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Naringenin, like Resveratorl activates the SIRT1


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#1 peteo

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Posted 21 June 2010 - 02:32 PM


http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/20558145

Naringenin, a flavonoid found in high concentrations in grapefruit, has been reported to have antioxidant, antiatherogenic, and anticancer effects. Effects on lipid and glucose metabolism have also been reported. Naringenin is structurally similar to the polyphenol resveratrol, that has been reported to activate the SIRT1 protein deacetylase and to have antidiabetic properties. In the present study we examined the direct effects of naringenin on skeletal muscle glucose uptake and investigated the mechanism involved. Naringenin stimulated glucose uptake in L6 myotubes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Maximum stimulation was seen with 75 muM naringenin for 2 hours (192.8+/-24%, p<0.01), a response comparable to maximum insulin response (190.1+/-13%, p<0.001). Similar to insulin, naringenin did not increase glucose uptake in myoblasts indicating that GLUT4 glucose transporters may be involved in the naringenin-stimulated glucose uptake. In addition, naringenin did not have a significant effect on basal or insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation while significantly increased AMPK phosphorylation/activation. Furthermore, silencing of AMPK, using siRNA approach, abolished the naringenin-stimulated glucose uptake. The SIRT1 inhibitors nicotinamide and EX527 did not have an effect on naringenin-stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and glucose uptake. Our data show that naringenin increases glucose uptake by skeletal muscle cells in an AMPK-dependent manner. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

#2 maxwatt

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Posted 21 June 2010 - 10:51 PM

Naringenin has an inhibitory effect on the human cytochrome P450 isoform CYP1A2, which can change pharmacokinetics of many drugs. Doctors usually ask their patients not to drink or eat grapefruit (juice) when taking certainmedications.

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#3 tunt01

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Posted 21 June 2010 - 10:58 PM

oooh, very interesting. must explain why higher amounts of it in certain citrus foods show better blood sugar control. thanks.

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#4 bixbyte

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Posted 22 June 2010 - 06:31 AM

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20558145

Naringenin, a flavonoid found in high concentrations in grapefruit, has been reported to have antioxidant, antiatherogenic, and anticancer effects. Effects on lipid and glucose metabolism have also been reported. Naringenin is structurally similar to the polyphenol resveratrol, that has been reported to activate the SIRT1 protein deacetylase and to have antidiabetic properties. In the present study we examined the direct effects of naringenin on skeletal muscle glucose uptake and investigated the mechanism involved. Naringenin stimulated glucose uptake in L6 myotubes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Maximum stimulation was seen with 75 muM naringenin for 2 hours (192.8+/-24%, p<0.01), a response comparable to maximum insulin response (190.1+/-13%, p<0.001). Similar to insulin, naringenin did not increase glucose uptake in myoblasts indicating that GLUT4 glucose transporters may be involved in the naringenin-stimulated glucose uptake. In addition, naringenin did not have a significant effect on basal or insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation while significantly increased AMPK phosphorylation/activation. Furthermore, silencing of AMPK, using siRNA approach, abolished the naringenin-stimulated glucose uptake. The SIRT1 inhibitors nicotinamide and EX527 did not have an effect on naringenin-stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and glucose uptake. Our data show that naringenin increases glucose uptake by skeletal muscle cells in an AMPK-dependent manner. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.


__________________________________

YES, one Glass of Grapefruit Juice after my morning RES everyday for 3 years.

I think, the cheap bitter tasting econo brands of GFJ have a higher naringenin concentration.

The capsule form is too expensive, Glass of Juice is less money.

Plus a Capsule of Bioperine, EGCG, and Polydatin have a synergistic effect.

I am testing one new supplement to help try to increase my Plasma levels of RES.

Swansom has this formula called Digestitol that costs less than plain Bioperine and
contains 5 MG of bioperine plus 4 flavones.

I'll feel if that hits the RES spot?
I'm testing.

#5 mikeinnaples

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Posted 22 June 2010 - 11:44 AM

You have to be VERY careful with this stuff (and Bioperine as well) if you are taking other supplements or medication.
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#6 bixbyte

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Posted 22 June 2010 - 07:47 PM

You have to be VERY careful with this stuff (and Bioperine as well) if you are taking other supplements or medication.


Yes Careful if you are taking Heart Medication in the AM.
People that are on Heart Med take RES?

Grapefruit Juice is just an easy way to slow your Liver Down and increase RES Plasma Levels.

#7 mikeinnaples

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Posted 23 June 2010 - 11:54 AM

You have to be VERY careful with this stuff (and Bioperine as well) if you are taking other supplements or medication.


Yes Careful if you are taking Heart Medication in the AM.
People that are on Heart Med take RES?

Grapefruit Juice is just an easy way to slow your Liver Down and increase RES Plasma Levels.


Does Naringenin inhibit CYP3A4 and CYP1A2 like Naringin or just CYP1A2? I don't think it does, but I am not an expert on the molecule by any means.

Regardless Bioperine ...and please correct me if I am wrong, inhibits CYP3A4 anyways, and that opens up a huge can of worms if you are taking other supplements / medication.

Just saying, to be careful with the stuff. I take bioperine myself with my curcumin, but I take it away from everything else.
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#8 bixbyte

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Posted 26 June 2010 - 02:09 PM

__________

YES, one Glass of Grapefruit Juice after my morning RES everyday for 3 years.

I think, the cheap bitter tasting econo brands of GFJ have a higher naringenin concentration.

The capsule form is too expensive, Glass of Juice is less money.

Plus a Capsule of Bioperine, EGCG, and Polydatin have a synergistic effect.

I am testing one new supplement to help try to increase my Plasma levels of RES.

Swanson has this formula called Digestitol that costs less than plain Bioperine and
contains 5 MG of bioperine plus 4 flavones.


I'll feel if that hits the RES spot?
I'm testing.



This product does feel like it enhances the properties Resveratrol.
There are over 20 people at the swanson dot com site that rate Digestitol highly as a supplement enhancer.
positive,
I notice the difference, Hits the spot with RES, Makes the brain connections so I can get the words out much better.
neg,
BUT, Swanson raised the price. I paid $2.69 and now they are charging $4.49 for 60 caps.

NOTE:
Contains 5 MG of Cerecalase this product is also bundled in Mercury Magnet a Mercury Posion detox product where I found the following info:


www.mercury-poison.com/mercury_magnets.html

CereCalase is a special proprietary enzymatic formula that helps the release of fiber-bound nutrients.

....

CereCalase is an exclusive mixture of 3 specific enzymes, Phytase, Hemicellulase, Beta-glucanase, which are naturally contained in certain types of mushrooms, and which work together to macerate, or disrupt, the cell wall of herbs, vegetables and fruit. These enzymes hydrolyse non-starch polysaccharides (NSP), the anti-nutritive factor in food fiber which inhibit the action of digestive enzymes thus preventing mineral absorption.

Edited by bixbyte, 26 June 2010 - 02:27 PM.





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