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Does all clothing protect against photoactive damage?


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#1 InquilineKea

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Posted 03 June 2011 - 09:10 PM


I mean, there's some clothing that's advertised as photoprotective. But is there really a difference? If I wear pants and a jacket all the time, then will most of my body be protected most of the time?

http://en.wikipedia....ective_clothing

Edited by InquilineKea, 03 June 2011 - 09:15 PM.

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#2 Robert C

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Posted 03 June 2011 - 11:37 PM

I'm no skin care authority but a dermotologist told me recently that a typical t-shirt is SPF 7 or 8. However I have never had sunburn or even a tan with any clothing on even during long outdoor activities in the hot sun.
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#3 InquilineKea

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 12:02 AM

Wow so interesting: http://www.bikeforum...p/t-208198.html
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#4 Robert C

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 12:16 AM

Interesting link. I'm a typical guy and don't do much for my skin other than try to protect from obvious sun burn. I live in Houston and the summers here are long and hot. I walk a lot outside and always have a farmer tan where the clothing ends. I have a couple of UV athletic shirts and a number of normal synthetic fabric athletic shirts. I have never noticed a difference myself. Maybe the tight clothing that bikers wear in your link is not a good sun block.

I have snarked all day in the Caribean with smim shorts and a wet cotton t-shirt on and had a badly burned neck, arms, and back of legs; but no burn or tan on back. I might add that I'm caucasion with a normal complexion.
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#5 Forever21

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 05:17 PM

I like sleeveless shirts, tshirts, and short pants and flip flops. But then again, whenever I walk out of the house, there is no sun. Its always night time.
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#6 InquilineKea

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 06:07 PM

How do you manage to get these jobs? :p What is your job?
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#7 Forever21

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 07:21 PM

How do you manage to get these jobs? :p What is your job?


I'm in business.

But you can get night jobs. Night shift doctors, nurses, paramedics, geriatrics, police, night club dj, dancer, online casino, trading, etc.
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#8 mustardseed41

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 09:59 PM


How do you manage to get these jobs? :p What is your job?


I'm in business.

But you can get night jobs. Night shift doctors, nurses, paramedics, geriatrics, police, night club dj, dancer, online casino, trading, etc.


There are tradoffs to everything. Such as disrupting ones natural sleep cycle. The one we were meant to have. Even if taking melatonin it's not optimal to not sleep at night.
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#9 InquilineKea

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 10:22 PM

Hey Forever21, does natural sunlight enter your room in the morning? Or do you find a way to block it all out during the daytime? I think it's quite possible to trick your body into thinking that it's night all the time. And I'm definitely looking for some windowshade that could possibly block out ALL light.

Also, isn't it too cold to wear those types of clothes during night? Or do you live in a warm region?

There are tradoffs to everything. Such as disrupting ones natural sleep cycle. The one we were meant to have. Even if taking melatonin it's not optimal to not sleep at night.


You can just use those "natural sunlight" lamps
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#10 Forever21

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 10:26 PM

For some reason, I haven't adopted the new time zone of the country I immigrated to. I follow my circadian rhythm thank you very much.
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#11 Forever21

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 10:33 PM

Hey Forever21, does natural sunlight enter your room in the morning? Or do you find a way to block it all out during the daytime? I think it's quite possible to trick your body into thinking that it's night all the time. And I'm definitely looking for some windowshade that could possibly block out ALL light.

You can just use those "natural sunlight" lamps




Completely blocked.

Look up UV-protection glass windows, but in my case, its just blocked by blinds and thick curtain. Plus I have air conditioning so its like there's no windows at all.
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#12 InquilineKea

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 10:35 PM

Even incandescent light bulbs block out melatonin production though
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#13 Forever21

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 10:59 PM

Even incandescent light bulbs block out melatonin production though




It might be time to change what you think of a bedroom. Is it a place to have sleep in total darkness, make love and do all sorts of dark deeds with your partner or is it a Google Corporate Headquarters. What do you need light bulbs for?

Edited by Forever21, 05 June 2011 - 10:59 PM.

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#14 InquilineKea

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 11:11 PM

Sorry - what I actually meant was this: even if you block out all the UV rays, you'll still get the same light spectrum as incandescent light, so you won't get the melatonin you need when ur sleeping during daytime (and yes, a natural melatonin cycle matters rather than supplements since you can't continuously produce melatonin with supplements - maybe extended release melatonin might work? but even extended release melatonin doesn't have the peaks and dips of natural melatonin levels - and may not reach the parts of the brain that need it more than others)
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#15 Forever21

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Posted 05 June 2011 - 11:28 PM

And what I'm saying is, I don't have "incandescent light" in my room.
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#16 InquilineKea

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Posted 06 June 2011 - 12:26 AM

sorry, what i meant was this: you still have natural sunlight coming in during daytime, unless you block it all out with special shades. and if you don't block it all out, you're going to ruin your melatonin production (blocking out just the UV rays isn't going to help melatonin production - you have to block out everything except possibly red light).

Edited by InquilineKea, 06 June 2011 - 12:27 AM.

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#17 Forever21

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Posted 06 June 2011 - 12:32 AM

I don't have that problem.

Pitch blackness in my room during the day using only what I posted above.
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#18 Logan

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Posted 07 June 2011 - 03:33 AM


Hey Forever21, does natural sunlight enter your room in the morning? Or do you find a way to block it all out during the daytime? I think it's quite possible to trick your body into thinking that it's night all the time. And I'm definitely looking for some windowshade that could possibly block out ALL light.

You can just use those "natural sunlight" lamps




Completely blocked.

Look up UV-protection glass windows, but in my case, its just blocked by blinds and thick curtain. Plus I have air conditioning so its like there's no windows at all.



Are you really trying to protect yourself that much for sunlight, especially morning light? If so, sheesh, what a miserable existence. I don't think morning sunlight is so bad, isn't it the time when infrared rays are more present, the ones that might have protective and healing effects on skin?

If all you guys believe that there will be life extension therapies in your lifetime, there will certainly be very good therapies to repair a little sun damage. On the other hand, there may never be life extension therapies in our lifetime that allow us to stay fairly young, so it would be pretty sad to get old and never have been able to truly enjoy time in the sun. I just picture a bunch of young people that don't know how to get out and have adventurous fun, just living controlled by fear of a freckle.

I would love to meet some of you guys. I picture a cross between Christian Bale's character in American Psycho and Brad Pitt's character in Interview with a vampire.

Edited by MorganM, 07 June 2011 - 03:40 AM.

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#19 Forever21

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Posted 07 June 2011 - 07:13 PM

Are you really trying to protect yourself that much for sunlight, especially morning light? If so, sheesh, what a miserable existence. I don't think morning sunlight is so bad, isn't it the time when infrared rays are more present, the ones that might have protective and healing effects on skin?

If all you guys believe that there will be life extension therapies in your lifetime, there will certainly be very good therapies to repair a little sun damage. On the other hand, there may never be life extension therapies in our lifetime that allow us to stay fairly young, so it would be pretty sad to get old and never have been able to truly enjoy time in the sun. I just picture a bunch of young people that don't know how to get out and have adventurous fun, just living controlled by fear of a freckle.

I would love to meet some of you guys. I picture a cross between Christian Bale's character in American Psycho and Brad Pitt's character in Interview with a vampire.



Edited by Forever21, 07 June 2011 - 07:14 PM.

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#20 Logan

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Posted 07 June 2011 - 08:11 PM


Are you really trying to protect yourself that much for sunlight, especially morning light? If so, sheesh, what a miserable existence. I don't think morning sunlight is so bad, isn't it the time when infrared rays are more present, the ones that might have protective and healing effects on skin?

If all you guys believe that there will be life extension therapies in your lifetime, there will certainly be very good therapies to repair a little sun damage. On the other hand, there may never be life extension therapies in our lifetime that allow us to stay fairly young, so it would be pretty sad to get old and never have been able to truly enjoy time in the sun. I just picture a bunch of young people that don't know how to get out and have adventurous fun, just living controlled by fear of a freckle.

I would love to meet some of you guys. I picture a cross between Christian Bale's character in American Psycho and Brad Pitt's character in Interview with a vampire.


http://www.youtube.c...etailpage#t=65s


That really didn't make sense. Did you post this because I'm on Zoloft? I haven't been on it for a while now. I am going to start up again though. If I ever have a response like the one above it would have more to do with me being bipolar than being on any medication. I don't get overly manic on SSRIs either, so they don't have much to do with my comments either. This is funny. I'm just passionate about living life to it's fullest. It doesn't appear that some of you cave dwellers are anywhere close to knowing how to do that. Am I trolling? Maybe...
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#21 Forever21

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Posted 07 June 2011 - 08:27 PM

That really didn't make sense. Did you post this because I'm on Zoloft? I haven't been on it for a while now. I am going to start up again though. If I ever have a response like the one above it would have more to do with me being bipolar than being on any medication. I don't get overly manic on SSRIs either, so they don't have much to do with my comments either. This is funny. I'm just passionate about living life to it's fullest. It doesn't appear that some of you cave dwellers are anywhere close to knowing how to do that. Am I trolling? Maybe...




Edited by Forever21, 07 June 2011 - 08:31 PM.

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#22 Logan

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Posted 07 June 2011 - 08:42 PM


That really didn't make sense. Did you post this because I'm on Zoloft? I haven't been on it for a while now. I am going to start up again though. If I ever have a response like the one above it would have more to do with me being bipolar than being on any medication. I don't get overly manic on SSRIs either, so they don't have much to do with my comments either. This is funny. I'm just passionate about living life to it's fullest. It doesn't appear that some of you cave dwellers are anywhere close to knowing how to do that. Am I trolling? Maybe...



http://www.youtube.c...h?v=Chh4QO8qsyw



Haven't been taking that either. And I still don't see the relevence. I admit though I was in a fiesty mood when I made that post. To each his own I guess. I do think not letting sun in a room all day is a bit extreme. I slept great for many years and always had my bedroom window open to sunlight. Plus, I loved waking up to the sun in my room, I was always in a better mood and more energized in the morning, and I do not think it was impairing my ability to get good sleep. Now, I'm talking about a bedroom with one window, not those huge windows that allow tons of light in. I've also always been able to take great naps in the sun, actually better in the sun than in the shade, so maybe I'm just different. Or maybe it was the Zoloft that allowed me to do this.
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#23 Forever21

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Posted 07 June 2011 - 08:50 PM

Haven't been taking that either. And I still don't see the relevence. I admit though I was in a fiesty mood when I made that post. To each his own I guess. I do think not letting sun in a room all day is a bit extreme. I slept great for many years and always had my bedroom window open to sunlight. Plus, I loved waking up to the sun in my room, I was always in a better mood and more energized in the morning, and I do not think it was impairing my ability to get good sleep. Now, I'm talking about a bedroom with one window, not those huge windows that allow tons of light in. I've also always been able to take great naps in the sun, actually better in the sun than in the shade, so maybe I'm just different. Or maybe it was the Zoloft that allowed me to do this.




http://www.youtube.c...h?v=NxN2P-xNDTM

Edited by Forever21, 07 June 2011 - 08:51 PM.

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#24 Logan

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Posted 08 June 2011 - 02:02 AM


Haven't been taking that either. And I still don't see the relevence. I admit though I was in a fiesty mood when I made that post. To each his own I guess. I do think not letting sun in a room all day is a bit extreme. I slept great for many years and always had my bedroom window open to sunlight. Plus, I loved waking up to the sun in my room, I was always in a better mood and more energized in the morning, and I do not think it was impairing my ability to get good sleep. Now, I'm talking about a bedroom with one window, not those huge windows that allow tons of light in. I've also always been able to take great naps in the sun, actually better in the sun than in the shade, so maybe I'm just different. Or maybe it was the Zoloft that allowed me to do this.




http://www.youtube.c...h?v=NxN2P-xNDTM



3 times a charm. I'll be adding zoloft to lexapro and adjust doses accordingly. I'm still not sure what message you're trying to send. Is this your way of coming back and putting me down for using antidepressants? I'm not offended at all really, it's kinda funny. Do you think that because I take an SSRI I am not dealing with reality? I'm much more cautious and protective than most people I know that are not medicated at all. I think SSRIs are great-keep the stress levels low, help prevent major mixed episodes, and yes, they do allow me to have the fun I always was able to have long before taking SSRIs.
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#25 InquilineKea

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 06:41 AM

Hm, from a dead link - there appears to be some protection:


Tina Hesman Saey

From Boston, at a meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Sun exposure leads to wrinkles in double time, new research shows.

Inflammation makes the difference between young, supple skin and aged skin, say researchers at P&G Beauty, a cosmetics company in Cincinnati. Company scientists, led by immunologist Michael Robinson, compared skin from a group of 18- to 20-year-old Florida women with skin from 60- to 67-year-old women who had spent a lifetime in the Florida sun.

Researchers collected skin from the women's buttocks and outer forearms.

Comparing buttock samples allowed the researchers to determine how skin ages where the sun doesn't shine. The researchers examined which genes are turned on and off in young skin and aged skin.

Older skin cells turned up production of enzymes called proteases that break down collagen and elastin, proteins that give skin its spring and structure, Robinson says. As collagen breaks down, skin collapses into wrinkles.


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#26 Eva Victoria

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 10:45 AM

Here is a paper on the photo-protective effects of garments.
Garments As Solar Ultraviolet Radiation Screening Materials by Kathryn L. Hatch, PhD, Uli Osterwalder, MS

Attached Files


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#27 Forever21

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Posted 31 July 2011 - 02:52 AM

Now THAT is a high value share.

Thanks Eva. Will chew on this for a while.
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#28 InquilineKea

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Posted 12 September 2011 - 06:07 AM

Here is a paper on the photo-protective effects of garments.
Garments As Solar Ultraviolet Radiation Screening Materials by Kathryn L. Hatch, PhD, Uli Osterwalder, MS


Wow, truly amazing paper.

I just read it and analyzed it here: http://www.quora.com...of-UV-radiation
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