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Egg Cholestrol Myth


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13 replies to this topic

#1 stablemind

Posted 06 January 2011 - 03:21 AM


Is it true egg cholestrol doesn't raise our cholestrol levels? Would it be safe to eat 9 eggs per day as a healthy 20 y/o, genetically predisposed to high Cholesterol levels?
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#2 capsun Re: Egg Cholestrol Myth

  • Location:Arizona

Posted 06 January 2011 - 04:07 AM

Eggs are full of methionine. That alone is enough to be atherogenic. They are low in carbohydrate and do contain an abundant amount of other nutrients as well (such as choline), but do to the excessive methionine and IGF-1 production, I don't think I would consider them anti-aging.

Edited by capsun, 06 January 2011 - 04:08 AM.

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#3 TheFountain Re: Egg Cholestrol Myth

Posted 06 January 2011 - 06:44 AM

Eggs are full of methionine. That alone is enough to be atherogenic. They are low in carbohydrate and do contain an abundant amount of other nutrients as well (such as choline), but do to the excessive methionine and IGF-1 production, I don't think I would consider them anti-aging.


So that would apply to people who eat alot of meat then too, right? Since meat is fairly high in methionine. As high as eggs in some cases.

Edited by TheFountain, 06 January 2011 - 07:05 AM.

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#4 stablemind Re: Egg Cholestrol Myth

Posted 06 January 2011 - 06:53 AM

Eggs are full of methionine. That alone is enough to be atherogenic. They are low in carbohydrate and do contain an abundant amount of other nutrients as well (such as choline), but do to the excessive methionine and IGF-1 production, I don't think I would consider them anti-aging.


I dont mind if its not anti-aging, but it can't cause harm right? Im trying to bulk.
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#5 capsun Re: Egg Cholestrol Myth

  • Location:Arizona

Posted 06 January 2011 - 07:17 AM


Eggs are full of methionine. That alone is enough to be atherogenic. They are low in carbohydrate and do contain an abundant amount of other nutrients as well (such as choline), but do to the excessive methionine and IGF-1 production, I don't think I would consider them anti-aging.


So that would apply to people who eat alot of eat then too, right? Since meat is fairly high in methionine. As high as eggs in some cases.


Apparently. Though again, completely excluding meat from the diet might not be a good idea if there are nutrients in meat we don't know about that can't be supplemented. I know that issue has been discussed here before. As far as methionine causing coronary artery disease, the animal studies have been found in at least one study to correlate to humans as well:

adjusting for age, examination years, BMI, urinary nicotine metabolites
and protein intake (excluding methionine), the relative risks of acute
coronary event in the three highest quarters of dietary methionine
intake were 1.31 (95% CI: 0.92, 1.86) [for an intake of 1.7- 2 g Met/d],
1.31 (95% CI: 0.88, 1.96) [2-2.6 g Met/d], and 2.08 (95% CI: 1.31, 3.29)
[> 2.6 g Met/d] as compared with the lowest quarter [<1.7 g Met/d]."


I don't know if there's any reason to not believe that an even lower intake of methionine might drive the risk down further. Further studies are needed.

I dont mind if its not anti-aging, but it can't cause harm right? Im trying to bulk.


Eggs are awesome for bulking since they are high in methionine and increase IGF-1, but they might speed up the aging process. If you're in your 20s, you probably won't notice it.

Check out this guy. He's 72 years old and maintains his physique on a diet consisting of only nuts, beans, fruits and vegetables...



Not bad.

Edited by capsun, 06 January 2011 - 07:20 AM.

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#6 stablemind Re: Egg Cholestrol Myth

Posted 06 January 2011 - 07:45 AM



Eggs are full of methionine. That alone is enough to be atherogenic. They are low in carbohydrate and do contain an abundant amount of other nutrients as well (such as choline), but do to the excessive methionine and IGF-1 production, I don't think I would consider them anti-aging.


So that would apply to people who eat alot of eat then too, right? Since meat is fairly high in methionine. As high as eggs in some cases.


Apparently. Though again, completely excluding meat from the diet might not be a good idea if there are nutrients in meat we don't know about that can't be supplemented. I know that issue has been discussed here before. As far as methionine causing coronary artery disease, the animal studies have been found in at least one study to correlate to humans as well:

adjusting for age, examination years, BMI, urinary nicotine metabolites
and protein intake (excluding methionine), the relative risks of acute
coronary event in the three highest quarters of dietary methionine
intake were 1.31 (95% CI: 0.92, 1.86) [for an intake of 1.7- 2 g Met/d],
1.31 (95% CI: 0.88, 1.96) [2-2.6 g Met/d], and 2.08 (95% CI: 1.31, 3.29)
[> 2.6 g Met/d] as compared with the lowest quarter [<1.7 g Met/d]."


I don't know if there's any reason to not believe that an even lower intake of methionine might drive the risk down further. Further studies are needed.

I dont mind if its not anti-aging, but it can't cause harm right? Im trying to bulk.


Eggs are awesome for bulking since they are high in methionine and increase IGF-1, but they might speed up the aging process. If you're in your 20s, you probably won't notice it.

Check out this guy. He's 72 years old and maintains his physique on a diet consisting of only nuts, beans, fruits and vegetables...



Not bad.


hes black...

but seriously though, nuts are great for bulking also.
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#7 Ghostrider Re: Egg Cholestrol Myth

  • Location:USA

Posted 06 January 2011 - 07:48 AM

Humm...nuts, beans, fruits, and vegetables. That's pretty close to my diet. I had 3 eggs tonight.




Eggs are full of methionine. That alone is enough to be atherogenic. They are low in carbohydrate and do contain an abundant amount of other nutrients as well (such as choline), but do to the excessive methionine and IGF-1 production, I don't think I would consider them anti-aging.


So that would apply to people who eat alot of eat then too, right? Since meat is fairly high in methionine. As high as eggs in some cases.


Apparently. Though again, completely excluding meat from the diet might not be a good idea if there are nutrients in meat we don't know about that can't be supplemented. I know that issue has been discussed here before. As far as methionine causing coronary artery disease, the animal studies have been found in at least one study to correlate to humans as well:

adjusting for age, examination years, BMI, urinary nicotine metabolites
and protein intake (excluding methionine), the relative risks of acute
coronary event in the three highest quarters of dietary methionine
intake were 1.31 (95% CI: 0.92, 1.86) [for an intake of 1.7- 2 g Met/d],
1.31 (95% CI: 0.88, 1.96) [2-2.6 g Met/d], and 2.08 (95% CI: 1.31, 3.29)
[> 2.6 g Met/d] as compared with the lowest quarter [<1.7 g Met/d]."


I don't know if there's any reason to not believe that an even lower intake of methionine might drive the risk down further. Further studies are needed.

I dont mind if its not anti-aging, but it can't cause harm right? Im trying to bulk.


Eggs are awesome for bulking since they are high in methionine and increase IGF-1, but they might speed up the aging process. If you're in your 20s, you probably won't notice it.

Check out this guy. He's 72 years old and maintains his physique on a diet consisting of only nuts, beans, fruits and vegetables...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iUvjXQHt6QQ&feature=related

Not bad.


hes black...

but seriously though, nuts are great for bulking also.


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#8 kismet Re: Egg Cholestrol Myth

  • Location:Austria, Vienna
  • yes

Posted 06 January 2011 - 02:28 PM

Is it true egg cholestrol doesn't raise our cholestrol levels? Would it be safe to eat 9 eggs per day as a healthy 20 y/o, genetically predisposed to high Cholesterol levels?

No and no. It would not be particularly healthy.

Edited by kismet, 06 January 2011 - 02:29 PM.

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#9 openeyes Re: Egg Cholestrol Myth

  • Location:Chapel Hill, NC

Posted 06 January 2011 - 02:57 PM

Humm...nuts, beans, fruits, and vegetables. That's pretty close to my diet. I had 3 eggs tonight.


Also similar to Clarence Bass (now 73), though he also has whole grains.

http://cbass.com/PICTORAL.HTM

Then you have Paleo author Art De Vany, also at 73:



Art and Clarence know each other and have a good exchange here:

http://cbass.com/The...olutionDiet.htm
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#10 Thorsten Re: Egg Cholestrol Myth

Posted 06 January 2011 - 03:31 PM


Is it true egg cholestrol doesn't raise our cholestrol levels? Would it be safe to eat 9 eggs per day as a healthy 20 y/o, genetically predisposed to high Cholesterol levels?

No and no. It would not be particularly healthy.


Is there anything that one puts into their mouth that you would consider healthy?
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#11 kismet Re: Egg Cholestrol Myth

  • Location:Austria, Vienna
  • yes

Posted 06 January 2011 - 04:43 PM

Is there anything that one puts into their mouth that you would consider healthy?

Not much.* It is unfortunate that you can't have a perfect and a healthy diet. C’est la vie. But if you are looking for compromises the evidence certainly points to one egg/d. Nine is quite worse on the risk/benefit(taste) scale.

* e.g. legumes, nuts, non-starchy veggs, most fruit, etc.

Edited by kismet, 06 January 2011 - 04:45 PM.

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#12 Thorsten Re: Egg Cholestrol Myth

Posted 06 January 2011 - 05:36 PM


Is there anything that one puts into their mouth that you would consider healthy?

Not much.* It is unfortunate that you can't have a perfect and a healthy diet. C’est la vie. But if you are looking for compromises the evidence certainly points to one egg/d. Nine is quite worse on the risk/benefit(taste) scale.

* e.g. legumes, nuts, non-starchy veggs, most fruit, etc.


You don't give much away but I would be interested in food choices that you'd at least consider partially healthy. I suppose people could pick faults at pretty much everything there is that is considered a food. Everything is contaminated with stuff that harms us from the viewpoint of critics. That's not a moan on my part it's just the way things are I suppose.

*Saying this I would have to chuckle at the irony if you were sat behind your desk tucking into a pot noodle as you typed out your responses :laugh: .. I mean if all food is bad and a killer maybe we should just not bother and join the masses with their american all you can eat diets? - We'd be more socially acceptable for sure!*

I'm not bashing you by the way I'm just interested that's all

Edited by Thorsten, 06 January 2011 - 05:40 PM.

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#13 VidX Re: Egg Cholestrol Myth

Posted 06 January 2011 - 09:46 PM

Eggs are awesome for bulking since they are high in methionine and increase IGF-1, but they might speed up the aging process. If you're in your 20s, you probably won't notice it.

Check out this guy. He's 72 years old and maintains his physique on a diet consisting of only nuts, beans, fruits and vegetables...

[m


Dude most probably orders kits of GH every few months. That's great obviously, just shows that it works.. Esp. as if this is the same J.Morris I'm thinking about (a well known bb'er).

The GH alleged pro-aging properties are based on studies of rodens or yeast, etc... It does not include factors like: the more lean mass you maintan - the better your body deals with fat/metabolism is working better, the better is your bone density, hormones like GH and testosterone ENABLES one to train efficiently at later ages, not to mention a whole bunch of other effects which may contribute to an overall longevity, which aren't testable on an animal model (you won't get a rodent on a fitness lifestyle with all the ins and outs, personal experimentation of what works, how one feels doing this and doing that, using that substance or another one.. a lot of variables are present, not so simple like you create a dwarf, it lives longer - woohoo - we should get rid of hormones so we'll die later. The question is - at what price, and another question is - may there is a difference WHEN you are deprived of these hormones. If at puberty - yeah, you basically stunt your development, but if your hormones end naturally, that's - past the main sexual maturation - it seems that just troubles start to arise, not a vice versa. For women menopause means - trouble and is not antiaging at all, andropause may be more gradual, but the result is still not pretty at the end....). So the whole "hormones are growth so it means - aging" may not be so one-sided as it may seem from the studies with animals.
JUST some thoughts on this issue.

Edited by VidX, 06 January 2011 - 09:54 PM.

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#14 JLL Re: Egg Cholestrol Myth

Posted 06 January 2011 - 11:07 PM


Is it true egg cholestrol doesn't raise our cholestrol levels? Would it be safe to eat 9 eggs per day as a healthy 20 y/o, genetically predisposed to high Cholesterol levels?

No and no. It would not be particularly healthy.



Dietary cholesterol from eggs increases plasma HDL cholesterol in overweight men consuming a carbohydrate-restricted diet.

Carbohydrate-restricted diets (CRD) significantly decrease body weight and independently improve plasma triglycerides (TG) and HDL cholesterol (HDL-C). Increasing intake of dietary cholesterol from eggs in the context of a low-fat diet maintains the LDL cholesterol (LDL-C)/HDL-C for both hyper- and hypo-responders to dietary cholesterol. In this study, 28 overweight/obese male subjects (BMI = 25-37 kg/m2) aged 40-70 y were recruited to evaluate the contribution of dietary cholesterol from eggs in a CRD. Subjects were counseled to consume a CRD (10-15% energy from carbohydrate) and they were randomly allocated to the EGG group [intake of 3 eggs per day (640 mg/d additional dietary cholesterol)] or SUB group [equivalent amount of egg substitute (0 dietary cholesterol) per day]. Energy intake decreased in both groups from 10,243 +/- 4040 to 7968 +/- 2401 kJ (P < 0.05) compared with baseline. All subjects irrespective of their assigned group had reduced body weight and waist circumference (P < 0.0001). Similarly, the plasma TG concentration was reduced from 1.34 +/- 0.66 to 0.83 +/- 0.30 mmol/L after 12 wk (P < 0.001) in all subjects. The plasma LDL-C concentration, as well as the LDL-C:HDL-C ratio, did not change during the intervention. In contrast, plasma HDL-C concentration increased in the EGG group from 1.23 +/- 0.39 to 1.47 +/- 0.38 mmol/L (P < 0.01), whereas HDL-C did not change in the SUB group. Plasma glucose concentrations in fasting subjects did not change. Eighteen subjects were classified as having the metabolic syndrome (MetS) at the beginning of the study, whereas 3 subjects had that classification at the end. These results suggest that including eggs in a CRD results in increased HDL-C while decreasing the risk factors associated with MetS.


http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/18203890

Edited by JLL, 06 January 2011 - 11:09 PM.

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