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Nerve Growth Factor and Longevity


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#1 Reven

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Posted 25 April 2009 - 12:21 PM


Interesting article...

http://www.independe...fe-1674005.html


Most centenarians attribute their great age to some magic elixir or other. The longevity of the Italian scientist Rita Levi-Montalcini, who this week became the first Nobel Prize-winner to reach the age of 100, might be the result of a potion that is a little out of the ordinary: Professor Levi-Montalcini, it is said, puts her undiminished mental vigour down to regular doses of nerve growth factor (NGF) – the discovery that made her famous.

She was awarded the 1986 Nobel Prize for Medicine jointly with an American, Stanley Cohen, for her research into NGF: the proteins and amino-acids which enable the cells of the nervous system to grow and take on specialised tasks. Despite her age, Dr Levi-Montalcini, a neurologist and development biologist, still works every day at the European Brain Research Institute, which she founded in Rome.

During numerous celebrations this week, she claimed that her brain was more vigorous today than it was four decades ago. "If I'm not mistaken," she said, "I can say my mental capacity is greater than when I was 20 because it has been enriched by so many experiences, in the same way that my curiosity and desire to be close to those who suffer has not diminished."

According to Pietro Calissano, who collaborated with the professor on an article for Scientific American in which she announced her discovery in 1979, NGF may have played a direct role in her amazing vitality. "Every day, she takes NGF in the form of eye drops," he said, "but I can't say for sure if this is her secret. At the start, it seemed this molecule's effect was restricted to acting on the peripheral nervous system, but then it emerged that it has a very important role in the brain. Contrary to what was believed, the brain does not have a rigid structure but is in continuous movement, and NGF helps neurons – which we begin to lose between 10 and 15 years old – survive."

Italy pulled out all the stops to honour Dr Levi-Montalcini, with parties, seminars and more awards to add to her pile. Most appreciated of all was a decision by the universities ministry to award her research institute a grant of €500,000 (£448,000). She said: "The scientific director of the institute and I have spent many days wondering how to solve our financial problems." The money gives the institute a few more months' lease of life."

Dr Levi-Montalcini also praised her homeland, adding: "I say to the young, be happy that you were born in Italy because of the beauty of the human capital, both masculine and feminine, of this country ... No other country has such human capital."

Yet the country she loves did all in its power to curtail her career before it began. She was born to a cultured Jewish family in Turin in 1909, the daughter of an electrical engineer and a painter. Defying her father's wishes, she went to medical school and graduated in 1936. She immediately enrolled as a postgraduate, but in the same year Mussolini published his Manifesto for the Defence of the Race, followed in 1938 by new laws banning "inferior races" from education and forcing her out of university.

"Don't fear difficult moments," she said, "the best comes from them." But her "difficult moments" were to last nearly 10 years. She fled to Belgium to continue her studies, but the imminent invasion of the Nazis in 1940 forced her to return to Turin, where she constructed a laboratory in her bedroom. When the Allies bombed the city in 1941, she fled to the countryside and built another lab in a country cottage. Then the German invasion of Italy in 1943 sent her fleeing to Florence, where she lived incognito until the war's end, working as a nurse and doctor among the disease-ridden refugees. After the war she accepted an invitation to study in America, where in the subsequent decades her most important work was done. She only returned to Italy full time after she retired in 1977.

Dr Levi-Montalcini was made a senator for life in 2001 and from 2005 to 2007 she played a vital role in supporting the centre-left government of Romano Prodi, which had a wafer-thin Senate majority and needed every vote to stay afloat. Despite her age, Dr Levi-Montalcini never failed it, earning the wrath of the right-wing opposition in the process.

#2 tunt01

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Posted 25 April 2009 - 01:19 PM

http://www.sciencedi...3ac2c0f44b75808

Abstract

It has been shown that conjunctivally applied NGF in rats can reach the retina and optic nerve. Whether topical eye NGF application reaches the central nervous system is not known. In the present study, we have addressed this question. It was found that topical eye NGF application affects brain cells. Time-course studies revealed that repeated NGF application leads to high concentration of this neurotrophins after 6 h and normal levels after 24 h. Our results also showed that topical eye application of NGF causes an enhanced expression of NGF receptors and ChAT immunoreactivity in forebrain cholinergic neurons, suggesting that ocular NGF application could have a functional role on damaged brain cells. The present findings suggest that eye NGF application can represent an alternative route to prevent degeneration of NGF-receptive neurons involved in disorders such as Alzheimer and Parkinson.



http://www3.intersci...l...=1&SRETRY=0

Eye drop NGF administration promotes the recovery of chemically injured cholinergic neurons of adult mouse forebrain

We have recently shown that conjunctivally applied nerve growth factor (NGF) in rats can reach the retina, the optic nerve and the CNS. In the present study, we investigated whether NGF application as collyrium can promote the recovery of chemically injured basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. NGF was administered on the eye of adult male mice previously treated i.c.v. with ibotenic acid to impair cholinergic pathways. Mice were tested in the passive avoidance test, and after 2 weeks of NGF administration were killed and the brains used for structural, biochemical and molecular analyses. The results showed that application of NGF on the eye surface protected choline acetyl transferase levels. These findings strengthen the hypothesis that application of NGF on the eye can represent an alternative delivery route to promote the recovery of brain cells during degeneration, including neurons involved in learning and memory activities.


it sounds appealing on the surface, but wouldn't there be a material cancer risk like with any hormone/growth factor?

Edited by prophets, 25 April 2009 - 01:39 PM.


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#3 guaif1

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Posted 26 April 2009 - 01:38 AM

http://www.sciencedi...3ac2c0f44b75808

Abstract

It has been shown that conjunctivally applied NGF in rats can reach the retina and optic nerve. Whether topical eye NGF application reaches the central nervous system is not known. In the present study, we have addressed this question. It was found that topical eye NGF application affects brain cells. Time-course studies revealed that repeated NGF application leads to high concentration of this neurotrophins after 6 h and normal levels after 24 h. Our results also showed that topical eye application of NGF causes an enhanced expression of NGF receptors and ChAT immunoreactivity in forebrain cholinergic neurons, suggesting that ocular NGF application could have a functional role on damaged brain cells. The present findings suggest that eye NGF application can represent an alternative route to prevent degeneration of NGF-receptive neurons involved in disorders such as Alzheimer and Parkinson.



http://www3.intersci...l...=1&SRETRY=0

Eye drop NGF administration promotes the recovery of chemically injured cholinergic neurons of adult mouse forebrain

We have recently shown that conjunctivally applied nerve growth factor (NGF) in rats can reach the retina, the optic nerve and the CNS. In the present study, we investigated whether NGF application as collyrium can promote the recovery of chemically injured basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. NGF was administered on the eye of adult male mice previously treated i.c.v. with ibotenic acid to impair cholinergic pathways. Mice were tested in the passive avoidance test, and after 2 weeks of NGF administration were killed and the brains used for structural, biochemical and molecular analyses. The results showed that application of NGF on the eye surface protected choline acetyl transferase levels. These findings strengthen the hypothesis that application of NGF on the eye can represent an alternative delivery route to promote the recovery of brain cells during degeneration, including neurons involved in learning and memory activities.


it sounds appealing on the surface, but wouldn't there be a material cancer risk like with any hormone/growth factor?



does anyone know if there is a product, NGF, that can be purchased?

#4 mrak1979

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Posted 29 April 2009 - 03:26 AM

I'd be interested also.... anybody know?

#5 Bluenoise

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Posted 29 April 2009 - 10:59 PM

does anyone know if there is a product, NGF, that can be purchased?



Only for research use that I know of. Even if they sold it to you it would be extreemly expensive.

#6 Bluenoise

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Posted 30 April 2009 - 01:11 AM

*ahem*
http://www.prospecbi...CFSMeDQodkBWe9Q

Pretty expensive. They take credit card so you don't need a PO to order.

Edited by Bluenoise, 30 April 2009 - 01:41 AM.


#7 youandme

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Posted 30 April 2009 - 04:07 AM

Sounds fascinating..have they tried it out on any humans yet ...if not why not ?!

#8 zorba990

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Posted 30 April 2009 - 06:47 PM

Sounds fascinating..have they tried it out on any humans yet ...if not why not ?!


What about using acetyl l-carnitine arginate ?
http://www.iherb.com...sules/2495?at=0

#9 tunt01

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Posted 30 April 2009 - 07:45 PM

anything that stimulates growth hormone should in turn stimulate NGF/BDNF. I would think alpha-gpc would be ideal.

I would still like to know Dr. Levi-Montalcini's regimen... exactly how many drops, concentration of the NGF (in saline?), when, etc...

#10 bgwithadd

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Posted 13 May 2009 - 08:13 PM

Question is, what will you get from a microgram? You might get a lot more out of trying to up in it other ways like lithium, brewer's yeast, choline, PS, lecithin, etc.

#11 Lufega

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Posted 16 July 2009 - 11:08 PM

I was just reading about her research and was going to post about it. She lived to 100 without any obvious complications with hormones imbalances, cancer, etc. Does it say anywhere how long she's been using the drops? We need a source of this stuff, fast!

#12 Doc Eight or DE

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Posted 16 July 2009 - 11:21 PM

So advantages of using NGF from there source vs cobra venom would be?

#13 RighteousReason

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Posted 16 July 2009 - 11:29 PM

http://findarticles....ag=content;col1

#14 tunt01

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Posted 16 July 2009 - 11:59 PM

I was just reading about her research and was going to post about it. She lived to 100 without any obvious complications with hormones imbalances, cancer, etc. Does it say anywhere how long she's been using the drops? We need a source of this stuff, fast!


I thought about this also, and tried to surf around and find the answer online for a few hours (to no avail). I also didn't see any human studies with in vivo usage of NGF when I looked (to try to find dosage guidelines). You can buy NGF (I looked into it), but you don't know how she's diluting it or what she's doing regimen-wise. I know an Italian researcher who analyzes BCAA/Whey protein for sarcopenia treatment and I thought about trying to have him ask her, but I decided against it.

You'd really have to track down exactly what she's doing and then analyze that against your other options. And her genetic make-up is not yours. You may still be risking a glioma, etc.

#15 Lufega

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Posted 17 July 2009 - 03:27 AM

http://findarticles....ag=content;col1


Thanks for this article. I have an old bottle of lion's mane I restarted using. This is a great little supp and I feel a slight improvement in cognitive function. I don't know why I put it down in the first place.

#16 Anthony

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Posted 17 July 2009 - 04:18 AM

Thanks for this article. I have an old bottle of lion's mane I restarted using. This is a great little supp and I feel a slight improvement in cognitive function. I don't know why I put it down in the first place.



The article is discussing another drug but mentions NGF. It states that NGF cannot pass through the blood brain barrier. Maybe it is referring to NGF which is ingested orally?

http://www.medicalne...cles/155547.php

Edited by Anthony, 17 July 2009 - 04:19 AM.


#17 tunt01

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Posted 17 July 2009 - 04:21 AM

The article is discussing another drug but mentions NGF. It states that NGF cannot pass through the blood brain barrier. Maybe it is referring to NGF which is ingested orally?


she did it through eye drops.

#18 Ben K

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Posted 17 July 2009 - 06:19 PM

Here's a patent application for "Use of nerve growth factor in eye-drops for therapy of pathologies of the central nervous system, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease":

http://www.freshpate...ype=description

http://www.faqs.org/...app/20090118177

"The possibility that NGF could exert a biological action on brain tissues following topical ophthalmic administration was hardly foreseeable, above all, in view of the fact that—as highlighted above—NGF is a molecule of considerable size (26,800 dalton) with a complex structure. In order for a molecule to have any action on brain tissues, then—once instilled on the eye surface—it must be able to pass through the eye tissues and reach the optic nerve and cerebrospinal fluid in order to exert its own biological activity on the brain region. In current practice, ocular administration is not used for treating brain pathologies. The foregoing is due to the fact that all the known studies concerning NGF use in brain pathologies have only employed intracerebral administration. "In actual fact, although having a complex structure and a high molecular weight, NGF has both hydrophilic and hydrophobic structural groups which enable it to pass through the homologous (lipid and hydrophilic) anatomical barriers. Moreover, a fundamental feature of NGF is that once it reaches the target organs even at very low, but biologically active, concentrations, it can stimulate the endogenous production of NGF by the tissue itself. The presence of an endogenous fraction of NGF is clearly borne out by the results of experiments (which will be illustrated below) on the passage of NGF through tissues. These results also show that a concentration gradient is not maintained from the external surface of the eye towards the brain, as had been hypothesised for a simple diffusion mechanism through tissues.

"In order to produce the preparation according to the present invention, suitable procedures for NGF extraction and purification are reported in the aforesaid literature. The technique of Bocchini and Angeletti, briefly reported here, was used for experiments concerning the present invention. Submandibular glands of adult male mice are extracted in sterile conditions and the tissues thereof are homogenised, centrifuged and dialysed. The suspension is then made to pass through successive cellulose columns, whereon the NGF is adsorbed. The NGF is then eluted from the column by means of a 0.4 M sodium chloride buffer. The samples thus obtained are analysed spectrophotometrically at a wavelength of 280 nm to identify the NGF containing fractions. These fractions are dialysed and the NGF is lyophilised in sterile conditions and refrigerated at −20° C.

"A medicinal product according to the present invention and suitable for ocular surface administration preferably contains, either alone or in association with one or more other active ingredients, between 1 and 1000 μg/ml of NGF. If the product is in the form of an aqueous solution (eye-drops), the NGF concentration may preferably be in the range 10-500 μg/ml, and still more preferably in the range 200-250 μg/ml. A specific formulation for eye-drops may contain, for example, 200 μg/ml of NGF in a 0.9% sodium chloride physiological solution, or in a balanced saline solution (BSS®): in both cases, the solution is isotonic with tear fluid and thus well tolerated by the eye. However, it is also possible to use hypotonic solutions."

#19 tunt01

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Posted 17 July 2009 - 06:43 PM

http://www.prospecbi..._Growth_Factor/

at $1,000 for 100 ug, if i'm doing the math right, that's like $60,000 for a 200 ug/ml solution. bit pricey. i know there were NGF tests done through intranasal administration; not sure which has better efficacy or price/performance advantage.

#20 tunt01

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Posted 16 April 2010 - 02:43 AM

http://circres.ahajo...full/106/7/1275

Nerve Growth Factor Promotes Cardiac Repair following Myocardial Infarction



not only repairs the brain but also the heart after myocardial infarction. pretty amazing. maybe it's why this woman has lived for so long. wonder what the cancer risk is...


Lion's Mane = cardiac repair

#21 outsider

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Posted 18 April 2010 - 09:22 AM

http://circres.ahajo...full/106/7/1275

Nerve Growth Factor Promotes Cardiac Repair following Myocardial Infarction



not only repairs the brain but also the heart after myocardial infarction. pretty amazing. maybe it's why this woman has lived for so long. wonder what the cancer risk is...


Lion's Mane = cardiac repair


Exactly just take Lion's mane, Ashitaba (20% increase in NGF in studies) and Jatamansi (organic since it is an endangered species)

Nardosinone [from Jatamansi] , the first enhancer of neurite outgrowth-promoting activity of staurosporine and dibutyryl cyclic AMP in PC12D cells

Ping Li, Kimihiro Matsunaga, Tohru Yamakuni and Yasushi Ohizumi ,
Department of Pharmaceutical Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tohoku University, Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba, Sendai 980-8578, Japan
Accepted 30 July 2003. ;
Available online 11 September 2003.

Abstract
Nardosinone was isolated as an enhancer of nerve growth factor (NGF) from Nardostachys chinensis [Neurosci. Lett. 273 (1999) 53]. Nardosinone (0.1–100 μM) enhanced dibutyryl cyclic AMP (dbcAMP, 0.3 mM)- and staurosporine (10 nM)-induced neurite outgrowth from PC12D cells in a concentration-dependent manner. PD98059 (20 μM), a potent mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase inhibitor, partially blocked enhancements of dbcAMP (0.3 mM)- or staurosporine (10 nM)-induced neurite outgrowth by nardosinone. Nardosinone alone had no effect on the phosphorylation of MAP kinase. The dbcAMP-induced increase in phosphorylation of MAP kinase was not affected by nardosinone. Staurosporine almost unaffected the phosphorylation of MAP kinase, and nardosinone potentiated the staurosporine-induced neurite outgrowth without stimulation of the phosphorylation of MAP kinase. Since it is known that MAP kinase signaling is required for neurite outgrowth in PC12D cells, these results suggest that nardosinone enhances staurosporine- or dbcAMP-induced neurite outgrowth from PC12D cells, probably by amplifying both the MAP kinase-dependent and -independent signaling pathways of dbcAMP and staurosporine. It is also suggested that nardosinone enhances a downstream step of MAP kinase in the MAP kinase-dependent signaling pathway. Nardosinone is the first enhancer of the neuritogenic action of dbcAMP and staurosporine and may become a useful pharmacological tool for studying the mechanism of action of not only NGF but also both the neuritogenic substances.

#22 chrono

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Posted 18 April 2010 - 11:20 AM

Indeed, Lion's Mane, idebenone, ashitaba, cerebrolysin, and regular ALCAR (in addition to increased effectiveness of the arginate), among others, have all been shown to induce increases in NGF. These are discussed on the board in different threads. All more practical (and cheaper!) options for achieving this goal, I think.

Edited by chrono, 18 April 2010 - 11:59 AM.


#23 GhostBuster

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Posted 18 April 2010 - 01:55 PM

Indeed, Lion's Mane, idebenone, ashitaba, cerebrolysin, and regular ALCAR (in addition to increased effectiveness of the arginate), among others, have all been shown to induce increases in NGF. These are discussed on the board in different threads. All more practical (and cheaper!) options for achieving this goal, I think.


And what about vitamin A and D, lithium, zinc and others?

Vitamin A

Retinoic Acid Regulates Both Expressiono f the Nerve Growth Factor
Receptor and Sensitivity to Nerve Growth Factor*

http://www.jbc.org/c.../17611.full.pdf

Increased nerve growth factor by zinc supplementation with concurrent vitamin A deficiency does not improve memory performance in mice
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/17330505

Retinoic acid induces NGF-dependent survival response and high-affinity
NGF receptors in immature chick sympathetic neurons

http://dev.biologist.../3/813.full.pdf

Modulation of retinoid signalling through NGF-induced nuclear export of NGFI-B
http://www.nature.co...cb0700_435.html

Nerve growth factor and retinoic acid interactions in the
control of small cell lung cancer proliferation

http://www.eje-onlin...t/147/3/371.pdf


Vitamin D3

A vitamin D3 derivative (CB1093) induces nerve growth factor and prevents neurotrophic deficits in streptozotocin-diabetic rats
http://www.springerl...0vnj8k6neu17bc/

Tacalcitol, an Active Vitamin D3, Induces Nerve Growth Factor Production in Human Epidermal Keratinocytes
http://content.karge...p;file=sph14226

1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Induction of Nerve Growth Factor in L929 Mouse Fibroblasts: Effect of Vitamin D Receptor Regulation and Potency of Vitamin D3 Analogs
http://endo.endojour...t/full/138/1/12

Lithium

Lithium increases nerve growth factor levels in the rat hippocampus in an animal model of mania
http://journals.lww....evels_in.3.aspx

Subchronic treatment with lithium increases nerve growth factor content in distinct brain regions of adult rats.
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/12140783

Lithium treatment alters brain concentrations of nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor in a rat model of depression
http://journals.camb...l...&aid=178305


----

Effect of zinc supplementation on mood states in young women: a pilot study
http://www.nutraingr...epression-Study


Blueberry-induced changes in spatial working memory correlate with changes in hippocampal CREB phosphorylation and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels
http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/18457678

Increased spinal cord NGF levels in rats with cobalamin (vitamin B12) deficiency
Neuroscience Letters, Volume 396, Issue 2, Pages 153-158

Edited by GhostBuster, 18 April 2010 - 02:54 PM.


#24 VespeneGas

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Posted 18 April 2010 - 08:00 PM

I am quite hesitant to tinker too much with vitamin A status via supplementation ever since being prescribed accutane back in high school, which brought on some pretty severe brain fog, depression, and skin problems. I suspect that my body continues to underexpress biotinidase as a result of that godawful drug. Personal crap aside, it is a powerful hormone, and retinol supplementation will inevitably carry unintended consequences in the absence of an insufficiency/deficiency (increased all-cause mortality and osteoporosis risks spring to mind...).

Having sufficient amounts of A, D, and zinc are certainly highly recommended though. I find the research on lithium promising, and was taking 5mg/day for a while but found it a little too sedating/grumpifying (yup, the act of rendering someone grumpy), so I've settled at 1 mg/day, which is commensurate with the proposed RDA:

Journal of the American College of Nutrition, Vol. 21, No. 1, 14-21 (2002)

Lithium: Occurrence, Dietary Intakes, Nutritional Essentiality

Gerhard N. Schrauzer, PhD, CNS, FACN
Lithium is found in variable amounts in foods; primary food sources are grains and vegetables; in some areas, the drinking water also provides significant amounts of the element. Human dietary lithium intakes depend on location and the type of foods consumed and vary over a wide range. Traces of lithium were detected in human organs and fetal tissues already in the late 19th century, leading to early suggestions as to possible specific functions in the organism. However, it took another century until evidence for the essentiality of lithium became available. In studies conducted from the 1970s to the 1990s, rats and goats maintained on low-lithium rations were shown to exhibit higher mortalities as well as reproductive and behavioral abnormalities. In humans defined lithium deficiency diseases have not been characterized, but low lithium intakes from water supplies were associated with increased rates of suicides, homicides and the arrest rates for drug use and other crimes. Lithium appears to play an especially important role during the early fetal development as evidenced by the high lithium contents of the embryo during the early gestational period. The biochemical mechanisms of action of lithium appear to be multifactorial and are intercorrelated with the functions of several enzymes, hormones and vitamins, as well as with growth and transforming factors. The available experimental evidence now appears to be sufficient to accept lithium as essential; a provisional RDA for a 70 kg adult of 1000 µg/day is suggested.

Free full text available here.


Excellent first post btw; welcome!
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#25 tunt01

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Posted 18 April 2010 - 08:36 PM

Having sufficient amounts of A, D, and zinc are certainly highly recommended though. I find the research on lithium promising, and was taking 5mg/day for a while but found it a little too sedating/grumpifying (yup, the act of rendering someone grumpy), so I've settled at 1 mg/day, which is commensurate with the proposed RDA:



I also find 1 mg/day a better level than 5mg/day. I was curious how to take it. The lowest doses all seem to be 5 mg. I'm just leaving the emptied portions of a capsule laying around until I use them over 5 days. I was wondering if you had any smarter method.

thx

pro

#26 chrono

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Posted 18 April 2010 - 08:39 PM

And what about vitamin A and D, lithium, zinc and others?

What about em? :) Great post, I didn't know that many of these modulated NGF. Lithium should definitely have been on my list. And blueberries! Though I wasn't trying to be comprehensive, by any means—only pointing out that there are other common supplements to achieve this end, which should be mentioned in this context.

In several respects zinc and vitamins A and D don't look as useful for increasing NGF beyond normal levels as the agents mentioned previously. It seems healthy levels of A and zinc are necessary for NGF to function properly, and supplementation of all three in healthy levels may afford a small boost.

Most appreciated of all was a decision by the universities ministry to award her research institute a grant of €500,000 (£448,000). She said: "The scientific director of the institute and I have spent many days wondering how to solve our financial problems."

All their money was dropped into her eyes!

Seriously, a drop in each eye of a 200μg/ml solution would be about $200/day at the price listed. Though I suppose if you're capable of chromatographing it from mouse tissues, the price would drop considerably.

Edited by chrono, 18 April 2010 - 08:41 PM.


#27 VespeneGas

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Posted 19 April 2010 - 02:31 AM

I also find 1 mg/day a better level than 5mg/day. I was curious how to take it. The lowest doses all seem to be 5 mg. I'm just leaving the emptied portions of a capsule laying around until I use them over 5 days. I was wondering if you had any smarter method.

thx

pro


Heh, I just leave a capsule on top of my container of whey protein so I remember to empty ~1/5 of it into my smoothie every morning. No high-tech strategies yet :)

#28 e Volution

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Posted 19 April 2010 - 07:16 AM

Having sufficient amounts of A, D, and zinc are certainly highly recommended though. I find the research on lithium promising, and was taking 5mg/day for a while but found it a little too sedating/grumpifying (yup, the act of rendering someone grumpy), so I've settled at 1 mg/day, which is commensurate with the proposed RDA:



I also find 1 mg/day a better level than 5mg/day. I was curious how to take it. The lowest doses all seem to be 5 mg. I'm just leaving the emptied portions of a capsule laying around until I use them over 5 days. I was wondering if you had any smarter method.

thx

pro

Would dissolving it in water degrade it at all? I was thinking about just mixing a capsule into a vial of water and having a 1/5th sip each day

#29 tunt01

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Posted 19 April 2010 - 10:20 AM

Would dissolving it in water degrade it at all? I was thinking about just mixing a capsule into a vial of water and having a 1/5th sip each day



yea i may do that also. right now it looks like lines of cocaine cut in 5 lines with a credit card on a piece of paper.

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#30 chrono

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Posted 19 April 2010 - 11:02 AM

If you guys are talking about lithium orotate, it's listed as "hardly soluble" in water. If you can get it to go into solution, I don't imagine that it would degrade at all in the short term.




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