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Levels of resveratrol in cocoa products


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#1 malbecman

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Posted 03 September 2008 - 08:59 PM


Looks like cocoa products come in 2nd to red wine in terms of resveratrol levels. Another good reason to take cocoa and maybe try Maxwatt's chocolate-resveratrol..... :)
(I added the bold emphasis to the last line)


J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Aug 30.
Survey of the trans-Resveratrol and trans-Piceid Content of Cocoa-Containing and Chocolate Products.
Hurst WJ, Glinski JA, Miller KB, Apgar J, Davey MH, Stuart DA.
Dietary resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene) has been implicated in the health benefits associated with grapes and red wine, more specifically with potential benefits for metabolic syndrome, energy use, and increased endurance. Levels of trans-resveratrol and its glucoside, trans-piceid, were determined in 19 top selling commercially available cocoa-containing and chocolate products from the U.S. market. Amounts of trans-resveratrol and trans-piceid were closely correlated with the amount of nonfat cocoa solids (NFCS) in the cocoa-containing products. Among these products, trans-resveratrol levels were highest in cocoa powders (1.85 +/- 0.43 mug/g), followed by unsweetened baking chocolates (1.24 +/- 0.22), semisweet chocolate baking chips (0.52 +/- 0.14), dark chocolates (0.35 +/- 0.08), milk chocolates (0.10 +/- 0.05), and chocolate syrups (0.09 +/- 0.02). These cocoa-containing and chocolate products have about 3-5 times more trans-piceid than trans-resveratrol. Levels of trans-piceid were highest in the cocoa powders (7.14 +/- 0.80 mug/g), followed by unsweetened baking chocolates (4.04 +/- 0.14), semisweet chocolate baking chips (2.01 +/- 0.18), dark chocolates (1.82 +/- 0.36), milk chocolates (0.44 +/- 0.06), and chocolate syrups (0.35 +/- 0.06). On an equal weight basis, cocoa powder had about half as much trans-resveratrol as the average California red wine. On a per serving basis, cocoa-containing and chocolate products had less trans-resveratrol than red wine and grape juice but more than roasted peanuts. Overall, these cocoa-containing and chocolate products rank second after red wines and grape juice in foods with the highest levels of total trans-resveratrol in the diet.

PMID: 18759443

#2 DukeNukem

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Posted 03 September 2008 - 09:58 PM

Looks like cocoa products come in 2nd to red wine in terms of resveratrol levels. Another good reason to take cocoa and maybe try Maxwatt's chocolate-resveratrol..... :)
(I added the bold emphasis to the last line)


J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Aug 30.
Survey of the trans-Resveratrol and trans-Piceid Content of Cocoa-Containing and Chocolate Products.
Hurst WJ, Glinski JA, Miller KB, Apgar J, Davey MH, Stuart DA.
Dietary resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene) has been implicated in the health benefits associated with grapes and red wine, more specifically with potential benefits for metabolic syndrome, energy use, and increased endurance. Levels of trans-resveratrol and its glucoside, trans-piceid, were determined in 19 top selling commercially available cocoa-containing and chocolate products from the U.S. market. Amounts of trans-resveratrol and trans-piceid were closely correlated with the amount of nonfat cocoa solids (NFCS) in the cocoa-containing products. Among these products, trans-resveratrol levels were highest in cocoa powders (1.85 +/- 0.43 mug/g), followed by unsweetened baking chocolates (1.24 +/- 0.22), semisweet chocolate baking chips (0.52 +/- 0.14), dark chocolates (0.35 +/- 0.08), milk chocolates (0.10 +/- 0.05), and chocolate syrups (0.09 +/- 0.02). These cocoa-containing and chocolate products have about 3-5 times more trans-piceid than trans-resveratrol. Levels of trans-piceid were highest in the cocoa powders (7.14 +/- 0.80 mug/g), followed by unsweetened baking chocolates (4.04 +/- 0.14), semisweet chocolate baking chips (2.01 +/- 0.18), dark chocolates (1.82 +/- 0.36), milk chocolates (0.44 +/- 0.06), and chocolate syrups (0.35 +/- 0.06). On an equal weight basis, cocoa powder had about half as much trans-resveratrol as the average California red wine. On a per serving basis, cocoa-containing and chocolate products had less trans-resveratrol than red wine and grape juice but more than roasted peanuts. Overall, these cocoa-containing and chocolate products rank second after red wines and grape juice in foods with the highest levels of total trans-resveratrol in the diet.

PMID: 18759443


Interesting. I wonder if this little amount of resveratrol is responsible for any of the reported benefits of cocoa. I suspect so. The question is, How much benefit comes from cocoa other than from the resveratrol it contains?

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#3 maxwatt

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Posted 04 September 2008 - 01:23 AM

Looks like cocoa products come in 2nd to red wine in terms of resveratrol levels. Another good reason to take cocoa and maybe try Maxwatt's chocolate-resveratrol..... :)
(I added the bold emphasis to the last line)


J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Aug 30.
Survey of the trans-Resveratrol and trans-Piceid Content of Cocoa-Containing and Chocolate Products.
Hurst WJ, Glinski JA, Miller KB, Apgar J, Davey MH, Stuart DA.
Dietary resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene) has been implicated in the health benefits associated with grapes and red wine, more specifically with potential benefits for metabolic syndrome, energy use, and increased endurance. Levels of trans-resveratrol and its glucoside, trans-piceid, were determined in 19 top selling commercially available cocoa-containing and chocolate products from the U.S. market. Amounts of trans-resveratrol and trans-piceid were closely correlated with the amount of nonfat cocoa solids (NFCS) in the cocoa-containing products. Among these products, trans-resveratrol levels were highest in cocoa powders (1.85 +/- 0.43 mug/g), followed by unsweetened baking chocolates (1.24 +/- 0.22), semisweet chocolate baking chips (0.52 +/- 0.14), dark chocolates (0.35 +/- 0.08), milk chocolates (0.10 +/- 0.05), and chocolate syrups (0.09 +/- 0.02). These cocoa-containing and chocolate products have about 3-5 times more trans-piceid than trans-resveratrol. Levels of trans-piceid were highest in the cocoa powders (7.14 +/- 0.80 mug/g), followed by unsweetened baking chocolates (4.04 +/- 0.14), semisweet chocolate baking chips (2.01 +/- 0.18), dark chocolates (1.82 +/- 0.36), milk chocolates (0.44 +/- 0.06), and chocolate syrups (0.35 +/- 0.06). On an equal weight basis, cocoa powder had about half as much trans-resveratrol as the average California red wine. On a per serving basis, cocoa-containing and chocolate products had less trans-resveratrol than red wine and grape juice but more than roasted peanuts. Overall, these cocoa-containing and chocolate products rank second after red wines and grape juice in foods with the highest levels of total trans-resveratrol in the diet.

PMID: 18759443


Interesting. I wonder if this little amount of resveratrol is responsible for any of the reported benefits of cocoa. I suspect so. The question is, How much benefit comes from cocoa other than from the resveratrol it contains?


Cocoa also has EGCG, maybe more than green tea.

#4 krillin

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Posted 04 September 2008 - 03:18 AM

To equal one serving of that silly Shaklee product you'd need to eat almost 18 kg of cocoa powder. (33,000 mcg res x 1 g cocoa/1.85 mcg res).

Cocoa has lots of C and EC, but no EGCG or other catechins.

#5 maxwatt

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Posted 04 September 2008 - 03:46 AM

To equal one serving of that silly Shaklee product you'd need to eat almost 18 kg of cocoa powder. (33,000 mcg res x 1 g cocoa/1.85 mcg res).

Cocoa has lots of C and EC, but no EGCG or other catechins.

Not none, according to some sources: Extracts of cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) leaves and their antioxidation potential

#6 krillin

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Posted 04 September 2008 - 11:18 PM

To equal one serving of that silly Shaklee product you'd need to eat almost 18 kg of cocoa powder. (33,000 mcg res x 1 g cocoa/1.85 mcg res).

Cocoa has lots of C and EC, but no EGCG or other catechins.

Not none, according to some sources: Extracts of cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) leaves and their antioxidation potential

From the abstract it looks like they analyzed shoots and leaves, but not beans.

#7 zawy

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Posted 19 September 2008 - 01:39 PM

In other words, I can cut out my dark chocolate to avoid sugar and saturated fat since I'm taking resveratrol and thereby eat a different plant food to make up for the missing calories?

#8 lucid

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Posted 19 September 2008 - 04:31 PM

In other words, I can cut out my dark chocolate to avoid sugar and saturated fat since I'm taking resveratrol and thereby eat a different plant food to make up for the missing calories?

Nope. As krillin said you don't get close to a therapeutic dose of resveratrol from any reasonable amount of cocoa. The putative reason people take cocoa is for the Epicatechin content and not the resveratrol.

Edited by lucid, 19 September 2008 - 04:32 PM.


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#9 tintinet

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Posted 19 September 2008 - 08:32 PM

In other words, I can cut out my dark chocolate to avoid sugar and saturated fat since I'm taking resveratrol and thereby eat a different plant food to make up for the missing calories?

Nope. As krillin said you don't get close to a therapeutic dose of resveratrol from any reasonable amount of cocoa. The putative reason people take cocoa is for the Epicatechin content and not the resveratrol.



Heck, I just takes it 'cause it tastes good!




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