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Magnesium Taurate


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#1 chrono

  • Location:New England

Posted 08 April 2010 - 07:22 AM


This is one of the most interesting forms of Magnesium. It is one of the only salts wherein the other compound (taurine) has its own significant benefits. It also seems to be harder to obtain, and somewhat less popular than other forms.

I'd like to collect information and experiences, so if you've taken it, please let us know your thoughts!


Some papers concerning cardioprotective properties, and migraine treatment:

Complementary vascular-protective actions of magnesium and taurine: a rationale for magnesium taurate.
McCarty MF.

By a variety of mechanisms, magnesium functions both intracellularly and extracellularly to minimize the cytoplasmic free calcium level, [Ca2+]i. This may be the chief reason why correction of magnesium deficiency, or induction of hypermagnesemia by parenteral infusion, exerts antihypertensive, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-arrhythmic and antithrombotic effects. Although the amino acid taurine can increase systolic calcium transients in cardiac cells (and thus has positive inotropic activity), it has other actions which tend to reduce [Ca2+]i. Indeed, in animal or clinical studies, taurine lowers elevated blood pressure, retards cholesterol-induced atherogenesis, prevents arrhythmias and stabilizes platelets--effects parallel to those of magnesium. The complex magnesium taurate may thus have considerable potential as a vascular-protective nutritional supplement, and might also be administered parenterally, as an alternative to magnesium sulfate, in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction as well as of pre-eclampsia. The effects of magnesium taurate in diabetes deserve particular attention, since both magnesium and taurine may improve insulin sensitivity, and also may lessen risk for the micro- and macrovascular complications of diabetes.

PMID: 8692051

Magnesium taurate for the prevention and treatment of pre-eclampsia/eclampsia.
McCarty MF.

The use of parenteral magnesium sulfate for the management of pre-eclampsia/eclampsia is well established. In striking analogy to the effects of hypermagnesemia, taurine has antivasospastic, antihypertensive, platelet-stabilizing, anticonvulsant and hypoxia-protective properties. Thus parenteral magnesium taurate can reasonably be proposed as a superior alternative to magnesium sulfate in the treatment of pre-eclampsia; administered orally as a component of prenatal supplementation, magnesium taurate might well have both preventive and therapeutic value in this syndrome. In the light of the hypoxia-protective actions of both magnesium and taurine, such supplementation might also protect fetuses experiencing temporary perinatal asphyxia, lessening the risk of cerebral palsy.

PMID: 8910874


Magnesium taurate and fish oil for prevention of migraine.
McCarty MF.

Although the pathogenesis of migraine is still poorly understood, various clinical investigations, as well as consideration of the characteristic activities of the wide range of drugs known to reduce migraine incidence, suggest that such phenomena as neuronal hyperexcitation, cortical spreading depression, vasospasm, platelet activation and sympathetic hyperactivity often play a part in this syndrome. Increased tissue levels of taurine, as well as increased extracellular magnesium, could be expected to dampen neuronal hyperexcitation, counteract vasospasm, increase tolerance to focal hypoxia and stabilize platelets; taurine may also lessen sympathetic outflow. Thus it is reasonable to speculate that supplemental magnesium taurate will have preventive value in the treatment of migraine. Fish oil, owing to its platelet-stabilizing and antivasospastic actions, may also be useful in this regard, as suggested by a few clinical reports. Although many drugs have value for migraine prophylaxis, the two nutritional measures suggested here may have particular merit owing to the versatility of their actions, their safety and lack of side-effects and their long-term favorable impact on vascular health.

PMID: 8961243

It's also mentioned here as effective in treatment for depression: Rapid recovery from major depression using magnesium treatment.
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#2 markymark Re: Magnesium Taurate

  • Location:Europe

Posted 08 April 2010 - 07:34 AM

thx for staring this thread chrono,

I also wondered for long time why Mgnesium taurate did not make it to become a top-level ingredient, both as stand-alone and also part of a multi-formula ...
lack of studies as excuse...? hm
The industry was just fine with sales of their Mg-aminoacid chelates (and pseudo-chelates) and even with low quality the Mg-oxide...and maybe Mg-taurate is just too expensive for them....
'hope somebody has a clue.
If I find something, I'll post it here
MM

PS: What I found always interesting, were the positive effects of taurine on alcohol fed rats (see pub med)

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#3 chrono Re: Magnesium Taurate

  • Location:New England

Posted 08 April 2010 - 07:58 AM

My own experience:

Obtained a 1kg bag from Vitaspace for $42 shipped (4.2¢/g, 18.8¢/400mg elemental Mg). Has the consistency of flour, and is only very slightly bitter. Mg taurate contains 8.9% elemental magnesium by weight, so 400mg Mg is contained in 4494mg of total powder. I found a level teaspoon to average out to about 4g, and a 00 cap to hold just under 1g of highly compressed material.

I started with ¼ tsp (about 90mg Mg) nightly, and titrated upward by ¼ tsp. It is insoluble in water, so I scoop ¼ tsp onto my tongue at a time and swallow with juice or milk (completely masks the flavor, though you have to be careful not to move it around in your mouth, and swallow carefully).

I take my dose a few hours before I intend to go to sleep. I notice a rather pleasant, natural-feeling tiredness after maybe an hour. I'm a borderline insomniac, and usually have trouble feeling tired at a normal time, so this is quite beneficial to me. It makes it harder to perform complex mental tasks, but I can certainly remain awake if I want. I feel like my sleep is deeper, with perhaps a slight decrease in dream occurrence and intensity.

One side effect I've noticed is some tiredness in the morning, which increased markedly with each higher dose. I feel much groggier upon waking, and it feels very nice to sleep in another hour or two. Setting my alarm a few hours early and then setting it for the normal time seems to help. Upon getting up, the grogginess dissipates rapidly, though there is some somnolence for a few hours if I don't take my morning dose of 500mg ALCAR.

This effect decreases after several days at each dose, but at 3g it's lingered for about a week. Also at this dose, some effects have remained throughout the day: increased "spaciness," decreased performance in some complex cognitive tasks, even with piracetam and ALCAR (for example, more difficulty expressing myself eloquently, something piracetam + ALCAR usually improves tremendously), and some very noticeable trouble with mid- to long-term memory recall (but not really working memory). I'm very interested to hear if anyone else has had similar problems, or knows if taurine on its own can produce such effects at these moderate dosages? I've dropped back down to 2g as a test, and because it was interfering with my thinking pretty noticeably. If these do continue indefinitely, I'll probably take 1g of Mg taurate and get the rest of my magnesium from malate or glycinate.

If someone was hoping to treat anxiety, though, I can picture this being tremendously helpful. On the plus side, I've noticed mood support similar to Mg citrate I took for about a month this winter. Much brighter generally: I feel more excited by certain things more easily, and am even calmer than usual. I don't feel quite as "lost" in the mornings (apart from the somnolence, my mood is better). Also, there is absolutely none of the GI trouble (mainly loose stool) which prompted me to stop the citrate.

All in all, I like a lot of the effects and I think it's very promising. I would greatly appreciate hearing others' experiences with regard to sedation and cognitive disruption, and how these things played out when tapering.

Edited by chrono, 08 April 2010 - 08:01 AM.


#4 FunkOdyssey Re: Magnesium Taurate

  • Location:Manchester, CT USA

Posted 08 April 2010 - 03:10 PM

I think the main problem with magnesium taurate (or taurinate as its sometimes called) is that its more expensive than the sum of its parts: a combination of equivalent doses magnesium salt and taurine. That makes it a very difficult sell.

#5 chrono Re: Magnesium Taurate

  • Location:New England

Posted 15 April 2010 - 05:49 PM

I'm not sure about that. My bulk price for taurate was 46¢/g, while from BAC you can get Mg malate for 33¢/g, glycinate for 49¢/g, and orotate for $1.70/g (elemental Mg grams, equal s&h included). Mg taurate gives you 10g taurine for every 1g magnesium, so add 22¢ to those prices. It seems it's cheaper than its constituent chemicals if you want to shell out $42.

The other obvious question is whether it would have the same benefits if the magnesium and taurine aren't molecularly bonded. The wording of the first abstract leads me to guess it would, but I'll take a look at the full text when I can.

My tentative plan is to purchase some magnesium malate, and adjust the combination so I'm only getting 1g of taurine with 400mg magnesium. BAC is the only place I've found the "better" forms of magnesium as bulk powder; if anyone knows of any other sources, please let me know.

I'm still not sure about the cognitive impairment I mentioned. I reduced my dose from 3g to 2g, and felt like they lessened noticeably, but are still present. I may temporarily stop it all together and see if I notice a drastic improvement. I'm also sleeping poorly at the moment due to some chronic back trouble, so I can't be entirely sure of the cause.

Can anyone tell me if they notice anything like my cognition/recall effects from taurine alone?

Edited by chrono, 15 April 2010 - 06:20 PM.


#6 rwac Re: Magnesium Taurate

  • Location:Dimension X
  • yes

Posted 15 April 2010 - 06:39 PM

I used to take 375mg of Mg from taurate a while ago. It helped me a lot with sleep, the downside was that I was somnolent(thanks for the word!) when I woke up, my experience mirrors yours.

Perhaps I was deficient in taurine because I was a vegetarian at the time.

This effect disappeared after a bit, and later, I didn't actually notice anything when I switched over to Mg Malate+ taurine, and I haven't taken taurine in a while.

Edited by rwac, 15 April 2010 - 06:41 PM.


#7 chrono Re: Magnesium Taurate

  • Location:New England

Posted 13 July 2010 - 07:05 AM

I retrieved the three Medical Hypotheses papers by McCarty. As implied by the journal title, these papers theorize about the utility of Mg taurate to treat different conditions. The first paper is the most relevant, and spends a lot of time discussing the various benefits of magnesium and taurine separately (there isn't much here on taurine, so if anyone wants me to paste the writeup and references, I will). Basically, his rationale is the same one proposed in some of the older discussions here:

Since the counteranion in these soluble magnesium complexes represents approximately 90% of the weight of the complex, it would be advantageous to use a counteranion which itself has nutritional utility, and which, if feasible, complements the vascular-protective actions of magnesium. I suggest that the amino acid taurine may satisfy these criteria.

Though in answer to one of my original questions, there is no proposed benefit to this compound over taking the equivalent amounts of magnesium and taurine separately.

Also some general information about the chemical:

This complex has been described once before in the chemical literature - as an intermediate in the synthesis of benzylidene derivatives. More recent studies indicate that magnesium taurate occurs both as a salt and as a complex (Sanchez R, Zielinski J, personal communication). The salt is rapidly water soluble; the complex, although insoluble, rapidly breaks down to yield dissolved magnesium ions and free taurine when added to water that is even slightly acidic. Furthermore, the complex appears to be in equilibrium with the salt, such that, when added to water at neutral or alkaline pH, the complex will gradually yield free dissolved ions. Thus, it can be anticipated that either the salt or complex will have good nutritional availability when administered orally, even if gastric acidity is suboptimal.

I'm currently taking about a gram of this a night (in a 00 capsule), yielding about 89mg magnesium. No cognitive interference the next day. I haven't gone any higher than this again, though I suspect my previous trouble may have been due to something different, or perhaps from missing some of my doses. I'm also taking 120/5mg lithium orotate at night now, so I don't particularly need any more sedating substances. I'd like to up my dose of magnesium, but I think I'm going to supplement additionally with magnesium malate.

All in all, I haven't decided yet if it's worth ordering another batch of this once my current kg runs out.

#8 Mishael Re: Magnesium Taurate

Posted 05 August 2010 - 02:26 PM

Do you think it is affecting your electrolyte balance and/or also your adrenals? Have you read the thread "Piracetam non-responders Responders are welcome too" by John W.

I have been taking Mag. Glycinate. It definitely brightened my mood. I also noticed that it made me feel the physical sensation of my heart beating. Last night after reading through said thread I took 1/4 teaspoon of salt with water and it caused my sensation of my heart beating to stop and gave me a good night sleep. So, I believe magnesium influences electrolytes particularly sodium.

#9 chrono Re: Magnesium Taurate

  • Location:New England

Posted 05 August 2010 - 07:44 PM

^^Interesting. I read that thread long ago, but missed that particular point. I've never noticed any kind of effect like those.

I'm up to 2g/day (~180mg Mg), with no problem the next day. I'm beginning to think that my original problem was something else related to my pain condition and/or insomnia, which can happen sometimes. I'm thinking about upping my dose a little more.

#10 pycnogenol Re: Magnesium Taurate

  • Location:In a van down by the river!

Posted 05 August 2010 - 10:19 PM

I'll have to give Magnesium Taurate a try the next time I place an iHerb order; right now I'm taking Magnesium Glycinate 200 mg twice per day.

Durk Pearson & Sandy Shaw quote about Magnesium:

"Magnesium deficiency is very common in our society. The RDA used to be 800 mg, but practically no one was getting that much from the food supply.
And because many entitlement programs, such as Food Stamps, require that RDA amounts be obtained from food rather than from supplements, the FDA
realized that giving people enough food to provide 800 mg/day of magnesium was prohibitively expensive. So they reduced the RDA to 400 mg—a triumph
of politics over science!
"

BTW, both Durk and Sandy take Magnesium Aspartate.

Edited by pycnogenol, 05 August 2010 - 10:19 PM.


#11 Mishael Re: Magnesium Taurate

Posted 06 August 2010 - 04:24 PM

Overdosing on magnesium is an interesting question. My personal feeling is that once your body has what it needs there is no sense in putting more in. One can overdose on water so I am sure you can on magnesium. For me 600mg a day is plenty, even 200mg of magnesium glycinate per day will give good effect. I can only speak for myself of course.

Pycnogenol, what did you notice from the glycinate mag?

Edited by Mishael, 06 August 2010 - 04:25 PM.


#12 pycnogenol Re: Magnesium Taurate

  • Location:In a van down by the river!

Posted 06 August 2010 - 04:29 PM

Pycnogenol, what did you notice from the glycinate mag?


I've noticed better glucose control from taking the glycinate plus it has fewer side effects than the citrate.

Edited by pycnogenol, 06 August 2010 - 04:30 PM.


#13 Mishael Re: Magnesium Taurate

Posted 06 August 2010 - 05:16 PM


Pycnogenol, what did you notice from the glycinate mag?


I've noticed better glucose control from taking the glycinate plus it has fewer side effects than the citrate.


What does that mean, "better glucose control"? You have diabetes so it is helping you with that?

#14 pycnogenol Re: Magnesium Taurate

  • Location:In a van down by the river!

Posted 06 August 2010 - 06:00 PM



Pycnogenol, what did you notice from the glycinate mag?


I've noticed better glucose control from taking the glycinate plus it has fewer side effects than the citrate.


What does that mean, "better glucose control"? You have diabetes so it is helping you with that?


Better glucose control meaning lower glucose meter readings and tighter A1c endpoints.

I have a family history of Type 2 but do not take any prescription medications - just a careful
diet, daily exercise, weight management, regular blood glucose draws and some key supplements.

Edited by pycnogenol, 06 August 2010 - 06:00 PM.


#15 nito Re: Magnesium Taurate

Posted 07 August 2010 - 02:22 AM

I thought magnesium malate was the best. Does that mean i need to get this one too for mu depression and anxiety? damn!

#16 niner Re: Magnesium Taurate

  • Location:Philadelphia

Posted 07 August 2010 - 05:37 AM

I thought magnesium malate was the best. Does that mean i need to get this one too for mu depression and anxiety? damn!

No, I don't think so. There's not that much difference in the bioavailability of different forms of magnesium. Even the humble (and cheap and convenient) oxide is pretty good at correcting frank deficiency. (It appears that it might be less good at pushing up the size of your magnesium pool when you are starting at normal levels.)

#17 Mishael Re: Magnesium Taurate

Posted 11 August 2010 - 08:20 PM

Do you think it is affecting your electrolyte balance and/or also your adrenals? Have you read the thread "Piracetam non-responders Responders are welcome too" by John W.

I have been taking Mag. Glycinate. It definitely brightened my mood. I also noticed that it made me feel the physical sensation of my heart beating. Last night after reading through said thread I took 1/4 teaspoon of salt with water and it caused my sensation of my heart beating to stop and gave me a good night sleep. So, I believe magnesium influences electrolytes particularly sodium.


I am beginning to get to the bottom of this. "Taurine Role in Cardiology and Cardiac Arrhythmias" http://george-eby-re...ml/taurine.html and http://george-eby-re...arrhythmias.pdf

Apparently, taurine and arginine are believed to regulate things like Mg, K, Na, Ca. If you have heart arrythmias this will help it significantly and also improve energy. For a healthy heart you need both taurine and arginine.

I think suplementing with Mg. without these may not be sufficient.

The best combo is Mg. glycinate w/ separate taurine and arginine. This is an effective treatment for depression and having a healthy heart according to http://george-eby-re...on-anxiety.html

Edited by Mishael, 11 August 2010 - 09:03 PM.


#18 Mishael Re: Magnesium Taurate

Posted 15 August 2010 - 11:30 PM

This man has literally written hundreds of thousands of words. I unfortunately have not read them all. He mentions that there have been studies on the effects of electrolytes and mental health but that as of this writting this is enigmatic and difficult. I believe in magnesium very strongly and its need in the diet. But every time I take around 600mg I feel my heart beating which kind of disturbs me. So, this guy, George Eby, recommends besides magnesium taurine and arginine and a perfect intake of iodine and he also mentions indole-3-carbinol, found in cruciferous vegetables for the purpose of magnesium absorption, I don't think that was a problem for me. I am going to try drinking more water.

#19 chrono Re: Magnesium Taurate

  • Location:New England

Posted 16 August 2010 - 05:16 AM

Moved some posts about lithium orotate to the most recent LiOr thread.

If you're interested in the cardioprotective effects of taurine, here are the salient review sections from the main Med Hypotheses paper above:

Cardiac actions of taurine
The effects of taurine on the heart are fascinating but confusing. As we shall see, many of the effects of taurine and magnesium on cardiovascular and platelet function are parallel and possibly complementary, and presumably indicative of improved control of [Ca2÷]i. However, taurine exerts a positive inotropic effect on heart function that is quite distinct from the actions of magnesium, and in fact involves an amplification of systolic calcium transients. Taurine enhances the sensitivity of calcium-activated calcium channels in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, resulting in a more vigorous release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum during the systolic action potential (76,77). However, the membrane effects of taurine also promote the activity of transport enzymes - notably the sarcolemma Ca-ATPase and Na/Ca-countertransporter (69,77,78)- which remove calcium from the cytoplasm during diastole, promoting rapid diastolic relaxation. In effect, taurine enables the calcium signal for contraction to snap on and snap off quite vigorously, resulting in efficient pump function. Taurine also somehow enhances the sensitivity of cardiac myofilaments to calcium, such that a slightly lower [Ca2÷] i is required to achieve a given degree of force generation (79); the maximal calcium-activated force generation is not altered.

Beta-adrenergic stimulation of the heart increases cardiac taurine transport through a cAMP-mediated mechanism (80). Thus, intracellular cardiac taurine levels are regulated to modulate inotropic activity. Not surprisingly, cardiac taurine levels are elevated in congestive failure (81); however, taurine administration elevates these levels further and promotes a greater inotropic effect. In oral doses ranging from 3 to 6 g daily, taurine has been shown to improve cardiac efficiency in congestive heart failure (82-84); confirmatory data is provided by a rabbit model of congestive failure (85). Unlike positive inotropes which inhibit the sodium pump or elevate cAMP levels, taurine does not increase arrhythmic risk or the heart rate. Indeed, parenteral pre-administration of taurine in animals has been reported to reduce their sensitivity to a range of arrhythmia-inducing stimuli (86-88); in this respect, taurine's action is parallel to that of hypermagnesemia. These considerations are of some importance, as there is fear that traditional inotropic therapy of congestive failure may sometimes actually increase mortality owing to greater cardiac oxygen demand and an increased incidence of arrhythmias (89).

As noted briefly above, taurine has a membrane-stabilizing antioxidant activity. Although taurine has little value as a free radical quencher, it nevertheless protects membrane lipids from peroxidative damage, presumably because of a steric effect on membrane structure (67). This may explain the observation that taurine perfusion (1-20 mM) protects guinea-pig hearts from reperfusion injury after 30 min of hypoxia; the taurine treatment decreased ventricular arrhythmias, enhanced recovery of electrical and mechanical function, reduced calcium overload and decreased LDH release (90). (The ability of taurine to protect the heart from calcium overload has been demonstrated in other experimental models as welt (77).) More recently, intravenous infusion of taurine (5 g) prior to coronary artery bypass surgery reduced the peroxidative damage to cardiac membranes (as assessed by chemiluminescence) measured after 10 rain of reperfusion; the structural integrity of cardiac mitochondria was also protected by the taurine infusion (91). The membrane-stabilizing action of taurine is complemented by its ability to nucleophilically cleave hypochlorite, an inflammatory mediator released by activated macrophages (92); this suggests anti-inflammatory potential for taurine.
[...]

Taurine and vascular smooth muscle
I am able to find only two studies which address the direct effects of taurine on vascular smooth muscle function. Recently, French researchers, working with perfused aortic rings from rats, noted that taurine perfusion (1-10 mM) reduced basal tone and had a relaxant effect on rings preconstricted with KC1 or norepinephrine (98). This effect was not mediated by endothelium or by muscarinic or adrenoreceptors, and thus probably represented a direct effect of taurine on vascular smooth muscle cells. Although this study did not define the mechanism of taurine's vasorelaxant action, the authors suggest that taurine may be minimizing [Ca2*]i by enhancing the activity of calcium-transporting enzymes. This suggestion is credible in light of evidence that taurine stimulates Ca-ATPase and Na/Ca-countertransport in cardiac sarcolemma. In a previous study, taurine perfusion was shown to relax KCl-preconstricted rabbit ear arteries, but did not significantly influence the tonic phase of norepinephrine-mediated contraction (99). Since KCl-mediated contraction (but not that induced by norepinephrine) results from calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels, these data suggest that taurine may reduce the open-probability of these channels, much like calcium channel-blocker drugs. In cardiac myocytes, taurine inhibits the rise in [Ca2÷]i induced by tx-agonists (100); it would be of interest to determine whether taurine has an analogous effect on Gq-linked receptors mediating vasoconstriction in vascular tissue. Clearly, more work is required to define the impact of taurine on calcium transport mechanisms in vascular smooth muscle; in any case, the net effect of these actions appears to be a reduction of [Ca2÷]i .

These findings cast some light on the ability of dietary taurine to prevent or delay the onset of hypertension in various rat models of this disease; the benefit ranges from modest to substantial, depending on the model examined (100-104). There are also several reports from Japanese clinicians, dating as far back as 1967 (105), that chronic oral administration of taurine reduces elevated blood pressures. In one such study, eight essential hypertensives received 6 g/day of taurine orally for 6 weeks; initial average blood pressure of 174/103 fell to 148/91, with a drop in mean blood pressure of 19 mmHg (106). These authors also reported that urinary taurine excretion was markedly subnormal in untreated hypertensives. In a later controlled study enrolling young subjects whose systolic pressure was slightly elevated, systolic and diastolic readings fell significantly by 9/4 mmHg, respectively, after 1 week of 6 g taurine/day; no change was noted in those receiving placebo (107). In general, the authors of reports demonstrating taurine's antihypertensive activity have suggested hormonal modulation - in particular, suppression of sympathetic activity - as its mode of action; while such effects might indeed play a part, the data cited above suggest that taurine is also directly influencing the responsiveness of vascular smooth muscle to vasoconstrictor agonists.


Edited by chrono, 16 August 2010 - 05:20 AM.
formatting


#20 Mishael Re: Magnesium Taurate

Posted 19 August 2010 - 08:20 AM

Tried taurine. It helped with the heart beat sensation thing.

#21 outsider Re: Magnesium Taurate

Posted 02 September 2010 - 09:45 AM

Very interesting thread, I just discovered the great importance of Magnesium/calcium balance in the diet which is unbalanced in occident.

I got interested in magnesium after some bad experiment with vit D which revealed mag deficiency in my case. I had developed a bump in my throat after some vit D and it really was a pain, because I was losing speech fluency and then discovered that the bump was a mag deficiency. Wow. I got some mag and the problem is now gone.

After much reading I now believe calcium/magnesium ratio should be 1/1.

Right now I'm supplementing with mag chloride.

#22 Deckah Re: Magnesium Taurate

  • Location:Oklahoma

Posted 04 September 2010 - 03:59 AM

Have a question in regards to Magnesium Taurate. I have been reading the forums for a while for a good form of Magnesium to help with Anxiety, my anxiety is more social, but I am deficient in Magnesium. Maybe it's my problem, but it's a start.


I know most RDA's are skewed and not revised, but say I needed 1g a day with a similar amount of calcium. Does this(RDA's) relate to Elemental Magnesium or just Magnesium in general? Either way I'm going to sip and log, then change increments until I get it proper.

#23 outsider Re: Magnesium Taurate

Posted 04 September 2010 - 08:36 AM

Have a question in regards to Magnesium Taurate. I have been reading the forums for a while for a good form of Magnesium to help with Anxiety, my anxiety is more social, but I am deficient in Magnesium. Maybe it's my problem, but it's a start.


I know most RDA's are skewed and not revised, but say I needed 1g a day with a similar amount of calcium. Does this(RDA's) relate to Elemental Magnesium or just Magnesium in general? Either way I'm going to sip and log, then change increments until I get it proper.



I think the world health organisation recommend around 500mg elemental calcium. RDI of 1000mg calcium seems more based on business than your health. So a ratio of 1/1 500mg magnesium 500mg calcium looks good in my book.

#24 ajnast4r Re: Magnesium Taurate

  • Location:Sacramento, California

Posted 06 September 2010 - 06:23 PM

I know most RDA's are skewed and not revised


the RDA/DRI's were the most recently revised of all the recommendations.


I think the world health organisation recommend around 500mg elemental calcium.


http://whqlibdoc.who.../9241546123.pdf

800

Current calcium intake recommendations (mg/day)
United European Canada and
Australia Kingdom Union United States
Group 1991a 1991b 1993c 1997d
Pregnancy (last trimester) 1100 700 700 1000–1300
Lactation 1200 1250 1200 1000–1300
Infancy 300 (human milk) 525 400 210–270
500 (cow milk)
Childhood 530–800 350–550 400–550 500–800
Puberty and adolescence
Boys 1000–1200 1000 1000 1300
Girls 800–1000 800 800 1300
Maturity
Males 800 700 700 1000
Females 800 700 700 1000
Later life
Males >65 years 800 700 700 1200
Postmenopausal women 1000 700 700 1200

#25 Iceebear19727 Re: Magnesium Taurate

  • Location:Lawton, OK

Posted 30 September 2011 - 11:27 PM

I know this is a dead thread, but does anyone know how effect MgTaurate is for preventing/reversing amphetamine tolerance compared to the other Mg forms?

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#26 chrono Re: Magnesium Taurate

  • Location:New England

Posted 05 October 2011 - 04:31 PM

I know this is a dead thread, but does anyone know how effect MgTaurate is for preventing/reversing amphetamine tolerance compared to the other Mg forms?


There isn't much hard data available on magnesium taurate, but the few papers suggested that it behaves the same as other forms of magnesium once in the body. That is, there really wouldn't be much difference for any application.

Taurine itself will probably have a dampening effect on amphetamine, though...which could mean the benefits or the side effects.




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