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Hydroxytyrosol in Olive Oil


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12 replies to this topic

#1 Sillewater

  • Location:Canada

Posted 04 March 2011 - 07:03 AM


Br J Nutr. 2010 Dec 8:1-5. [Epub ahead of print]


Effects of hydroxytyrosol-enriched sunflower oil consumption on CVD risk factors.
Vázquez-Velasco M, Esperanza Díaz L, Lucas R, Gómez-Martínez S, Bastida S, Marcos A, Sánchez-Muniz FJ.




Even with sunflower oil (which is 70% linoleic acid I think) the hydroxytyrosol helped prevent oxLDL. So people taking olive leaf extract may not be getting the beneficial components of olive oil. Also if you are buying cheap olive oil it may not have enough of the beneficial components. However, olive leaf extract does have other claimed benefits beyond its cardiovascular effects.








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#2 yoyo Re: Hydroxytyrosol in Olive Oil

Posted 04 March 2011 - 07:22 PM

low quality olive oil is low in w-6 and probably the best neutral tasting oil if you don't want saturated fat (outside expensive things like macadamia), so its what i recommend for my parents instead of 'vegetable oil' or canola oil.

I wish the abstract said how much the value improved.
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#3 Sillewater Re: Hydroxytyrosol in Olive Oil

  • Location:Canada

Posted 05 March 2011 - 06:44 AM

Posted Image
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#4 FadingGlow Re: Hydroxytyrosol in Olive Oil

  • Location:USA

Posted 06 March 2011 - 12:30 AM

Canola oil is better to fry with though. :P
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#5 Athanasios Re: Hydroxytyrosol in Olive Oil

  • Location:Texas

Posted 06 March 2011 - 12:39 AM

In case people were looking for an olive fruit extract, it is available. Last time I looked, I could only find the trademarked OleaSelect. There are probably others now, too.
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#6 niner Re: Hydroxytyrosol in Olive Oil

  • Location:Philadelphia

Posted 06 March 2011 - 04:59 AM

So people taking olive leaf extract may not be getting the beneficial components of olive oil.

I thought that OLE did contain hydroxytyrosol, among other things (like oleuropein). Is that not the case, or is the amount a lot less than in olive oil? FWIW, the polyphenol content of olive oils varies quite a bit.
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#7 Sillewater Re: Hydroxytyrosol in Olive Oil

  • Location:Canada

Posted 12 May 2011 - 01:07 AM

I thought that OLE did contain hydroxytyrosol, among other things (like oleuropein). Is that not the case, or is the amount a lot less than in olive oil? FWIW, the polyphenol content of olive oils varies quite a bit.


Totally missed this... sorry.

All are standardized to oleuropein right which may not have the hydroxytyrosol. It also depends on how ripe the leaves are, what time of the year, how they store it, etc... (just like with oil).

The benefit is most likely from the hydroxytyrosol (1), because these are actually absorbed and are then found in LDL molecules (also according to (1) it [it being polyphenols not hydroxytyrosol only in the paper] increases oxLDL antibodies leading to clearance).

Looking at study (2) olive leaf extract polyphenol levels vary quite a bit, Table 2 (in the study they extracted using water at various temperatures).

References

1. Clin Nutr. 2011 Mar 2. [Epub ahead of print]The effect of olive oil polyphenols on antibodies against oxidized LDL. A randomized clinical trial.Castañer O, Fitó M, López-Sabater MC, Poulsen HE, Nyyssönen K, Schröder H, Salonen JT, De la Torre-Carbot K, Zunft HF, De la Torre R, Bäumler H, Gaddi AV, Saez GT, Tomás M, Covas MI; for the EUROLIVE Study Group.

2. Stavros Lalas, Vasilios Athanasiadis, Olga Gortzi, Maria Bounitsi, Ioannis Giovanoudis, John Tsaknis, Filippos Bogiatzis, Enrichment of table olives with polyphenols extracted from olive leaves, Food Chemistry, Volume 127, Issue 4, 15 August 2011, Pages 1521-1525, ISSN 0308-8146, DOI: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2011.02.009.
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#8 TheFountain Re: Hydroxytyrosol in Olive Oil

Posted 12 May 2011 - 05:05 AM

There seems to be an ongoing cherry picking effort to invalidate plant-based everything on this forum, especially vegan staple foods. Sad. I guarantee that on a per gram basis alot of these foods are far healthier than alot of paleo foods though. At least from my studies on nutrient composition vs macronutrient and other non-desireable ingredients.

Edited by TheFountain, 12 May 2011 - 05:06 AM.

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#9 rwac Re: Hydroxytyrosol in Olive Oil

  • Location:Dimension X
  • yes

Posted 12 May 2011 - 05:43 AM

There seems to be an ongoing cherry picking effort to invalidate plant-based everything on this forum, especially vegan staple foods. Sad. I guarantee that on a per gram basis alot of these foods are far healthier than alot of paleo foods though. At least from my studies on nutrient composition vs macronutrient and other non-desireable ingredients.


I haven't seen anyone dismissing olive oil yet.
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#10 TheFountain Re: Hydroxytyrosol in Olive Oil

Posted 13 May 2011 - 07:41 AM


There seems to be an ongoing cherry picking effort to invalidate plant-based everything on this forum, especially vegan staple foods. Sad. I guarantee that on a per gram basis alot of these foods are far healthier than alot of paleo foods though. At least from my studies on nutrient composition vs macronutrient and other non-desireable ingredients.


I haven't seen anyone dismissing olive oil yet.



'Phytates in Raw Nuts'

'nitrates in vegetables'

'PUFA in everything non-animal'

How about heterocyclic amines in meat?

polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in meat?

Growth hormones in processed meat?

N-nitroso in meat?

I am not convinced nitrites in vegetables are worse than nitrites in meat based on one cherry picked paper.

We can cherry pick till our fingers are blue, all that will be left is a barren stalk where a tree once stood.

Nothing that will advance our cause there.
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#11 Michael Re: Hydroxytyrosol in Olive Oil

  • Location:Location Location

Posted 16 May 2011 - 03:13 PM

Br J Nutr. 2010 Dec 8:1-5.
Effects of hydroxytyrosol-enriched sunflower oil consumption on CVD risk factors.
Vázquez-Velasco M, Esperanza Díaz L, Lucas R, Gómez-Martínez S, Bastida S, Marcos A, Sánchez-Muniz FJ.

Even with sunflower oil (which is 70% linoleic acid I think) the hydroxytyrosol helped prevent oxLDL.

There's an interesting discrepancy here. The full text of the paper says that they are testing the hypothesis that "hydroxytyrosol would counterpart the potential pro-oxidant effect of sunflower oil and maintain the hypocholesterolaemic properties of sunflower oil, rich in linoleic acid," but they also say that the product used in the study is Oleoactive, which this presentation indicates uses high-oleic sunflower oil (74% oleic).

So people taking olive leaf extract may not be getting the beneficial components of olive oil. Also if you are buying cheap olive oil it may not have enough of the beneficial components. However, olive leaf extract does have other claimed benefits beyond its cardiovascular effects.


"Claimed," yes. "Reasonably-evidentially-supported," no Posted Image .

low quality olive oil is low in w-6 and probably the best neutral tasting oil if you don't want saturated fat (outside expensive things like macadamia), so its what i recommend for my parents instead of 'vegetable oil' or canola oil.


Was that what you meant to say? Low-quality olive oil is HIGH in w6, and is a lousy neutral-tasting oil.

Canola oil is better to fry with though. :P

Oh dear me no. It's loaded with highly-peroxidizable n3 and n6 fats. Frying is just a bad idea all 'round, but high-polyphenol, high-oleic olive oil is certainly better to fry from a health perspective. And while such oils will inevitably have a strong flavor when raw, frying saps the flavor of high-quality olive oil anyway.

So people taking olive leaf extract may not be getting the beneficial components of olive oil.

I thought that OLE did contain hydroxytyrosol, among other things (like oleuropein). Is that not the case, or is the amount a lot less than in olive oil? FWIW, the polyphenol content of olive oils varies quite a bit.


I don't believe that OLE contains substantial levels of hydroxytyrosol; certainly, I've not seen one standardized thus. But (a) IAC, certainly neither OLE nor hydroxytyrosol reflects the profile of polyphenols of real extra-virgin olive oil, which is the actual food that has the proper, long-term epidemiological and other data to support actual health benefits in terms of disease outcomes, and (b) taking a supplement of such polys is not equivalent to consuming an oil that contains it from the get-go: even in the case of hydroxytyrosol itself, and even as added to refined oil (as in this study), which seems a much better delivery ssystem than popping a pill, the bioavailability of hyroxytyrosol naturally present in extra-virgin olive oil appears based on urinary excretion to be about twice that of supplemental HT added post facto to refined olive oil.

Edited by Michael, 12 May 2012 - 01:54 PM.

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#12 yoyo Re: Hydroxytyrosol in Olive Oil

Posted 17 May 2011 - 03:14 AM

low quality olive oil is low in w-6 and probably the best neutral tasting oil if you don't want saturated fat (outside expensive things like macadamia), so its what i recommend for my parents instead of 'vegetable oil' or canola oil.

Was that what you meant to say? Low-quality olive oil is HIGH in w6, and is a lousy neutral-tasting oil.


yeah. afaik, cultivar/terroir is what affects w-6 levels. Processing means less polyphenols. Is there evidence that low quality olive oil has different fatty acid ratios? I also haven't seen anything indicating decomposition to glycerol & fatty acids is a health problem, which is the main distinguishing factor of evoo vs plain.
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#13 Michael Re: Hydroxytyrosol in Olive Oil

  • Location:Location Location

Posted 17 May 2011 - 12:50 PM

low quality olive oil is low in w-6 and probably the best neutral tasting oil if you don't want saturated fat

Was that what you meant to say? Low-quality olive oil is HIGH in w6, and is a lousy neutral-tasting oil.

yeah. afaik, cultivar/terroir is what affects w-6 levels. Processing means less polyphenols. Is there evidence that low quality olive oil has different fatty acid ratios?

You're quite right that cultivar, latitute, and climate affect fatty acid composition, and not processing -- though that of course cuts both ways, vis-à-vis your original statement that "low quality olive oil is low in w-6". You're here clearly (and quite reasonably) using 'low-quality' to mean either processed (refined) olive oil, or unrefined oil that fails to meet the 'extra virgin' standard set out by the Int'l Olive Association. So, two things. First, even using that meaning, a lot of the higher-n6 oil is of low-quality by dint of origin: there's a lot of lousy olive oil being produced in Tunisia and other Middle Eastern countries (which is not to say that there isn't any good stuff being produced there), and the climate and local cultivars do conspire to make it higher in n6; eg, the main Tunisian olive cultivars, Chemlali and Chétoui, produce oils with oleic acid in the low-to-mid-60 percent range, and other cultivars produce at the low end of their genetic range when grown there. Second, and (to anticipate) precisely on health grounds, I would stipulate an oil that had a high n6 or a low poly count to be, ipso facto, a low-quality oil, even if it were unprocessed and of very high quality by IOC standards, which don't include poly counts and only discriminate %oleic as part of screening for adulteration with seed oils, and thus permit oils as low as 55% oleic acid. (Yes, I know that this is a bit perverse: there are, eg, award-winning Arbequinas with very low poly counts indeed, and with %oleic too low for me to want to consume).

Typical supermarket olive oils, refined or no, have middling %oleic, because they are blends of oils sourced from a wide range of cultivars and geographic origins -- and certainly higher than most seed oils. Maybe that's all you'd meant; I took you to be saying that they would be high as olive oils go. Sorry for any misunderstanding.

I also haven't seen anything indicating decomposition to glycerol & fatty acids is a health problem, which is the main distinguishing factor of evoo vs plain.

I agree that "decomposition to glycerol & fatty acids is a health problem", but (a) there are a lot more things distinguishing EVOO from virgin and lower-grades of unrefined OO than FFA, and most of them do have health impacts: peroxide value, conjugated dienes (K232) and carbonylic compounds (K270), ΔK, and even the taste panel, which picks up a lot of things organoleptically that you don't want to put into your body but for which there is no established chemical test (fermentation byproducts, yeasts and molds, etc)) that does have health impacts.

Finally, unlike EVOO (low FFA) and many lower-grade unrefined OOs (high FFA), paradoxically refined OO has ZERO free fatty acids, because they're removed by the refining process.

Edited by Michael, 17 May 2011 - 01:21 PM.

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