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Anti glycation supplements?


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#1 shazam

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 08:12 AM


I've heard some talk about them but I have no idea what they are. Anybody have any good sources they could point me towards?

Also, what are the supplements that work particularly well for this purpose without many negative side effects? And low risk/affordable, if possible?
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#2 JackChristopher

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 01:37 PM

Cinnamon and clove are good spices for that.
Metformin is a drug that does that.
Benfotiamine is a supplement that does it.

Ooh, here And these threads 1, 2.

Edited by JackChristopher, 10 November 2009 - 01:50 PM.

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#3 kismet

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 01:55 PM

Particularly well *and* no side-effects. None as of today.
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#4 curious_sle

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Posted 14 November 2009 - 11:02 AM

drinking yerba mate infusion seems to be the best option.
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#5 mustardseed41

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Posted 14 November 2009 - 09:36 PM

drinking yerba mate infusion seems to be the best option.


Why?
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#6 tintinet

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Posted 15 November 2009 - 12:22 AM

Fitoterapia. 2005 Jul ; 76(5): 419-27


Ilex paraguariensis extracts inhibit AGE formation more efficiently than green tea.

Glycation, the nonenzymatic adduct formation between sugar dicarbonyls and proteins, is one key molecular basis of diabetic complications due to hyperglycemia. Given the link between glycation and oxidation, we hypothesized that herbal extracts with a high concentration of antioxidant phenolics might possess significant in vitro antiglycation activities as well. The aim of the present study was to address the hypothesis that polyphenol-rich Ilex paraguariensis (IP) extracts are capable of inhibiting advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) formation and to compare the potency of these extracts with green tea and with the standard antiglycation agent aminoguanidine. When we studied the effects of IP extract on AGE fluorescence generated on bovine serum albumin (BSA) by glycation with methylglyoxal, a dose-dependent effect that reaches 40% at 20 mul/ml of extract was demonstrated. Green tea did not display any significant effect. IP polyphenols are about 2- to 2.5-fold higher in our preparations compared with green tea. The effect of IP, therefore, may be due not only to the higher concentrations but to the different composition in phenolics of the two botanical preparations as well. To better discriminate between an antioxidant or a carbonyl quenching mechanism of action, we explored tryptophan fluorescence and cross-linking by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel (SDS-PAGE) electrophoresis. The conformational changes induced by glycation and substitution of positive charges in arginine and/or lysine produce a decrease in tryptophan fluorescence. We show that incubation of BSA with methylglyoxal produces dramatic changes in tryptophan fluorescence that are prevented by aminoguanidine. This also prevents the downstream effect of AGE formation. Neither green tea nor IP extracts displayed any significant effect which rules out any significant participation as inhibitors in the first phase of the glycation cascade. The results from the SDS-PAGE serve to confirm the above-mentioned data. The effect is therefore due mainly to an inhibition of the second phase of the glycation reactions, namely the free-radical mediated conversion of the Amadori products to AGE. Taken together our results demonstrate a significant, dose-dependent effect of water extracts of I. paraguensis on AGE adducts formation on a protein model in vitro, whereas green tea displays no significant effect. The inhibition of AGE formation was comparable to that obtained by using millimolar concentrations of the standard antiglycation agent aminoguanidine.
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#7 JLL

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Posted 15 November 2009 - 12:54 PM

But yerba mate is carcinogenic, so it's not a good long-term option.
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#8 Pike

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Posted 15 November 2009 - 07:01 PM

wasn't yerba mate hepatotoxic or am i thinking of another herbal drink?
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#9 aikikai

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 09:16 AM

I am adding some more anti-glycation supplements here:

Alpha-Lipoc Acid
Vanadium
Chromium
Zinc
Taurine
Metformin (Glucophage)
Aminoguanidine
Beta-Alanine
Acetyl-L-Carnitine
Resveratrol
Vitamin C
Vitamin E
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#10 hamishm00

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 03:20 PM

p5p
pyridoxamine
Carnosine
alt-711
benfo

Those are your best bets at the moment, except alt-711 is difficult to find unless you order in bulk from China (as far as I know).
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#11 Lufega

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 05:14 PM

ginger 1
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#12 aikikai

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 09:17 PM

I forgot green tea:

Abstract

Diabetes leads to modification of collagen such as advanced glycation and cross-linking which play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus. We have investigated the effect of green tea on modification of collagen in streptozotocin (60 mg/kg body weight) induced diabetic rats. To investigate the therapeutic effect of green tea, treatment was begun six weeks after the onset of diabetes and green tea extract (300 mg/kg body weight) was given orally for 4 weeks. The collagen content, extent of advanced glycation, advanced glycation end products (AGE) and cross-linking of tail tendon collagen were investigated. Green tea reduced the tail tendon collagen content which increased in diabetic rats. Accelerated advanced glycation and AGE in diabetic animals, as detected by Ehrlich’s-positive material and collagen linked fluorescence respectively were reduced significantly by green tea. The solubility of tail tendon collagen decreased significantly in diabetic rats indicating a remarkable increase in the cross-linking, whereas green tea increases the solubility of collagen in diabetic rats. The present study reveals that green tea is effective in reducing the modification of tail tendon collagen in diabetic rats. Thus green tea may have a therapeutic effect in the treatment of glycation induced complications of diabetes.


http://www.sciencedi...b513a9715422d5c
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#13 1kgcoffee

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 09:58 PM

For anti-glycation, I take
p5p
b12 methylcobalamin (my diet is low in meat)
and loooooooots of tea
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#14 kismet

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 10:02 PM

b12 methylcobalamin (my diet is low in meat)

b12 plays a role? Interesting, anyone got refs?
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#15 Sillewater

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Posted 25 December 2009 - 12:58 AM

Probiotics might help too:

Antioxidative probiotic fermented goats' milk decreases oxidative stress-mediated atherogenicity in human subjects

Reactive Oxygen Species and Lipid Peroxidation Product-Scavenging Ability of Yogurt Organisms
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#16 VespeneGas

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Posted 26 December 2009 - 11:12 PM

Journal of Medicinal Food The Effect of Probiotic Dahi Containing Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus casei on Gastropathic Consequences in Diabetic Rats To cite this article:
Hariom Yadav, Shalini Jain, P.R. Sinha. Journal of Medicinal Food. March 2008, 11(1): 62-68. doi:10.1089/jmf.2006.136. Published in Volume: 11 Issue 1: March 24, 2008
Full Text: • PDF for printing (540.3 KB) • PDF w/ links (284.6 KB)

Hariom YadavAnimal Biochemistry Division, National Dairy Research Institute, Karnal, Haryana, IndiaShalini JainAnimal Biochemistry Division, National Dairy Research Institute, Karnal, Haryana, IndiaP.R. SinhaAnimal Biochemistry Division, National Dairy Research Institute, Karnal, Haryana, India ABSTRACT

In the present study, the effects of oral administration of probiotic dahi containing Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus casei on gastropathic consequences in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were evaluated, and effects were compared with skim milk- and control dahi-fed groups. The feeding of probiotic dahi did not change the blood glucose levels in chronic hyperglycemic conditions. The rate of charcoal transit was significantly higher in probiotic dahi-fed animals than in those of the diabetic control group (P < .05). Moreover, the oral administration of probiotic dahi significantly increased counts of lactobacilli adherent to epithelial walls and free in the lumen of the small and large intestine, while decreasing attached as well as free coliform counts (P < .05). In addition, probiotic dahi reversed the decrease in total lactobacilli and increase in total coliforms in fecal samples of diabetic animals. It was also shown that oral ingestion of probiotic dahi reduced the oxidative stress marker thiobarbituric acid-reactive species in intestinal tissues and glycosylation of hemoglobin (P < .05). All the effects were predominantly higher in the probiotic dahi-fed group than the skim milk- and control dahi-fed groups. The results indicate that probiotic dahi may be used as a therapeutic regimen to diminish the gastropathic consequences of diabetes.

http://www.lieberton...89/jmf.2006.136




@kismet: do you dispute the safety or the efficacy of pyridoxamine?
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#17 mikeinnaples

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Posted 28 December 2009 - 01:16 PM

I was never able to find a supplier of Aminoguanidine and Pyridoxamine.

Metformin and Benfotiamine for me at the moment is what I am using.
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#18 gwgaston

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Posted 28 December 2009 - 02:56 PM

I was never able to find a supplier of Aminoguanidine and Pyridoxamine.

Metformin and Benfotiamine for me at the moment is what I am using.



Last I looked LEF was still selling Pyridoxamine. They had stated they would likely have to stop... but it was still available on my last order:

http://www.lef.org/V...amine-Caps.html
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#19 pycnogenol

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Posted 28 December 2009 - 03:05 PM

I can't get anymore Pyridoxamine from iHerb. Discontinued.

http://www.iherb.com...Caps/14452?at=0

p-5-p, here I come.

Edited by pycnogenol, 28 December 2009 - 03:06 PM.

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#20 FNC

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Posted 29 December 2009 - 08:49 AM

Pyridoxamine is now classified as a drug due to one of its active ingredients, thus it is no longer available as a supplement.
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#21 s123

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Posted 29 December 2009 - 01:14 PM

Carnosine or its precursor beta-alanine (I take beta-alanine).

Metformin is probably a good choice because it has other life extension properties (activation of LKB-1 but also effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis).

Edited by s123, 29 December 2009 - 01:16 PM.

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#22 FNC

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Posted 30 December 2009 - 01:24 AM

Metformin is probably a good choice because it has other life extension properties (activation of LKB-1 but also effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis).


In Australia, Metformin is prescription only, is it the same on your side of the world?
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#23 gwgaston

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Posted 30 December 2009 - 02:27 AM

Pyridoxamine is now classified as a drug due to one of its active ingredients, thus it is no longer available as a supplement.


Yes, well Pyridoxamine is the active ingredient. ;-) But we know the FDA's position as it has been discussed here (it is not yet an approved drug BTW). Also can be read in this LEF article:

http://www.lef.org/m...doxamine_01.htm


But you can still find it until sold out at LEF. I got my last 2 bottles from them just a few weeks ago.

Edit:typos

Edited by frankbuzin, 30 December 2009 - 02:29 AM.

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#24 pycnogenol

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Posted 06 March 2010 - 03:01 PM

Pyridoxamine is now classified as a drug due to one of its active ingredients, thus it is no longer available as a supplement.


This company still has Pyridoxamine in their OTC Benfotiamine product:

http://www.iherb.com...sules/3549?at=0

Vitamin B6 (as Pyridoxamine)

Edited by pycnogenol, 06 March 2010 - 03:02 PM.

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#25 kenj

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Posted 06 March 2010 - 03:07 PM

Pyridoxamine is now classified as a drug due to one of its active ingredients, thus it is no longer available as a supplement.


Yes, well Pyridoxamine is the active ingredient. ;-) But we know the FDA's position as it has been discussed here (it is not yet an approved drug BTW). Also can be read in this LEF article:

http://www.lef.org/m...doxamine_01.htm


But you can still find it until sold out at LEF. I got my last 2 bottles from them just a few weeks ago.

Edit:typos


Frank,

when does yours expire? Thanks.
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#26 hamishm00

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Posted 06 March 2010 - 03:11 PM

I'm stocking up like crazy. LEF will eventually stop selling it when they run out.
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#27 sentrysnipe

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Posted 06 March 2010 - 07:33 PM

How does P-5-P stack against pyridoxamine? Is it better, worse, what is the difference in terms of AGE inhibition, bioavailability, etc.?
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#28 tadgh78

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Posted 06 March 2010 - 07:58 PM

How does P-5-P stack against pyridoxamine? Is it better, worse, what is the difference in terms of AGE inhibition, bioavailability, etc.?


P-5-P seems to be better than pyridoxamine at reducing lipid glycation, according to LEF.

Posted Image

This chart was prepared using data from the Journal of Lipid Research (Volume 47, 2006) in which differing compounds were screened for their ability to inhibit lipid glycation. As can be clearly seen, the RED bar shows far less lipid glycation in the presence of pyridoxal-5’-phosphate than any other form of vitamin B6, including pyridoxamine (black bar)


http://www.lef.org/m...doxamine_02.htm

Edited by tadgh78, 06 March 2010 - 08:00 PM.

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#29 N.T.M.

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Posted 07 March 2010 - 06:33 AM

I'm stocking up like crazy. LEF will eventually stop selling it when they run out.


What? SERIOUSLY?!?! :(

I was actually considering doing the same thing (prompted by an article I read).
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#30 niner

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Posted 07 March 2010 - 06:46 AM

How does P-5-P stack against pyridoxamine? Is it better, worse, what is the difference in terms of AGE inhibition, bioavailability, etc.?


P-5-P seems to be better than pyridoxamine at reducing lipid glycation, according to LEF.

Posted Image

This chart was prepared using data from the Journal of Lipid Research (Volume 47, 2006) in which differing compounds were screened for their ability to inhibit lipid glycation. As can be clearly seen, the RED bar shows far less lipid glycation in the presence of pyridoxal-5’-phosphate than any other form of vitamin B6, including pyridoxamine (black bar)


http://www.lef.org/m...doxamine_02.htm

Interesting graph. It says that all those compounds that were known to be pretty good glycation inhibitors are not much better than the control. That makes me wonder about the control... Is lipid glycation a very different problem than protein glycation? I wonder what the story is here.
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