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List of people with IQ's over 200


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#1 bacopa

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 01:50 AM


http://www.eoht.info/page/IQ:+200%2B
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#2 niner

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 02:45 AM

http://www.eoht.info/page/IQ:+200%2B

An impressive group of people with some real accomplishments to their names. Chris Langan is a bit of an outlier. He worked as a bouncer in some biker bar, last I heard.
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#3 bacopa

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 03:25 AM

He still is a bouncer and has a supposedly comprehensive theory on mind and the universe. I think he thinks that the universe has a consciounce although don't hold me to it. He does believe in heaven and some radical form of ID with evolution. Never heard of that. Shows that even geniuses or super geniuses can be delusional and just plain wrong.

I just found the site for his theory... http://www.ctmu.org/

Edited by dfowler, 11 June 2009 - 03:31 AM.

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#4 bacopa

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 05:06 AM

Many of the things he said in a video I saw show me he is immature in some of his thinking and lacks good insight. He also seems arrogant and he doesn't come across as overly intelligent.
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#5 sandra.Wa07

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Posted 12 June 2009 - 12:29 PM

Wow!! I actually had no idea that you can have an IQ over 200. I thought that something between 160 and 180 is the highest somebody can reach. I definitely do not belong to this elite. Unfortunately there are only two women on this list but I am of the opinion that there are definitely much more women who have such high IQs.
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#6 Reno

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Posted 13 June 2009 - 06:14 AM

How are they getting those IQ scores? The test hasn't even been around for a century yet.
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#7 bacopa

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Posted 13 June 2009 - 06:44 AM

How are they getting those IQ scores? The test hasn't even been around for a century yet.

I'm guessing it's some kind of estimation, but a good question.
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#8 Reno

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Posted 13 June 2009 - 06:53 AM

I just finished reading a bio and watching the little Chris Langan video interviews on youtube. He says his theories are about solving problems such as overpopulation, pollution etc. The more I listened the more I decided his ideas where about controlling problems through socialist means of propaganda and population control. By the time i finished watching his interview I felt sorry that someone who had so much potential could turn out to be so sad and bitter.

Most of these people spent their whole lives in the pursuit of their hobbies. The majority considered themselves philosophers in the pursuit of truth. I don't believe any one of them would have appreciated being compared and ranked on an intelligence scale like this. It just doesn't seem to do them or their work justice.

Edited by bobscrachy, 13 June 2009 - 06:57 AM.

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#9 HoosierDaddy?

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Posted 17 June 2009 - 07:14 PM

I must be the smartest person in the world because I noticed a problem. Please add my name to this list. :|w (humor is healthy so shove it)
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#10 HoosierDaddy?

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Posted 17 June 2009 - 07:31 PM

How are they getting those IQ scores? The test hasn't even been around for a century yet.


Likely estimation, given information about the events gone on in their life, their experiences, their findings, and their contribution to the scientific and educated society.

I say likely because I dont know either :|w

Edited by HoosierDaddy?, 17 June 2009 - 07:32 PM.

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#11 LET ME GET EM!

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Posted 18 June 2009 - 02:12 AM



There we go!

Edited by LET ME GET EM!, 18 June 2009 - 02:13 AM.

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#12 advancedatheist

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Posted 18 June 2009 - 03:15 AM

John Stuart Mill, whose name appears on that list, apparently benefited from an intellectual father willing to submit his son to an experiment in mind-building. From Mill's Autobiography:

I have no remembrance of the time when I began to learn Greek. I have been told that it was when I was three years old. My earliest recollection on the subject, is that of committing to memory what my father termed Vocables, being lists of common Greek words, with their signification in English, which he wrote out for me on cards. Of grammar, until some years later, I learnt no more than the inflexions of the nouns and verbs, but, after a course of vocables, proceeded at once to translation; and I faintly remember going through AEsop's Fables, the first Greek book which I read. The Anabasis, which I remember better, was the second. I learnt no Latin until my eighth year. At that time I had read, under my father's tuition, a number of Greek prose authors, among whom I remember the whole of Herodotus, and of Xenophon's Cyropaedia and Memorials of Socrates; some of the lives of the philosophers by Diogenes Laertius; part of Lucian, and Isocrates' ad Demonicum and ad Nicoclem. I also read, in 1813, the first six dialogues (in the common arrangement) of Plato, from the Euthyphron to the Theaetetus inclusive: which last dialogue, I venture to think, would have been better omitted, as it was totally impossible I should understand it. But my father, in all his teaching, demanded of me not only the utmost that I could do, but much that I could by no possibility have done. What he was himself willing to undergo for the sake of my instruction, may be judged from the fact, that I went through the whole process of preparing my Greek lessons in the same room and at the same table at which he was writing: and as in those days Greek and English lexicons were not, and I could make no more use of a Greek and Latin lexicon than could be made without having yet begun to learn Latin, I was forced to have recourse to him for the meaning of every word which I did not know. This incessant interruption, he, one of the most impatient of men, submitted to, and wrote under that interruption several volumes of his History and all else that he had to write during those years.

The only thing besides Greek, that I learnt as a lesson in this part of my childhood, was arithmetic: this also my father taught me: it was the task of the evenings, and I well remember its disagreeableness. But the lessons were only a part of the daily instruction I received. Much of it consisted in the books I read by myself, and my father's discourses to me, chiefly during our walks. From 1810 to the end of 1813 we were living in Newington Green, then an almost rustic neighbourhood. My father's health required considerable and constant exercise, and he walked habitually before breakfast, generally in the green lanes towards Hornsey. In these walks I always accompanied him, and with my earliest recollections of green fields and wild flowers, is mingled that of the account I gave him daily of what I had read the day before. To the best of my remembrance, this was a voluntary rather than a prescribed exercise. I made notes on slips of paper while reading, and from these, in the morning walks, I told the story to him; for the books were chiefly histories, of which I read in this manner a great number: Robertson's histories, Hume, Gibbon; but my greatest delight, then and for long afterwards, was Watson's Philip the Second and Third. The heroic defence of the Knights of Malta against the Turks, and of the revolted provinces of the Netherlands against Spain, exited in me an intense and lasting interest. Next to Watson, my favourite historical reading was Hooke's History of Rome. Of Greece I had seen at that time no regular history, except school abridgments and the first two or three volumes of a translation of Rollin's Ancient History, beginning with Philip of Macedon. But I read with great delight Langhorne's translation of Plutarch. In English history, beyond the time at which Hume leaves off, I remember reading Burnet's History of his Own Time, though I cared little for anything in it except the wars and battles; and the historical part of the Annual Register, from the beginning to about 1788, when the volumes my father borrowed for me from Mr Bentham left off. I felt a lively interest in Frederic of Prussia during his difficulties, and in Paoli, the Corsican patriot; but when I came to the American war, I took my part, like a child as I was (until set right by my father) on the wrong side, because it was called the English side. In these frequent talks about the books I read, he used, as opportunity offered, to give me explanations and ideas respecting civilization, government, morality, mental cultivation, which he required me afterwards to restate to him in my own words. He also made me read, and give him a verbal account of, many books which would not have interested me sufficiently to induce me to read them of myself: among others, Millar's Historical View of the English Government, a book of great merit for its time, and which he highly valued; Mosheim's Ecclesiastical History, McCrie's Life of John Knox, and even Sewel's and Rutty's Histories of the Quakers. He was fond of putting into my hands books which exhibited men of energy and resource in unusual circumstances, struggling against difficulties and overcoming them: of such works I remember Beaver's African Memoranda, and Collins's account of the first settlement of New South Wales. Two books which I never wearied of reading were Anson's Voyage, so delightful to most young persons, and a Collection (Hawkesworth's, I believe) of Voyages round the World, in four volumes, beginning with Drake and ending with Cook and Bougainville. Of children's books, any more than of playthings, I had scarcely any, except an occasional gift from a relation or acquaintance: among those I had, Robinson Crusoe was preeminent, and continued to delight me through all my boyhood. It was no part however of my father's system to exclude books of amusement, though he allowed them very sparingly. Of such books he possessed at that time next to none, but he borrowed several for me; those which I remember are the Arabian Nights, Cazotte's Arabian Tales, Don Quixote, Miss Edgeworth's "Popular Tales," and a book of some reputation in its day, Brooke's Fool of Quality.

In my eighth year I commenced learning Latin, in conjunction with a younger sister, to whom I taught it as I went on, and who afterwards repeated the lessons to my father: and from this time, other sisters and brothers being successively added as pupils, a considerable part of my day's work consisted of this preparatory teaching. It was a part which I greatly disliked; the more so, as I was held responsible for the lessons of my pupils, in almost as full a sense as for my own: I however derived from this discipline the great advantage of learning more thoroughly and retaining more lastingly the things which I was set to teach: perhaps, too, the practice it afforded in explaining difficulties to others, may even at that age have been useful. In other respects, the experience of my boyhood is not favourable to the plan of teaching children by means of one another. The teaching, I am sure, is very inefficient as teaching, and I well knew that the relation between teacher and taught is not a good moral discipline to either. I went in this manner through the Latin grammar, and a considerable part of Cornelius Nepos and Caesar's Commentaries, but afterwards added to the superintendence of these lessons, much longer ones of my own.

In the same year in which I began Latin, I made my first commencement in the Greek poet with the Iliad. After I had made some progress in this, my father put Pope's translation into my hands. It was the first English verse I had cared to read, and it became one of the books in which for many years I most delighted: I think I must have read it from twenty to thirty times through. I should not have thought it worth while to mention a taste apparently so natural to boyhood, if I had not, as I think, observed that the keen enjoyment of this brilliant specimen of narrative and versification is not so universal with boys, as I should have expected both a priori and from my individual experience. Soon after this time I commenced Euclid, and somewhat later, algebra, still under my father's tuition.

From my eighth to my twelfth year the Latin books which I remember reading were, the Bucolics of Virgil, and the first six books of the AEneid; all Horace except the Epodes; the Fables of Phaedrus; the first five books of Livy (to which from my love of the subject I voluntarily added, in my hours of leisure, the remainder of the first decade); all Sallust; a considerable part of Ovid's Metamorphoses; some plays of Terence; two or three books of Lucretius; several of the Orations of Cicero, and of his writings on oratory; also his letters to Atticus, my father taking the trouble to translate to me from the French the historical explanations in Mongault's notes. In Greek I read the Iliad and Odyssey through; one or two plays of Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes, though by these I profited little; all Thucydides; the Hellenics of Xenophon; a great part of Demosthenes, AEschines, and Lysias; Theocritus; Anacreon; part of the Anthology; a little of Dionysius; several books of Polybius; and lastly Aristotle's Rhetoric, which, as the first expressly scientific treatise on any moral or psychological subject which I had read, and containing many of the best observations of the ancients on human nature and life, my father made me study with peculiar care, and throw the matter of it into synoptic tables. During the same years I learnt elementary geometry and algebra thoroughly, the differential calculus and other portions of the higher mathematics far from thoroughly: for my father, not having kept up this part of his early acquired knowledge, could not spare time to qualify himself for removing my difficulties, and left me to deal with them, with little other aid than that of books; while I was continually incurring his displeasure by my inability to solve difficult problems for which he did not see that I had not the necessary previous knowledge.

As to my private reading, I can only speak of what I remember. History continued to be my strongest predilection, and most of all ancient history. Mitford's Greece I read continually; my father had put me on my guard against the Tory prejudices of this writer, and his perversions of facts for the white-washing of despot, and blackening of popular institutions. These points he discoursed on, exemplifying them from the Greek orators and historians, with such effect that in reading Mitford my sympathies were always on the contrary side to those of the author, and I could, to some extent, have argued the point against him: yet this did not diminish the ever new pleasure with which I read the book. Roman history, both in my old favourite, Hooke, and in Ferguson, continued to delight me. A book which, in spite of what is called the dryness of its style, I took great pleasure in, was the Ancient Universal History, through the incessant reading of which I had my head full of historical details concerning the obscurest ancient people, while about modern history, except detached passages, such as the Dutch war of independence, I knew and cared comparatively little. A voluntary exercise, to which throughout my boyhood I was much addicted, was what I called writing histories. I successively imposed a Roman history, picked out of Hooke; an abridgment of the Ancient Universal History; a History of Holland, from my favourite Watson and from an anonymous compilation; and in my eleventh and twelfth year I occupied myself with writing what I flattered myself was something serious. This was no less than a history of the Roman Government, compiled (with the assistance of Hooke) from Livy and Dionysius: of which I wrote as much as would have made an octavo volume, extending to the epoch of the Licinian Laws. It was, in fact, an account of the struggles between the patricians and plebeians, which now engrossed all the interest in my mind which I had previously felt in the mere wars and conquest of the Romans. I discussed all the institutional point as they arose: though quite ignorant of Niebuhr's researches, I, by such lights as my father had given me, vindicated the Agrarian Laws on the evidence of Livy, and upheld to the best of my ability the Roman democratic party. A few years later, in my contempt of my childish efforts, I destroyed all these papers, not then anticipating that I could ever feel any curiosity about my first attempt at writing and reasoning. My father encouraged me in this useful amusement, though, as I think judiciously, he never asked to see what I wrote; so that I did not feel that in writing it I was accountable to any one, nor had the chilling sensation of being under a critical eye.


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#13 EmbraceUnity

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Posted 18 June 2009 - 09:17 PM

Yes, JS Mill, like Mozart and many other prodigies, had very demanding and devoted parenting. Notably, however, both JS Mill and Mozart suffered nervous breakdowns. Unfortunately, I don't think anyone has found a reliable way to foster the growth of child prodigies in a way which doesn't contribute to psychological issues. Of course, geniuses by their nature have trouble fitting in, and have a more coherent grasp of the absurdities of the human condition. Though I have a feeling that the stuff David Pearce talks about, such as radical biotechnology, could go a long way towards alleviating this... but we aren't there yet.
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#14 Athanasios

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Posted 18 June 2009 - 09:41 PM

He does believe in heaven and some radical form of ID with evolution. Never heard of that. Shows that even geniuses or super geniuses can be delusional and just plain wrong

If you take away the belief in heaven, you are pretty close to a politically correct simulation argument.

BTW,
I am interested in the stories of geniouses who went through a specific transformative events (usually negative and psychologically painful ones) before they were considered genious or came about their accomplishments. Any leads would be appreciated.
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#15 advancedatheist

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Posted 18 June 2009 - 10:14 PM

Yes, JS Mill, like Mozart and many other prodigies, had very demanding and devoted parenting. Notably, however, both JS Mill and Mozart suffered nervous breakdowns. Unfortunately, I don't think anyone has found a reliable way to foster the growth of child prodigies in a way which doesn't contribute to psychological issues. Of course, geniuses by their nature have trouble fitting in, and have a more coherent grasp of the absurdities of the human condition.


You have to wonder how many potential prodigies like them pass unnoticed because they live in out of the way places or in ignorant, impoverished and dysfunctional societies which doom them to lives of manual labor. An efficient, modernized global civilization (assuming we ever develop to that point) wouldn't let those resources go to waste.
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#16 VictorBjoerk

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Posted 19 June 2009 - 12:49 AM

I think IQ number's should be taken with a grain of salt. it's silly when people boast with their IQ's.
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#17 Traclo

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Posted 19 June 2009 - 01:35 AM

How are they getting those IQ scores? The test hasn't even been around for a century yet.


I don't understand... why do IQ tests need to have been around for a century to measure IQs above 200?
Most modern IQ tests are based on the standard deviation of your performance on an IQ test compared to your peers.
I.e. if a person was 7 standard deviations above their peers (an extreme outlier) they would have an IQ of 205 (assuming that the test uses 15 IQ point increments... it can vary)
This would give them a percentile rank of ~100 (didn't want to look up the exact percent rank on a z table :))

Least as far as I know. Maybe I'm wrong...
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#18 treonsverdery

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Posted 19 June 2009 - 02:29 AM

Yes, JS Mill, like Mozart and many other prodigies, had very demanding and devoted parenting. Notably, however, both JS Mill and Mozart suffered nervous breakdowns. Unfortunately, I don't think anyone has found a reliable way to foster the growth of child prodigies in a way which doesn't contribute to psychological issues. Of course, geniuses by their nature have trouble fitting in, and have a more coherent grasp of the absurdities of the human condition.


You have to wonder how many potential prodigies like them pass unnoticed because they live in out of the way places or in ignorant, impoverished and dysfunctional societies which doom them to lives of manual labor. An efficient, modernized global civilization (assuming we ever develop to that point) wouldn't let those resources go to waste.


I have read that China is putting funds towards big physics as their government craves nobel prizes My minimal research suggests that PRChina has zero state recognized resident nobelists. A Taiwanese Chinese physicist has gotten a nobel prize for work done n China, as has a literature nobelist who emigrated; numerically though China has more than 60 times the population of TaiwanThats rather a bunch of hidden talent Perhaps as China permits civil liberties these peple will communicate Nationalism is the snack food of idiots though, thus carefully edging away from the snack tray I suggest a different idea

are there any things I can do to foster global cleverness

Write to the government of Iceland with a copy of this idea

I have read that China is putting funds towards big physics as their government craves nobel prizes A Taiwanese Chinese physicist has gotten a nobel prize for work done n China, as has a literature nobelist who emigrated; numerically though China has more than 60 times the population of TaiwanThats rather a bunch of hidden talent Perhaps as China permits civil liberties these peple will communicate Nationalism is the snack foosd of idiots though, thus carefully edging away from the snack tray I suggest a different idea

are there any things I can do to foster global cleverness

here are two things Iceland could do

Iceland could grant two EU citizenships to each person that solves problems from a list These citizenships would be fully transferrable, even auctionable A Chinese dissident could thus have a new place to live plus a big wad of cash from doing meaninful productive research This is absent cost to Iceland while promoting, rather nobel-like notable scientific as well as humanitarian advances

thing two:

basically I thought Norway should provide funds to create a New Icelandic branch of the European Patent Office so that people anywhere on earth could get a complimentary european patent at the Icelandic office

The scandinavian countries would get a year of first rights to the ideas People everywhere could have their go at making society more wonderful.

further based on the fact that MIT as well as perhaps UW Seattle's tech transfer offices are funded from royalties it might possibly be lucrative

The benefit to Iceland is the rapid formation of numerous companies to employ people as to use the technology during the first year a corporate entity would create an icelandic corporation

The benefit to Norway is that it builds the scandinavian group economy beyond electronics, manufacturing, renewable resources, petroleum plus they could rotate the complimentary patent country



here is a video version full of dancing girls I've noticed that dancing girl videos get 70 times more views at youtube
http://tinypic.com/r/2z83f5s/5

Edited by treonsverdery, 19 June 2009 - 02:44 AM.

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#19 LET ME GET EM!

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Posted 19 June 2009 - 06:34 PM

Wow! That's what's interesting... The video's that is.
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#20 Destiny's Equation

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 08:48 PM

My burnout was at age 15-17. Took up Benadryl abuse, was severely depressed and hell-bent on destroying myself.

(At first I was using it for studying, then eventually I tried to kill myself with it.)

My test administrators and I were shocked by the before-and-after. Everyone else just said "Brain damage? Nonsense! You are a clever girl." It made me want to kick them in the balls, no one understood.

Finally half a year ago I thought very, very hard about what it all meant and had an epiphany: I would never be depressed again. I disposed of my entire stash and decided that someday when I could afford it I would see a cutting-edge neurologist to rebuild what I had destroyed.

Then things went from bad to much, much worse ("aromatherapy disaster" thread). A friend recently called my IQ "above average" :(

We cannot change the past. We can only...go forward.
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#21 Alex Libman

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 05:35 AM

Humbug! You can't measure human intelligence on any linear scale.

And what's with this endless deification of Shakespeare and especially Einstein? They were no geniuses outside of their immediate fields, where some allegations of plagiarism continue to persist. Clearly neither was a dummy, but certainly nowhere close to the universal brainpower of da Vinci, Goethe, etc.

Given that there is some correlation between intelligence and shyness, it is very much plausible that some of the most intelligent people who've ever lived published their ideas through others.
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