exactly a diagnosis one goes shopping for. I'll wait until I've purchased all the insurance I need. I've lost my hearing twice in my left ear in a very narrow frequency range. Returned in a few weeks. I used to get dizzy, eye rolling, pulsing sensations through my arms and sometimes my legs, lips. One day, on a whim, I had been having these symptoms and I had read about curcumin helping rats with MS. I took about 3 grams with piperine, and the next day my symptoms were greatly ameliorated. They came back slightly the following day. I figured I had not used a high enough dosage, so I took 6 grams, for three or fours days. Instant relief. Don't know whether it's MS, but it certainly seems to be inflammation related, and the curcumin clearly works.

That's excellent. And resveratrol keeps it under control, or do you still do curcumin?

#20 TianZi

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Posted 03 August 2008 - 07:09 AM

I noted 180 mg / kg of resveratrol was the amount found in the study to have the most significant anti-cancer effects. That would be a dose of about 12.5 grams in a 150 lb. subject, before adjusting for differences in metabolism between mice and humans. It's in line with the amount MissMinni successfully used to treat her dog.

I also note that the recent high profile low dosage resveratrol study found no cancer preventive effects at a dosage equivalent to 700 mg for a 150 lb human, and that they further found no activation of SIRT at that dosage, whereas stimulation of this enzyme at higher dosages is well-documented. This leads me to speculate that the anti-cancer potential of resveratrol is linked to its ability above a minimum threshhold dosage level to stimulate SIRT.

Edited by TianZi, 03 August 2008 - 07:13 AM.


#21 missminni

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Posted 03 August 2008 - 12:44 PM

This doesn't seem quite right, especially as resveratrol kills many viruses and is effective against papilloma in mice. See below.

One way resveratrol is effective against tumors is to prevent angiogenesis, in effect killing them by starvaton, preventing them from establishing a blood supply to allow them to grow. It is also possible that this reduces the blood flow to the toes enough that the natural immune response does not destroy the papilloma, allowing it to grow.

You might consider reducing Minni's resveratrol intake by 50%; given that she is in remission from cancer, this should be a sufficient maintenance dose. At the same time, apply resveratrol in a cream base to her toes. Something edible, she will lick them, but enough will be applied to be absorbed by the papilloma. I think resveratrol applied this way will kill them, as it does in mice and to viruses in test tubes. It should be worth trying.

You are once again RIGHT! Last night I put about a g of resveratrol mixed in flaxseed oil between Minni's toes
and this morning they were at least if not more than 50% improved. The warts are smaller and in one case almost gone already.
I'll keep you posted, but at this rate she should be cleared in a few days. AMAZING!


#22 missminni

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Posted 03 August 2008 - 12:49 PM

I noted 180 mg / kg of resveratrol was the amount found in the study to have the most significant anti-cancer effects. That would be a dose of about 12.5 grams in a 150 lb. subject, before adjusting for differences in metabolism between mice and humans. It's in line with the amount MissMinni successfully used to treat her dog.

I also note that the recent high profile low dosage resveratrol study found no cancer preventive effects at a dosage equivalent to 700 mg for a 150 lb human, and that they further found no activation of SIRT at that dosage, whereas stimulation of this enzyme at higher dosages is well-documented. This leads me to speculate that the anti-cancer potential of resveratrol is linked to its ability above a minimum threshhold dosage level to stimulate SIRT.


It's all about the dose! I remember reading about an antibiotic for dogs where they gave an 8g mega dose all in one dose
and found it effective in curing a ear infection that it didn't clear in smaller divided doses. That big wallop of a dose was like a KO, That's why I did Minni's that way.

Edited by missminni, 03 August 2008 - 12:49 PM.


#23 missminni

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Posted 09 August 2008 - 09:19 PM

Minni's viral papilloma warts are almost all gone. The two that she picked
at that were red and raw are totally healed with only the skin where they once were showing because the hair has to grow back.
There were two other warts starting but she hadn't picked at them yet. They are both entirely gone.
Then there is one that was much bigger than the ones that were starting, but hadn't been picked at, and that one
is about 10% of it's original size. Like it probably was when it first started. I've been putting resveratrol
in a little flaxseed oil in between her toes every night. Resveratrol cures everything from cancer to warts.
It's just phenomenal.


#24 stephen_b

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Posted 10 August 2008 - 04:51 AM

I wonder if resveratrol might help those with herpes breakouts. If anyone has that, be sure to report back if they tried it. :)

Stephen

#25 hmm

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Posted 10 August 2008 - 05:23 AM

I wonder if resveratrol might help those with herpes breakouts. If anyone has that, be sure to report back if they tried it. :)

Stephen

The studies I read on RSV vs HSV showed that treatment had to begin early enough and be applied often enough (like every 4 hours or so), and if so, RSV was as at least as effective as topical acyclovir. I think this is where a RSV patch would come in really handy. Folks make fun of it because it can't really get enough into your blood stream to replace high-level dosages, but what if you simply need to get a smaller amount into a localized area for an extended period of time? There might be a real market for an RSV patch. For a while there was a company advertising patches, http://redwinepatch.com/ , but they didn't respond to email and their web site looks a bit stale...

#26 missminni

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Posted 10 August 2008 - 06:04 AM

I wonder if resveratrol might help those with herpes breakouts. If anyone has that, be sure to report back if they tried it. :)

Stephen

The studies I read on RSV vs HSV showed that treatment had to begin early enough and be applied often enough (like every 4 hours or so), and if so, RSV was as at least as effective as topical acyclovir. I think this is where a RSV patch would come in really handy. Folks make fun of it because it can't really get enough into your blood stream to replace high-level dosages, but what if you simply need to get a smaller amount into a localized area for an extended period of time? There might be a real market for an RSV patch. For a while there was a company advertising patches, http://redwinepatch.com/ , but they didn't respond to email and their web site looks a bit stale...

Topical application for localized breakouts of these viral warts seems to be very effective. She had them for at least two weeks when i started topical appication on Aug. 2. It is a week later and the condition is about 95% cleared. It not only got rid of the warts, it healed the ones she had picked at that looked raw and infected.

#27 hmm

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Posted 10 August 2008 - 05:23 PM

I wonder if resveratrol might help those with herpes breakouts. If anyone has that, be sure to report back if they tried it. :)

Stephen

I tried RSV mixed with DMSO and it did seem to slow the HSV down a bit, though not much. But I got started late, and applying something to your body 6-8 times a day for days on end doesn't work all that well...hence the possible usefulness of a patch.

#28 missminni

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Posted 10 August 2008 - 06:35 PM

I wonder if resveratrol might help those with herpes breakouts. If anyone has that, be sure to report back if they tried it. :)

Stephen

I tried RSV mixed with DMSO and it did seem to slow the HSV down a bit, though not much. But I got started late, and applying something to your body 6-8 times a day for days on end doesn't work all that well...hence the possible usefulness of a patch.

6 to 8 times a day? why? You only have to apply it once or twice. I put it on minni once a day, usually before she goes to sleep at night. Maybe you have to use more resvertrol in the mix...and oil that will stay on long enough for the Resveratrol to be absorbed. What did you use?

#29 krillin

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Posted 10 August 2008 - 10:10 PM

I wonder if resveratrol might help those with herpes breakouts. If anyone has that, be sure to report back if they tried it. :)

Stephen

I tried RSV mixed with DMSO and it did seem to slow the HSV down a bit, though not much. But I got started late, and applying something to your body 6-8 times a day for days on end doesn't work all that well...hence the possible usefulness of a patch.

Maxwatt developed a recipe for a homebrew patch.

http://www.imminst.o...&...st&p=250107

Click HERE to rent this advertising spot to support LongeCity (this will replace the google ad above).

#30 hmm

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Posted 11 August 2008 - 02:51 AM

I wonder if resveratrol might help those with herpes breakouts. If anyone has that, be sure to report back if they tried it. ;)

Stephen

I tried RSV mixed with DMSO and it did seem to slow the HSV down a bit, though not much. But I got started late, and applying something to your body 6-8 times a day for days on end doesn't work all that well...hence the possible usefulness of a patch.

6 to 8 times a day? why? You only have to apply it once or twice. I put it on minni once a day, usually before she goes to sleep at night. Maybe you have to use more resvertrol in the mix...and oil that will stay on long enough for the Resveratrol to be absorbed. What did you use?

I actually had about 30% RSV in the mix, more than the 19% indicated in the studies. I think HSV works a little differently than HPV -- HPV is perhaps less mobile? HSV hides out in the ganglia near your spine, where antibodies are not allowed to roam, and when it thinks the antibodies aren't looking or are weak, it makes a sprint out to the skin, usually following the path of the nerves it followed when it initially made its way in. My feeling is that instead of a stationary wart, with HSV you get an ongoing stream of virus for as long as it takes your antibodies to contain it all. The virus is constantly invading cells, using the cells' DNA to replicate itself indefinitely until the cell basically fills up and explodes and the exploded-out virus start looking for other cells to invade. I don't really know much of anything about HPV, but I assume the timeframe involved with HSV is much quicker than with HPV. So perhaps that is why once a day treatments might not work so well. That said, it could also have been because, as I said, I got started with my treatments after lesions had already appeared on the skin. There is a possibility that if I would have treated the outer skin with RSV before the HSV got there, the problems might have still been going on underneath, but without ever breaking out onto the surface of the skin (which would be good enough as far as I'm concerned).




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