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OK to swallow the sublingual B12?


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#1 Brainfogged

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Posted 12 August 2011 - 11:47 PM


The brand is Jarrow methylb12.

They take like forever to dissolve and I hate having them in my mouth.

Can I just swallow them?
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#2 Forever21

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Posted 13 August 2011 - 01:02 AM

I dont get why some supp need to be sublingual in the first place. I'm taking Glycine and Methylcobalamin sublingually. I wish I could just swallow them.
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#3 Brainfogged

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Posted 04 September 2011 - 04:04 PM

I found some Methylcobalamin spray at 1000mcg/dose. So it would be 5sprays a day. I dont know about the potency though, anyone?

The spray is for the mouth but it seems that there are nasal sprays also. How good are these?
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#4 Forever21

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Posted 04 September 2011 - 04:33 PM

Could you please share it?

I wish also that those who would negative vote just help and be more productive. Explain why this needs to be sublingual.
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#5 Brainfogged

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Posted 06 September 2011 - 02:25 PM

I found a better one 2500mcg.
http://www.amazon.co...ef=pd_sim_hpc_3

Now a 5000mcg would be ideal.

Here´s some info on Nasal- spray. Can´t find any though.
http://www.stankurtz...ay-summary.html
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#6 Brainfogged

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Posted 13 September 2011 - 05:12 PM

So I have been corresponding with the salespeople from where I ordered jarrows MB-12 about this and they told me that it is ok to swallow them but the bio- availability goes down by 50%.
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#7 Brainfogged

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Posted 10 November 2011 - 07:47 PM

I mailed Jarrow about this, here is their answer.

Subject: RE: Methyl B12 5000mcg?


Thanks for your inquiry, Brainfogged. Yes, Methyl B12 may be swallowed whole without affecting absorption.

Ken
Tech support

Edited by Brainfogged, 10 November 2011 - 07:48 PM.

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#8 Sillewater

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Posted 10 November 2011 - 09:57 PM

I thought MeB12 gets broken down I'm the gut (ie. loses Me group)
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#9 niner

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 03:57 AM

I dont get why some supp need to be sublingual in the first place. I'm taking Glycine and Methylcobalamin sublingually. I wish I could just swallow them.


Wikipedia describes it as:

When a chemical comes in contact with the mucous membrane beneath the tongue, or buccal mucosa, it diffuses through it. Because the connective tissue beneath the epithelium contains a profusion of capillaries, the substance then diffuses into them and enters the venous circulation. In contrast, substances absorbed in the intestines are subject to "first pass metabolism" in the liver before entering the general circulation.

Sublingual administration has certain advantages over oral administration. Being more direct, it is often faster, and it ensures that the substance will risk degradation only by salivary enzymes before entering the bloodstream, whereas orally administered drugs must survive passage through the hostile environment of the gastrointestinal tract, which risks degrading them, either by stomach acid or bile, or by the many enzymes therein, such as monoamine oxidase (MAO). Furthermore, after absorption from the gastrointestinal tract, such drugs must pass to the liver, where they may be extensively altered; this is known as the first pass effect of drug metabolism. Due to the digestive activity of the stomach and intestines and the solubility of the GI tract, the oral route is unsuitable for certain substances, such as salvinorin A.


I mailed Jarrow about this, here is their answer.

Subject: RE: Methyl B12 5000mcg?

Thanks for your inquiry, Brainfogged. Yes, Methyl B12 may be swallowed whole without affecting absorption.

Ken
Tech support

Without affecting absorption? Then what's the point of a sublingual dosage form?
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#10 Sillewater

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 04:37 AM

Not the best source: http://www.healthier...-Neuropathy.asp

Even though both of these studies administered methylcobalamin intravenously, evidence suggests that oral methylcobalamin is just as effective. Look for supplements designed to be taking sublingually since methylcobalamin may degrade if digested.


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#11 yoyo

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 04:59 AM

I thought this was an issue of overcoming insufficient "intrinsic factor", especially if you are trying to make up for years of inadequate intake.
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#12 Brainfogged

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Posted 11 December 2011 - 01:12 AM


I dont get why some supp need to be sublingual in the first place. I'm taking Glycine and Methylcobalamin sublingually. I wish I could just swallow them.


Wikipedia describes it as:

When a chemical comes in contact with the mucous membrane beneath the tongue, or buccal mucosa, it diffuses through it. Because the connective tissue beneath the epithelium contains a profusion of capillaries, the substance then diffuses into them and enters the venous circulation. In contrast, substances absorbed in the intestines are subject to "first pass metabolism" in the liver before entering the general circulation.

Sublingual administration has certain advantages over oral administration. Being more direct, it is often faster, and it ensures that the substance will risk degradation only by salivary enzymes before entering the bloodstream, whereas orally administered drugs must survive passage through the hostile environment of the gastrointestinal tract, which risks degrading them, either by stomach acid or bile, or by the many enzymes therein, such as monoamine oxidase (MAO). Furthermore, after absorption from the gastrointestinal tract, such drugs must pass to the liver, where they may be extensively altered; this is known as the first pass effect of drug metabolism. Due to the digestive activity of the stomach and intestines and the solubility of the GI tract, the oral route is unsuitable for certain substances, such as salvinorin A.


I mailed Jarrow about this, here is their answer.

Subject: RE: Methyl B12 5000mcg?

Thanks for your inquiry, Brainfogged. Yes, Methyl B12 may be swallowed whole without affecting absorption.

Ken
Tech support

Without affecting absorption? Then what's the point of a sublingual dosage form?


I thought about this also.

Maybe sublingual has an direct effect whilst ingesting takes more time for the body to build up B12. I dont know, I hope someone can give us a better answer.
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#13 lourdaud

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 08:08 PM

Hi Brainfogged!
I used to chew the Jarrow lozenges into pieces and let them disolve freely in the mouth but apparently you shouldn't! At least not according to this guy, who seems pretty knowledgeable when it comes to CFS: http://forums.phoeni...Protocol-Basics See third post, third point.
So now I split my 5000 mcg lozenge into two pieces and let them dissolve under my upper lip, just like a snus hah, takes more than an hour..
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#14 hyper_ventriloquism

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Posted 13 December 2011 - 05:20 AM

The lozenges dissolve quicker if you move them around from one place to another in your mouth. Five minutes in one spot, five in another...

Edited by hyper_ventriloquism, 13 December 2011 - 05:22 AM.

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#15 niner

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Posted 13 December 2011 - 09:59 PM


Without affecting absorption? Then what's the point of a sublingual dosage form?


I thought about this also.

Maybe sublingual has an direct effect whilst ingesting takes more time for the body to build up B12. I dont know, I hope someone can give us a better answer.


Maybe the reason is that sublingual B12 is identical to the oral form in terms of treating deficiency. That's what they found in this paper, which compared both forms at a 500ug/d dose. If you're a supplement manufacturer, do you tell people they don't need the product they think they need, or do you give them what they want? It's conceivable that there are people who need a non-oral dosage form, and maybe sublingual could substitute for iv. I'll bet that the vast majority of people don't need it though.
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#16 Sillewater

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 01:02 AM

My understanding was that the point is for the neurons/brain to directly use the form methylcobalamin instead of having to synthesize it itself:
http://hansref.blogs...-brain-b12.html (note: this is my blog post btw).
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#17 niner

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 03:52 AM

My understanding was that the point is for the neurons/brain to directly use the form methylcobalamin instead of having to synthesize it itself:
http://hansref.blogs...-brain-b12.html (note: this is my blog post btw).

Is it common for people to be unable to convert either cyano- or hydroxocobalamin to the methyl form?
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#18 Sillewater

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 03:58 AM

Well my view of it is that there are studies that show possible benefit beyond being dietarily repleted in B12, thus since it seems pretty safe, especially at low levels like 1mg why not? Also my diet has recently cut down a lot on meat intake so it doesn't hurt.

Also to directly answer your question, in my post I refer to an eye study, I wrote that post a while ago but right now I can't find the study, when I do I'll post it, but the gist of it was that methylcobalamin provided benefits that cyanocobalamin did not. Also in terms of sublingual versus GI I learned from kismet a while ago that IF is easily saturated thus to increase levels sublingual is the way to go. One could also seperate doses by 4 hours I believe to get the same effect.

With regards to my earlier comment near the top of GI modification, the only study I could find is this one:

J Lab Clin Med. 1973 Apr;81(4):557-67.Intestinal absorption and concurrent chemical changes of methylcobalamin.Okuda K, Yashima K, Kitazaki T, Takara I.

But I can't access it.

N.B. to read about B12 absorption, http://www.efsa.euro...f?ssbinary=true, section 3.1

N.B.2 trying to find the eye study I found this collection of abstracts for those interested, http://www.integrate...ct/cobalab.html

Edited by Sillewater, 14 December 2011 - 04:17 AM.

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