• Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log In with Google      Sign In    
  • Create Account
  LongeCity
              Advocacy & Research for Unlimited Lifespans

Photo

[FightAging] More Mitochondrially Targeted Antioxidant Results


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic
⌛⇒ write a quiz!

#1 reason

  • Guardian Reason
  • 1,101 posts
  • 102
  • Location:US

Posted 31 October 2012 - 01:25 PM


The mitochondria in our cells generate damaging oxidative byproducts as a result of their operation, and that is the first step in a long process that contributes to degenerative aging. Researchers have shown that localizing antioxidants to the mitochondria can reduce this damage and thus modestly slow aging and extend life in laboratory animals.

Most antioxidants do not find their way to mitochondria, however, and have no effect on long term health or aging. Thus there has been some interest in recent years in designing compounds that do localize to mitochondria. One research group works on the mitochondrially targeted antioxidant SkQ1 and related compounds, and these scientists continue to conduct a range of studies in laboratory animals:

Here we evaluated the effect of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1 on markers of aging in the old OXYS rats, a unique animal model of accelerated senescence and age-related diseases, as well as normal Wistar rats. ... we compared effects of SkQ1 [on] age-dependent decline in blood levels of leukocytes, growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA).

Our results indicate that when started late in life, treatment with SkQ1 [not] only prevented age-associated hormonal alterations but partially reversed them. These results suggest that supplementation with low doses of SkQ1, even in chronologically and biologically aged subjects seem to be a promising strategy to maintain health and retard the aging process.

Link: http://impactaging.c...ull/100493.html


<br> <br>View the full article

#2 mpe

  • Guest, F@H
  • 275 posts
  • 181
  • Location:Australia

Posted 01 November 2012 - 08:29 AM

Seems to have many of the observed effects of c60 and olive oil.

Edited by mpe, 01 November 2012 - 08:29 AM.


Click HERE to rent this BIOSCIENCE adspot to support LongeCity (this will replace the google ad above).

#3 niner

  • Guest
  • 16,276 posts
  • 2,000
  • Location:Philadelphia

Posted 01 November 2012 - 02:01 PM

Seems to have many of the observed effects of c60 and olive oil.


I think that skQ1 is structurally similar to the c60-oleic acid adduct, and works in a similar way. C60 is actually a better antioxidant than the plastoquinone group on skQ1, so c60-oo probably works even better, although skQ1 is probably more directly targeted to the mitochondrial membrane. Maybe that's why they can get away with such low doses of it. The experiment they ran here was of short duration, and would be really interesting to repeat with C60-oo. It would require the ability to draw blood from rats and to perform various analyses on it, so it would need to be done in a well-equipped lab rather than at home. The beauty of it would be that you'd get results in months rather than years.

#4 niner

  • Guest
  • 16,276 posts
  • 2,000
  • Location:Philadelphia

Posted 01 November 2012 - 08:30 PM

By the way, in the Impact Aging paper, the senior author is Skulachev himself, and they claim that they have "No conflicts of interest" to declare. And yet, SkQ1 is now being marketed. Does this mean that Skulachev gets nothing from the sales?

BTW, should you want to make your own SkQ1, here's the procedure.

#5 mpe

  • Guest, F@H
  • 275 posts
  • 181
  • Location:Australia

Posted 02 November 2012 - 09:38 AM

Ha, ha, I read how to make SkQ1 (thanks niner). But I think I'll just stick 500 mg of c60 into a bottle of olive oil and shake.


#6 Turnbuckle

  • Member
  • 3,492 posts
  • 1,415
  • Location:USA
  • NO

Posted 02 November 2012 - 10:42 AM

Seems to have many of the observed effects of c60 and olive oil.


I think that skQ1 is structurally similar to the c60-oleic acid adduct, and works in a similar way. C60 is actually a better antioxidant than the plastoquinone group on skQ1, so c60-oo probably works even better, although skQ1 is probably more directly targeted to the mitochondrial membrane. Maybe that's why they can get away with such low doses of it.


Seems that they're not getting away with anything as low doses are actually better. The same might be true for C60--

In mitochondria, micromolar cationic quinone derivatives were found to be prooxidants, but at lower (sub-micromolar) concentrations they displayed antioxidant activity that decreases in the series SkQ1=SkQR1>SkQ3>MitoQ. SkQ1 was reduced by mitochondrial respiratory chain, i.e. it is a rechargeable antioxidant.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/19159610



Click HERE to rent this BIOSCIENCE adspot to support LongeCity (this will replace the google ad above).

#7 Turnbuckle

  • Member
  • 3,492 posts
  • 1,415
  • Location:USA
  • NO

Posted 02 November 2012 - 11:38 AM

A Russian study found a modest increase in lifespans of some SkQ1-treated mice, no difference in long-lived mice, and a more dramatic increase for voles and hamsters.

http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC3249456/




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users