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Gotu Kola (Centella Asiatica)


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#1 nootropi

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Posted 09 January 2005 - 08:42 PM


GOTU KOLA

Centella Asiatica

Other Names: Centella asiatica, Hydrocotyle asiatica

Habitat: French West Indies, Africa, Phillipines, Brazil, China, Indonesia

Properties: Gotu Kola is an herb often confused with another plant, the dried cotyledon (seed leaf) of Cola nitida, commonly known as kola nuts, a well-known ingredient of Coca-Cola containing 3.5% caffeine.[1] Gotu Kola is not a stimulant, but rather a very nutritious herb indigenous to hot, humid climates.

Dr. John Heinerman, Medical Anthropologist, presented an address on Gotu Kola to the Second International Congress for the Study of Traditional Asian Medicine, held at Airlanggu University in Surabaya, Indonesia, September 2-7, 1984. He stated that Gotu Kola is used as a nourishing food and a valuable medicine in many cultures. The Hosa and the Mfengu tribes in East Africa have used it for both purposes. In the Philippines, the leaves are either consumed raw in salads or as a tea for tonic and stimulant benefits to the body. The leaves have been employed medicinally in the French West Indies, and Brazil to cure uterine cancer, leprosy and elephantiasis. In the People's Republic of China, gotu kola is used for fevers, common cold influenza, sore throat and liver ailments such as cirrhosis and jaundice.[2]

Folk and traditional medicine have deemed this plant to be a brain food, beneficial for memory and senility. Pharmacist Varro E. Tryler states that there is currently no evidence to support the use of Gotu Kola as a longevity promoter or to substantiate the extravagant claims made for it as a revitalizing and healing herb. Substantial data on its safety and efficacy are, in his opinion, simply non-existent.[3]

However, separate clinical studies to substantiate folk claims for its alleged memory enhancing properties have been done in the United States and India.[4]

In India, Gotu Kola, an Ayurvedic herb, is called Mandookaparni. There, an impressive study dealt with the effect of gotu kola on general mental ability of mentally retarded children. Whole plants were dried in the shade, powdered, and made into 1/2 gram tablets. Half of the thirty children studied were given one gotu kola tablet and half a placebo tablet daily. Apart from nutritional deficiencies, the children had no major illnesses. A Binet-Kamat test was administered and the children's Intelligence Quotients were recorded. Separate tests were also administered to record any changes in the children's co-operation, memory, concentration, attention, vocabulary and overall adjustment. After three months, the tests were repeated.

The findings showed that youngsters taking gotu kola had increased their powers of concentration and attention.[5]]

Another Indian study showed that gotu kola extracts administered over a period of 42 months to normal healthy adults in the 45-50 age group had several benefits: haemoglobin increased by a significant percent, and the mean levels of blood urea and serum acid phosphatase were decreased. Subsequent examinations have revealed that this herb has brought about a steady increase in blood sugar level (statistically significant).[6] A relationship between hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar levels, and mood swings, mental illness, fatigue, depression, confusion and schizophrenic tendencies is well documented. Dr. Heinerman feels that perhaps the 'memory enhancing' attributes of gotu kola may be attributed to the herb's ability to elevate blood sugar levels markedly.

Gotu kola is higher in the B-complex vitamin group than any other plant previously examined. This again may account for its effects on the brain.[7] It is especially high in thiamine (B1), riboflavin (B2), and pyridoxin (B6). B complex is necessary in providing energy for the body, by converting carbohydrates into glucose, a usable form of sugar for the body to burn. The B complex is responsible for the normal functioning of the nervous system as well.[8] A healthy nervous system allows for a better functioning and organized brain.

(Other nutrients include numerous free amino acids, especially aspartate, glutamate, serine, threonine, alanine, lysine, histidine, and aminobutyrate found in greater quantities in the roots, but also present in leaves.[9] The leaves also contain measurable amounts of provitamin A or carotene.)

Isolated constituents of gotu kola were applied locally on wounds in laboratory rats. This resulted in healthy new connective skin tissue and increased the tensile strength of the flesh, as well as decreased the size of the would area.[10] Asaticoside, a constituent of gotu kola was injected intra-muscularly or implanted directly into mice, rats, guinea pigs, and rabbits. It produced a rapid thickening of the skin, an increased production of white blood cells, increased growth of new blood vessels of the connective tissue, and an increased growth of hair and nails.[11] Lupus erythematosus was helped by extracts of gotu kola.

Other studies have indicated gotu kola to be effective for gastric ulcers, phlebitis and varicose veins. It has been used for leprosy and related skin disorders, eye lesions, and muscular atrophy.

One investigation of gotu kola was conducted in Provo Utah at Brigham Young University by a research psychologist who wanted to demonstrate gotu kola's amazing ability to overcome the negative effects of fatigue and stress when used in conjunction with cayenne pepper (Capsicum frutescens) and Siberian ginseng (Eleutherococcus).

Rodents were fed the three herbs by means of a surgical technique in which tubing was inserted under the skin, a couple of centimeters below the junction of the esophagus and stomach. Fatigue and stress situations were set up. One involved swimming in a bucket of cold water, and another was to jump a barrier in order to avoid a mild foot shock. Within 24 hours of administration of the three herbs, the animals could successfully clear the barrier after being dried off from the cold water treatment. Without the herbs, they required up to 72 hours to recuperate in order to jump the barrier. Dr. Mowrey concluded that a combination of capsicum, ginseng and gotu kola did have a beneficial effect on behaviour of stressed or fatigued animals whose metabolism are similar in many respects to that of man.[12]

From this research carried out in 1975, several large American herbal companies developed an "energy and stamina" formula utilizing gotu kola. Some of these can be obtained at your local health food store.

Bibliography:

1. Varro E. Tyler, op.cit., p. 113 2. John Heinerman, An Herb for Our Time: The Scientific Rediscovery of Gotu Kola, unpublished paper, (Sept., 1984) 3. Varro E. Tyler, op.cit., p.113 4. John Heinerman, An Herb for Our Time", op.cit. 5. M.V.R. Appa Rao, et. al, The Effect of Mandookaparni (Centella Asiatica) on the General Mental Ability (Medhya) of Mentally Retarded Children, Journal of Indian Medicine (August 25, 1973), p.9-12. 6. M.V.R. Appa Rao, et.al, The Study of Mandookaparni and Punarnava for their Pasayan effect on Normal Healthy Adults", Nagarjun, (JUly, 1969) p.41 7. John Heinerman, An Herb for Our Time, op.cit. 8. John Heinerman, Natural Nutrition, (Provo Utah: Woodland Books, 1984).p.85. 9. John Heinerman, ed. Gotu Kola, The Herb Report, (March 1984), p.2 10. Ibid., p.2 11. Ibid., p.2 12. John Heinerman, An Herb for Our Time, op.cit.



This Article is taken from The Herbalist, newsletter of the Botanic Medicine Society. COPYRIGHT Dec 1988. Membership in the Society is $25.00 Canadian per year. You receive four copies of the Journal each year and help to promote herbalism and botanic medicine throughout Canada.


Gotu Kola extract, (10% triterpene standardized), powder 500g can be purchased by clicking here.

Price:$45.00
Shipping Weight: 1.10 pounds

This vendor also sells smaller quantities, by request. All SHF's products are INTENDED FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION and fit the following classifications:

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Supplemental Health Formulations (SHF) was established in 1995 as a private label health supplement manufacturer serving independently owned pharmacies and professional healthcare practitioners located throughout the United States. SHF is owned and operated by James Dyer, a food chemist. Mr. Dyer received a Master of Science in Nutrition and Food Science from Wayne State University, Detroit, MI. Mr. Dyer has over 18 years of experience as a chemist and formulator for the dietary supplement and food processing industries.

Currently, SHF operates as a small licensed custom formulating and product development company in central Arizona. Our expertise is in the development and formulation of dietary supplements. We also carry a full line of supplement and food product ingredients.
Vitamins, Herbs, Amino Acids, Nutrients, Raw Materials
Products listed are available in the convenient pack sizes indicated. Other pack sizes may be available upon request. All products available from SHF meet or exceed nutraceutical and food grade requirements and specifications. Products will be shipped to the purchaser with a Certificate of Analysis whenever applicable. All of the products offered are warehoused in our climate controlled, licensed facility. Every effort is made to update the product listing and pricing, however, prices and specifications are subject to change without notice. Customers will be notified of any price or product specification changes prior to order processing. We strive to offer products that our customers require. If you have a need for a specific ingredient that you do not see listed, please e-mail us. Usually we can stock the product requested. Any technical questions can be answered by e-mail. Grade designations for ingredients are provided when applicable. Some products listed do not carry a grade designation, but do have a specified assay as provided on the Certificate of Analysis.


Ingredient Grade Designations
All of our ingredients are designated Food Grade, and are intended for human consumption. In addition, some ingredients may also have one or more of the following designations:
U.S.P.- Meets or exceeds the requirements of the U.S. Pharmacopeia
F.C.C.- Meets or exceeds the requirements as defined by the Food Chemicals Codex
B.P.-Meets or exceeds the requirements of the British Pharmacopeia
N.F.- Meets or exceeds the requirements of the National Formulary

Metric Conversions
1 kilogram (kg) = 1,000 grams = 2.2 pounds
500 grams = 1.1 pound
100 grams = 3.5 ounces

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#2 nootropi

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Posted 09 January 2005 - 08:44 PM

Link

Life Sci. 2004 Dec 17;76(5):585-97. Related Articles, Links


Protective effect of Centella asiatica on antioxidant tissue defense system against adriamycin induced cardiomyopathy in rats.

Gnanapragasam A, Ebenezar KK, Sathish V, Govindaraju P, Devaki T.

Department of Biochemistry, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai- 600 025, Tamilnadu, India.

Increased oxidative stress and antioxidant deficit have been suggested to play a major role in adriamycin induced cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure due to multiple treatments with adriamycin. In this study the cardio protective effect of Centella asiatica on myocardial marker enzymes and antioxidant enzymes in adriamycin induced cardiomyopathy was investigated in rats. The rats administered with adriamycin (2.5 mg/kg body wt, i.p) caused myocardial damage that was manifested by the elevation of serum marker (LDH, CPK, GOT and GPT) enzymes and showed significant changes in the antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT, GPx, GST). Pre-co-treatment with Centella asiatica(200 mg/kg of body wt/oral) extract significantly prevented these alterations and restored the enzyme activities to near normal levels. These findings demonstrate the cardio protective effect of Centella asiatica on antioxidant tissue defense system during adriamycin induced cardiac damage in rats.

PMID: 15556170 [PubMed - in process]

Link

1: Int J Dermatol. 2004 Nov;43(11):801-7. Related Articles, Links


Asiaticoside induction for cell-cycle progression, proliferation and collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts.

Lu L, Ying K, Wei S, Fang Y, Liu Y, Lin H, Ma L, Mao Y.

From the State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Genetics, School of Life Science, Fudan University, Shanghai, China. luluo@vip.163.com

Asiaticoside, isolated from Centella asiatica, promotes fibroblast proliferation and extracullar matrix synthesis in wound healing. The precise mechanism, however, in molecular and gene expression levels still remains partially understood. Using cDNA microarray technology, the alternation of genes expression profiles was determined in a human dermal fibroblast in vitro in the presence of asiaticoside (30 microg/ml). Fifty-four genes, with known functions for cell proliferation, cell-cycle progression and synthesis of the extracellular matrix, were significantly up-regulated in our "whole-genes nest" expression profile at various timepoints. Furthermore, mRNA levels and protein productions of certain genes responsible for extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis (e.g. encoding type I and type III collagen proteins) were evaluated by Northern blot and radioimmunoassay, respectively. As a result, there is a close correlation among the gene profile, mRNA and protein production in the cells response to asiaticoside stimulation. This information could be used for exploring the target genes in response to asiaticoside in fibroblasts.

PMID: 15533060 [PubMed - in process]

Food Chem Toxicol. 2004 Dec;42(12):1987-97. Related Articles, Links


Inhibitory effects of Centella asiatica on azoxymethane-induced aberrant crypt focus formation and carcinogenesis in the intestines of F344 rats.


Bunpo P, Kataoka K, Arimochi H, Nakayama H, Kuwahara T, Bando Y, Izumi K, Vinitketkumnuen U, Ohnishi Y.

Department of Molecular Bacteriology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokushima, Tokushima 770-8503, Japan.


Effects of the water extract of Centella asiatica Linn. on formation of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and intestinal tumorigenesis in male F344 rats were investigated. Treatment with the extract significantly decreased the number of larger ACF (with four or more crypts per focus) in the large intestine in the early stage, while the number of methylated DNA adducts was not decreased compared with that in the AOM-treated group. In the post-initiation stage, the extract significantly decreased the total number of ACF and the number of larger ACF, accompanied by a decrease in the 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-labeling index and an increase in the induction of apoptotic cells in the colonic mucosa. The incidences of neoplasms, the numbers of adenocarcinomas in the small intestines and entire intestines, and sizes of neoplasms in the entire intestines in rats fed C. asiatica extract at a dose of 10 mg/kg were smaller than those in rats given AOM alone (p < 0.05). The extract at a dose of 100 mg/kg significantly reduced the multiplicity of neoplasms in the small intestine (p < 0.05). These results suggest that inhibition of the formation of AOM-induced ACF by C. asiatica extract is associated with modification of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in colonic crypts and that the extract has a chemopreventive effect on colon tumorigenesis.

PMID: 15500935 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Fitoterapia. 2003 Jul;74(5):431-4.


Anti-oxidant activity of Centella asiatica on lymphoma-bearing mice.


Jayashree G, Kurup Muraleedhara G, Sudarslal S, Jacob VB.

Applied Biochemistry Laboratory, School of Biosciences, MG University, PD Hills (PO), Kottayam, Kerala 686560, India. jayashree@mbu.iisc.ernet.in

Oral treatment with 50 mg X kg(-1) day(-1) of crude methanol extract of Centella asiatica for 14 days significantly increased the anti-oxidant enzymes, like superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx), and anti-oxidants like glutathione (GSH) and ascorbic acid decreased in lymphoma-bearing mice.
PMID: 12837356 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol. 2003 May-Jun;30(5-6):336-42.

Effect of Centella asiatica on cognition and oxidative stress in an intracerebroventricular streptozotocin model of Alzheimer's disease in rats.


Veerendra Kumar MH, Gupta YK.

Neuropharmacology Laboratory, Department of Pharmacology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi, India.


1. Centella asiatica, an Indian medicinal plant, has been described as possessing central nervous system activity, such as improving intelligence. In addition, we have demonstrated that C. asiatica has cognitive-enhancing and anti-oxidant properties in normal rats. Oxidative stress or an impaired endogenous anti-oxidant mechanism is an important factor that has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cognitive deficits seen in the elderly. 2. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) streptozotocin (STZ) in rats has been likened to sporadic AD in humans and the cognitive impairment is associated with free radical generation in this model. Therefore, in the present study, the effect of an aqueous extract of C. asiatica (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg for 21 days) was evaluated in i.c.v. STZ-induced cognitive impairment and oxidative stress in rats. 3. Male Wistar rats were injected with STZ (3 mg/kg, i.c.v.) bilaterally on the days 1 and 3. Cognitive behaviour was assessed using passive avoidance and elevated plus-maze paradigms on the days 13, 14 and 21. Rats were killed on the day 21 for estimation of oxidative stress parameters (malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione, superoxide dismutase and catalase) in the whole brain upon completion of the behavioural task. 4. Rats treated with C. asiatica showed a dose-dependent increase in cognitive behaviour in both paradigms. A significant decrease in MDA and an increase in glutathione and catalase levels were observed only in rats treated with 200 and 300 mg/kg C. asiatica. 5. The present findings indicate that an aqueous extract of C. asiatica is effective in preventing the cognitive deficits, as well as the oxidative stress, caused by i.c.v. STZ in rats.


Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2003 Feb;74(3):579-85.


Effect of Centella asiatica on pentylenetetrazole-induced kindling, cognition and oxidative stress in rats.


Gupta YK, Veerendra Kumar MH, Srivastava AK.

Neuropharmacology Laboratory, Department of Pharmacology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, 110029, New Delhi, India. ykg@hotmail.com


Cognitive impairment in epileptics may be a consequence of the epileptogenic process as well as antiepileptic medication. Thus, there is a need for drugs, which can suppress epileptogenesis as well as prevent cognitive impairment. In the present study, the effect of aqueous extract of Centella asiatica (CA) (100 and 300 mg/kg), an Indian medicinal plant known to possess antiepileptic, cognitive-enhancing and antioxidant property, was evaluated on the course of kindling development, kindling-induced learning deficit and oxidative stress markers in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) kindled rats. Male Wistar rats were injected PTZ (30 mg/kg ip) once every alternate day (48+/-2 h) until the development of the kindling. Passive avoidance test and spontaneous locomotor activity were carried out 24 and 48 h after the last administration of PTZ, while the oxidative stress parameters (malondialdehyde [MDA] and glutathione) were carried out in the whole brain upon completion of the behavioral assessment. The administration of CA (300 mg/kg orally) decreased the PTZ-kindled seizures and showed improvement in the learning deficit induced by PTZ kindling as evidenced by decreased seizure score and increased latencies in passive avoidance behavior. However, low dose of the CA (100 mg/kg) showed improvement only in the learning deficit due to the kindling and failed to improve the seizure score. The findings suggest the potential of aqueous extract of CA as adjuvant to antiepileptic drugs with an added advantage of preventing cognitive impairment.

Res Commun Mol Pathol Pharmacol. 2000 Jul-Aug;108(1-2):75-86.

Asiatic acid derivatives protect cultured cortical neurons from glutamate-induced excitotoxicity.


Lee MK, Kim SR, Sung SH, Lim D, Kim H, Choi H, Park HK, Je S, Ki YC.

College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Korea.


Asiatic acid, a triterpene of Centella asiatica (L.) Urban (Umbelliferae), has been patented as a treatment for dementia and an enhancer of cognition by the Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft (EP 0 383 171 A2).
We modified the chemical structure of asiatic acid and obtained 36 derivatives of asiatic acid in an attempt to prepare neuroprotective compounds that were more efficacious than asiatic acid itself. The neuroprotective activities of these derivatives were evaluated using primary cultures of rat cortical neurons insulted with the neurotoxin, glutamate, as an in vitro screening system. Among the semi-synthesized derivatives, three derivatives significantly mitigated the neurotoxicity induced by glutamate in this screening system. The neuroprotective activities of these 3 derivatives appeared to be more powerful than that of asiatic acid itself. These 3 derivatives significantly attenuated decreases in the levels of glutathione, glutathione peroxidase and other enzymes, which participate in the cellular defense mechanisms blunting oxidative stress. Furthermore, they significantly reduced the overproduction of NO induced by glutamate. These results showed that these derivatives of asiatic acid exerted significant neuroprotective effects on cultured cortical cells by their potentiation of the cellular oxidative defense mechanism. Therefore, these agents may prove to be efficacious in protecting neurons from the oxidative damage caused by exposure to excess glutamate.

J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2000 Dec;20(6):680-4.

A double-blind, placebo-controlled study on the effects of Gotu Kola (Centella asiatica) on acoustic startle response in healthy subjects.

Bradwejn J, Zhou Y, Koszycki D, Shlik J.

Royal Ottawa Hospital and the Department of Psychiatry, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. jbradwej@rohcg.on.ca


Investigations of the pharmacologic profile of medicinal plants have revealed that a number of plants with purported anxiolytic activity bind to cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors. This finding is intriguing in view of the proposed involvement of CCK in the pathophysiology of fear and anxiety. This double-blind, placebo-controlled study was undertaken to evaluate the anxiolytic activity of Gotu Kola (Centella asiatica) in healthy subjects. Gotu Kola has been used for centuries in Ayurvedic and traditional Chinese medicine to alleviate symptoms of depression and anxiety. Recent studies in the rat have shown that long-term pretreatment with Gotu Kola decreases locomotor activity, enhances elevated-plus maze performance, and attenuates the acoustic startle response (ASR). In this study, the authors evaluated the effects of Gotu Kola on the ASR in humans. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive either a single 12-g orally administered dose of Gotu Kola (N = 20) or placebo (N = 20). The results revealed that compared with placebo, Gotu Kola significantly attenuated the peak ASR amplitude 30 and 60 minutes after treatment. Gotu Kola had no significant effect on self-rated mood, heart rate, or blood pressure. These preliminary findings suggest that Gotu Kola has anxiolytic activity in humans as revealed by the ASR. It remains to be seen whether this herb has therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of anxiety syndromes.
Publication Types:
Clinical Trial
Randomized Controlled Trial

PMID: 11106141 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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#3 lynx

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Posted 10 January 2005 - 09:50 PM

Adam,
There is no doubt that this and other herbal extracts are beneficial, but most of the effects listed above can be more reliably achieved using PBN/NtBHA. So why mess around with all these other things?
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#4 outsider

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Posted 26 April 2005 - 04:32 AM

" Adam,
There is no doubt that this and other herbal extracts are beneficial, but most of the effects listed above can be more reliably achieved using PBN/NtBHA. So why mess around with all these other things? "

I don't understand what you mean. Are you saying PBN/NtBHA are the only thing you take ? Because if you add other nootropics it can have additive or synergism action.

Usualy people tend to take many supplements around here.

Gotu kola is considered to be a fountain of youth good for the mind and body and is the most popular herb in australia. They call it "the artritist herb"

#5 aikikai

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Posted 02 April 2008 - 07:00 PM

Hi,

I have started to take gotu kola for it is claimed effects as a nootropic and "over-all" health benefits.
Can someone provide more studies on this herb?

Also about the toxicity;
I have read that gotu kola is virtually non-toxic, and is used for treating liver disorder. However, there is info on the Internet that gotu kola has created hepatotoxicity in three persons (how does this go along with the acclaimed liver protection benefits?).

Is there any risks with gout kola?

#6 GoodFellas

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Posted 29 April 2009 - 01:58 PM

I just began with Gotu Kola too, so I'm wondering about the same;)

#7 desperate788

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Posted 29 April 2009 - 04:29 PM

I just began with Gotu Kola too, so I'm wondering about the same;)


I can guarantee that gotu cola has simply zero side effects, I took it for a year, recently ı started again. To my opinion its completely safe.
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#8 bgwithadd

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Posted 29 April 2009 - 06:10 PM

I odn't know how you can guarantee that. Everyone is different. Puts me to sleep, and makes me sick to my stomach....
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#9 immortali457

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Posted 29 April 2009 - 07:17 PM

I use it on my skin.

#10 GoodFellas

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Posted 29 April 2009 - 07:43 PM

I think that I might have been giving me a headache, could that be right?

#11 outsider

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Posted 01 May 2009 - 03:17 AM

Gotu Kola is not toxic.

#12 bobman

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Posted 30 October 2009 - 10:43 PM

Hey all, long time lurker.

I've been researching Gotu Kola's effects on healthy subject cognition, and have noticed that the traditional recommendation for cognitive effects in Ayurvedic texts involves milk as the extraction medium. I've been using Gotu Kola powder with a tea/water base so far.

So, does anyone have any information regarding milk vs water extracts/preperations. Also, what ratio of milk/centella do you use? How've the results been?

By the way, for anyone who hasn't used this stuff, I would give it a long term shot. It exhibits significant antioxidant properties in the brain, and seems to upregulate dendritic arborization, at least in the hippocampus and amygdala. If you're a believer in animal studies, Centella seems to be incredible. If you need to see proof in healthy subjects, here is the only study I've found:

http://www.eurojourn...jsr_31_4_06.pdf

The synopsis: In males long term retrieval, visual spatial thinking, and speed processing showed 95% statistically significant results, while females showed improvements in long-term retrieval, short-term memory, working memory, executive process, and delayed recall. Read the study for the description of the categories.

Some of these effects remained significant at the 90 day washout period. That's pretty impressive. At least one animal study noted maximal effects at 6 months chronic administration, so it is quite possible that the shorter-term administration in the above study (2 months) did not impart the full range of cognitive effects. To me what's most promising is the indication that these effects are the result of permanent structural changes.

For joint sufferers, it may be of some relevance as well. Google a study titled "Asiatocide Induces Human Collagen I Synthesis through TGFB Receptor 1 Kinase.

I'm thinking that maybe stomach acid negatively impacts asiatocides and any other possible compounds that impart the cognitive effects.

Chime in.

Edited by AlexK, 30 October 2009 - 10:48 PM.


#13 matthias7

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Posted 30 October 2009 - 10:56 PM

I am interested... Gotu Kola is one of the 3 main oriental herbs of longevity. The other two being Fo Ti (Ti Fo?) and ginseng (like 6 year old).

A good source of this stuff would be great!

#14 bobman

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 02:33 AM

Bumping this so more people see it. This has been of major benefit to me.

#15 chrono

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 03:38 AM

That's funny. I just spent a couple of hours reading through about 100 threads on gotu kola (though mostly they were brief mentions). This one didn't come up. Google search has seemed a little off since the redesign...

Anyway, I grabbed some of this when checking out a new local natural food store. I must say I've been pleasantly surprised by its effects. Very mentally stimulating, though in a much less "manic" way than piracetam and choline-family noots. I feel like it's inspired me toward more creative and "things I've been meaning to get to" kinds of tasks. Maybe a little anxiolytic, as well.

bobmann, I saw a lot of your posts as I was reading. What do you like for dosage and ROA? How many times do you take it in a day, and how far apart? I've found 500-750mg in tea to work best so far, but I've just ground and capped some to try for convenience. Have you noticed any difference between products or extracts?

Also, have you noticed downsides in any situations? Some days when I've tried 1g or slightly over, or have repeated my dosage, I've felt a little...frazzled at the end of the day. Had a very slight headache, maybe a little drowsiness, and lower-than-baseline concentration and executive functioning/verbal ability. Maybe a little emotional flatness, as well. Could be something else, but I'm wondering if anyone else has noticed.

#16 Yearningforyears

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 09:50 AM

Chrono
Nice to see that you´re feeling the gotu kola work.
. After a couple of days I noticed some kind of antidepressant effect, so maybe these long term effects will show themselves eventually for you as well.
I feel that compared to piracetam, this one is almost a mood stabilizer too.

Oh yep I definitely hear you on the emotional flatness part when using too much of the stuff.
Prepare for some very interesting social disinhibition when taking more than usal and mixing with a bit of alkohol ;)
You´ll just have to toy around with dosing for a while. Somewhere I´ve read that people with depression should be wary of using gotu kola, because it acts as a depressant.
I´ve never had any problem with that having light bipolar and all. In fact I enjoy a little flatness once in a while.

By the way... Gotu kola might make you more sensitive to direct sunlight, and too much can also cause rashes. Well, I think I´m gonna pay the tea pot a visit now! Have fun with the herb =)




Edited by Nicholas, 10 July 2010 - 09:57 AM.


#17 outsider

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Posted 11 July 2010 - 09:22 AM

Didn't expect to see one of my old post here. Once I even got nootropi on the phone.

From my notes:

In India, scientific documentation of clinical tests, by Dr.M.V.R. Appa Ras and his associates, showed increased mental activity of children in the trials. Fifteen, mentally retarded children were given a 500mg tablet of powdered gotu kola daily. After trials of three months, the children showed increased powers of attention and concentration, considerably above that of the fifteen children in the placebo group. Results also showed significant increase in IQ (4.6%), general ability, with improved behavioural patterns and expression, communication and co-operation.

#18 chrono

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Posted 11 July 2010 - 09:46 PM

I'll look forward to that social dishinhibition, I need some of that ;)

I'm still curious about whether anyone finds it beneficial to take multiple doses in a day, or if you think one dose is enough.

#19 bobman

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 04:14 AM

I'll look forward to that social dishinhibition, I need some of that ;)

I'm still curious about whether anyone finds it beneficial to take multiple doses in a day, or if you think one dose is enough.


The acute effect has a <1hr duration for me. Meaning sedation or stimulation, depending on how I take it. However activity of the fractions is of great duration. Once a day topical application is used wound studies for example.

I think one dose is enough, unless you are using it as a pick me up or anxiolytic. In which case the effects have a duration similar to dip/snus (when chewed).

Edited by bobmann, 12 July 2010 - 04:14 AM.


#20 bobman

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 04:27 AM

That's funny. I just spent a couple of hours reading through about 100 threads on gotu kola (though mostly they were brief mentions). This one didn't come up. Google search has seemed a little off since the redesign...

Anyway, I grabbed some of this when checking out a new local natural food store. I must say I've been pleasantly surprised by its effects. Very mentally stimulating, though in a much less "manic" way than piracetam and choline-family noots. I feel like it's inspired me toward more creative and "things I've been meaning to get to" kinds of tasks. Maybe a little anxiolytic, as well.

bobmann, I saw a lot of your posts as I was reading. What do you like for dosage and ROA? How many times do you take it in a day, and how far apart? I've found 500-750mg in tea to work best so far, but I've just ground and capped some to try for convenience. Have you noticed any difference between products or extracts?

Also, have you noticed downsides in any situations? Some days when I've tried 1g or slightly over, or have repeated my dosage, I've felt a little...frazzled at the end of the day. Had a very slight headache, maybe a little drowsiness, and lower-than-baseline concentration and executive functioning/verbal ability. Maybe a little emotional flatness, as well. Could be something else, but I'm wondering if anyone else has noticed.


Well I take the whole herb, so the dosage is higher. I've used up to ~ 12g a day consistently, although I'm backing off because I'm seeing possible warning signs of over-stimulated angiogenesis. I'm using 2-4g now.

I usually take it once a day, I find that to be enough. Biggest effect I notice from it is more energy, a flushed/healthy looking face and much less anxiety. I generally feel sharper as well.

When I first started using it, I was using lower doses, maybe 1-2g's, and when combined with black pepper (in tea) it was definitely sedative and made me spacey. However that went away with time. The only negative side effect is odd hair growth and the emergence of surface capillaries. This isn't necessarily a bad thing, and is most likely due to comorbid factors. I had a suppressed immune system prior to this due to smoking and a particular medication, and I've been receiving proliferative shots in my shoulders known to stimulate local hair growth and angiogenesis. However, I've noticed these changes on my legs as well. That's why I've decided to back down. Overall the stuff has been amazing though.

For those worried about cancer effects, there is one study, where 400mg/kg/day (if I recall) was used topically in a rodent model, and caused an increased lifetime rate of melanoma. There has also been one cell-line study, which showed a proliferative effect on a human breast cancer cell line (MB-231 I believe). However, another study showed the opposite effect on the same breast cancer cell line. It dramatically upregulates TNF-a protein 16 (11x in the mit assay), and several other apoptosis/anti-proliferative genes. It's a wide-field immune stimulant (only the water extract however), which bodes well for cancer regulation.

#21 outsider

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 06:56 AM

The cancer skin study is boggus, it basically used benzen with gotu kola and concluded that gotu kola was cancerous while benzen is a known cancerogen. Gotu kola is anti-cancer that's as simple as that. It's in the highest herb class of ayurveda and TCM so from that point of view, cancer theory doesn't make sense.
At 6g you get a great response from any adaptogen/tonic herb.

Edited by outsider, 12 July 2010 - 06:59 AM.


#22 bobman

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 07:39 AM

The cancer skin study is boggus, it basically used benzen with gotu kola and concluded that gotu kola was cancerous while benzen is a known cancerogen. Gotu kola is anti-cancer that's as simple as that. It's in the highest herb class of ayurveda and TCM so from that point of view, cancer theory doesn't make sense.
At 6g you get a great response from any adaptogen/tonic herb.


Good to know. It is a very impressive wound healing and CNS re-enervation agent. My body feels much healthier since I've started taking it. It does have some impressive preliminary cancer research, as well as documented benefits in ayurvedic literature, which is important given how well ayurvedic medicinal recommendations translate to western-evaluated medicine.

#23 adamh

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 09:02 PM

I'm a little concerned about it elevating blood sugar levels. I don't see how that could be good. Everything else sound fine.

#24 recitative

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Posted 13 July 2010 - 08:16 PM

I wonder if gota kola would combine well with piracetam since some people have said elsewhere that there might be a connection between low blood sugar and bad reactions to piracetam.


I'm a little concerned about it elevating blood sugar levels. I don't see how that could be good. Everything else sound fine.



#25 chrono

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 07:55 AM

I wonder if gota kola would combine well with piracetam since some people have said elsewhere that there might be a connection between low blood sugar and bad reactions to piracetam.

mmmm...gotu kola might be good to help you raise blood sugar if it's low, but I wouldn't start trying to raise your blood sugar just to get piracetam to work better. Setting aside whether it would work, you don't want to make yourself unhealthy just for piracetam.

But it's occurred to me, just from the mental effects, that it might have a really nice synergy. Planning to experiment a little with it myself, in the coming weeks.

#26 chrono

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 09:30 PM

^^ After trying it casually 5-10 times, my impression is that piracetam and gotu kola actually don't go together very well. It seems to impart a fogginess to complex mental tasks. Though I think it may synergize well for increasing attention, it has a slightly negative effect on mood, almost like I get from alpha GPC. But it is entirely possible (and perhaps probable) that this is an individual reaction.

It does seem to go well with ALCAR. My current plan is to use gotu kola on days when I'm taking a break from piracetam.

Edited by chrono, 15 August 2010 - 09:42 PM.


#27 outsider

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Posted 16 August 2010 - 09:32 AM

^^ After trying it casually 5-10 times, my impression is that piracetam and gotu kola actually don't go together very well. It seems to impart a fogginess to complex mental tasks. Though I think it may synergize well for increasing attention, it has a slightly negative effect on mood, almost like I get from alpha GPC. But it is entirely possible (and perhaps probable) that this is an individual reaction.

It does seem to go well with ALCAR. My current plan is to use gotu kola on days when I'm taking a break from piracetam.



Well when I was trying lots of mind herbs it was fine until I added aniracetam, mental fogginess came in. Aniracetam stand alone was ok. But I should say I would need more experiment in that department to be certain.

#28 aLurker

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Posted 12 December 2010 - 12:52 PM

^^ After trying it casually 5-10 times, my impression is that piracetam and gotu kola actually don't go together very well. It seems to impart a fogginess to complex mental tasks. Though I think it may synergize well for increasing attention, it has a slightly negative effect on mood, almost like I get from alpha GPC. But it is entirely possible (and perhaps probable) that this is an individual reaction.

It does seem to go well with ALCAR. My current plan is to use gotu kola on days when I'm taking a break from piracetam.



Well when I was trying lots of mind herbs it was fine until I added aniracetam, mental fogginess came in. Aniracetam stand alone was ok. But I should say I would need more experiment in that department to be certain.

Did you ever manage to narrow down which herbs interacted with aniracetam? I just ordered some gotu kola and I've been taking bacopa and aniracetam for a while now so I'd like to know how aniracetam and gotu kola might work as a combination.

#29 nooguyz

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 04:00 AM

The cancer skin study is boggus, it basically used benzen with gotu kola and concluded that gotu kola was cancerous while benzen is a known cancerogen. Gotu kola is anti-cancer that's as simple as that. It's in the highest herb class of ayurveda and TCM so from that point of view, cancer theory doesn't make sense.
At 6g you get a great response from any adaptogen/tonic herb.

I know I'm reciving an old topic, but...

 

Well, there are a lot of studies suggesting it's anti-cancerous, but as far as I understand the study, it suggests that if you have percancerous spots on your skin for example, then the chance that they will become carcinogenic is increased, and otherwise it is bogus? Or am I misinterpreting this?



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#30 jroseland

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Posted 23 September 2021 - 08:17 AM

Another Eastern historical Nootropic, best used in combination with Bacopa. It's a medium-term Biohack that after a few weeks of dosing enhances cognition, attention, and memory along with an anti-anxiety effect that imbues a modicum of spiritual enlightenment.
 
It seems to me to be a general-purpose Nootropic that aids the domains of performance enhancement that concern Biohackers...
Cognition
Mood
Immunity
Long term memory
Working memory
Stress response
However, in none of these dimensions does it really shine or would I call it a best-in-class Nootropic. If people want to use Gotu Kola, do so in the way it has been consumed since time immemorial, as Brahmi, in combination with Bacopa.
 
1*kqAn1jKA53oPk3HIl5IcDA.png
 

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