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acetylcholine and depression


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#1 acantelopepope

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Posted 25 September 2009 - 08:54 PM


This is important for the many users of acetylcholine-geared nootropics and supplements in this community: http://www.psychosom...eprint/36/3/248

Thoughts?

Edit: If you can't get access to that, I've also uploaded the pdf. Attached File  acetylcholine_and_depression.pdf   649.57KB   63 downloads

Edited by acantelopepope, 25 September 2009 - 08:56 PM.


#2 Thorsten2

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 08:54 PM

This is important for the many users of acetylcholine-geared nootropics and supplements in this community: http://www.psychosom...eprint/36/3/248

Thoughts?

Edit: If you can't get access to that, I've also uploaded the pdf. Attached File  acetylcholine_and_depression.pdf   649.57KB   63 downloads


Is there anyone here who can actually explain what this is saying. I'm not thick but there are elements I find confusing and therefore I am not grasping what could potentialy be a very important message that would be in my interests to know.
Too much acetylcholine in central parts of the brain causes depression, is that the general message here?

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#3 MrSpud

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Posted 31 January 2010 - 07:13 PM

By "central", it would mean central nervous system as opposed to the peripheral nervous system. It wouldn't mean central parts of the brain but rather the whole central nervous system. Acetylcholine has lots of peripheral activities ranging from parastalysis of the gut (the rythmic movement in the gut that makes food pass through the digestion system) to things like rates of perspiration and how wet or dry mucous membranes are. It also affects CNS and affects more than memory, it effects conciousness itself and how you perceve the world.

I don't know if this info helps clarify it or not. Just pointing out what central is most likely referring to.

Edited by MrSpud, 31 January 2010 - 07:44 PM.





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