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Which supplements are blood thinners?

blood thinners

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#1 ta5

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Posted 14 April 2013 - 08:18 PM


Can someone tell me which of these supplements are blood thinners? I know fish oil and vitamin E can thin the blood. I'm having trouble finding this info. Thanks.


Acetyl-L-Carnitine
Ashwagandha
B Complex
Bacopa
CDP-Choline
Chromium
CoQ10
Curcumin
DHEA
Fish Oil
Gamma E
Glutamine
Glycine
Gotu Kola
Green Tea Extract
Inositol
Magnesium Taurate
Phosphatidylserine
PQQ
Pregnenolone
R-Lipoic Acid
Relora
Rhodiola Rosea
Siberian Ginseng
Taurine
Theanine
Tocotrienols
Tyrosine

#2 Kevnzworld

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 01:25 AM

It's a controversial topic. I am currently on Xarelto, ( a prescription blood thinner ), so I have to be wary of supplements that might cause additional thinning . Some say CoQ10 does, there's not evidence of it that I've seen. I still take 200 mg of ubiquinol. Fish oil and vitamin E can definitely thin blood in high enough doses. I limit my fish oil and vitamin E, ..2000 mg fish oil, 400 iu tocotrienols, and gamma E.

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#3 niner

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 02:06 AM

I'm not sure why it would be controversial. There's an objective measure of blood clotting ability, known as the Prothrombin Time. This could be measured before and after people are dosed with any supplement, and compared. Maybe the controversy comes in because the measurements haven't been done, so we're stuck with people's claims. I don't know. At any rate, Fish Oil and Vitamin E are known problems. Warfarin is a blood thinner that works by causing a Vitamin K deficiency. Supplemental Vitamin K is antagonistic, but it just normalizes clotting; that doesn't mean that extra vitamin K would "thicken" the blood, or cause excess clotting in someone who didn't take Warfarin, absent some weird genetic defect.

I think that most supplements don't have much of an effect on clotting.
  • Agree x 1

#4 Kevnzworld

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 02:35 AM

The controversy exists because so little is really known about the blood thinning potential of many of the supplements we take, and there are contradictory claims. CoQ10 is a classic example, so is curcumin. . The problem with Coumadin and the PT/ INR tests is that they are so erratic.
The new class of blood thinners like Xerelto can't be reversed with vitamin K like warfarin can. So ingesting other potential anticoagulants or blood thinners can be hazardous .


#5 Luminosity

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 03:13 AM

turmeric

Is vitamin K a blood thinner? It is for me.

Things that bring down cholesterol could be blood thinners.

#6 Kevnzworld

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 03:37 AM

turmeric

Is vitamin K a blood thinner? It is for me.

Things that bring down cholesterol could be blood thinners.


Vitamin K regulates blood coagulation . It isn't a blood " thickener " per se. It is an antidote for blood thinners like warfarin. It ISN'T a blood thinner.
" Things " that bring down cholesterol , like statins? Statin therapy isn't contraindicated for people on warfarin...

#7 Luminosity

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 03:47 AM

Natural medicines like Puerh tea, certain supplements, etc.

#8 leanguy

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 04:35 AM

Many antioxidants do. Lipoic Acid, Grape Seed, Resveratrol.

#9 niner

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 11:44 AM

Sounds like we might have multiple definitions for "blood thinner", which doesn't surprise me, since it's a pretty vague term. Are we talking about prothrombin time, or the apparent "viscosity" of blood, or "gee, my blood feels thinner today"? There are other objective measures besides prothrombin time- I'd rather see the data than just hear claims, but it's probably the case that the data doesn't exist on many supplements.

#10 Mind

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 05:40 PM

Aspirin

#11 Adaptogen

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 06:21 PM

does the combination of aspirin and curcumin hold a substantial risk? my dad has been taking low dose aspirin for years, but i would like him to start supplementing with turmeric.

#12 ta5

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Posted 26 September 2013 - 01:26 PM

How long before surgery should one stop taking blood thinners?

I've always heard to stop a week before. Is a week really necessary?

#13 pamojja

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Posted 26 September 2013 - 02:18 PM

I think that most supplements don't have much of an effect on clotting.


That's my experience.

Wanted to see how many of my supplements have increased bleeding as risk. According to NaturalStandard - with my supplements taken in therapeutic doses marked in yellow:

Agents That May Increase Risk of Bleeding or Clotting

Agents reported to cause clinically significant bleeding in case report(s)
Garlic (Allium sativum), ginger, Ginkgo biloba, saw palmetto (Serenoa repens).
Agents that may increase risk of bleeding (based on evidence from basic science, animal study, human case reports/trials, expert opinion, or anecdote)
Acacia, acerola, aconite, agrimony, alfalfa (Medicago sativa)*, aloe, alpha-linolenic acid, alpinia, American ginseng (Panax quinquifolius), American pawpaw, Andrographis paniculata Nees, angelica (Angelica archangelica)*, angel's trumpet, anise (Pimpinella anisum)*, aniseed, annatto, aortic acid, arabinogalactan, arginine (L-arginine), aristolochia, arnica (Arnica montana), asafetida (Ferula asafetida)*, ashwagandha (Withania somnifera L.), aspen bark**, astragalus, avocado (Persea americana), babassu, banaba, barley, Bear's garlic, Bellis perennis, beta-sitosterol, bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus), birch (Betula barosma)**, black cohosh (Cimifuga racemosa)**, black currant, bladderwrack (Fucus vesiculosis), blessed thistle, bogbean (Menyanthes trifoliata), boldo (Peumus boldus), borage seed oil, breviscapine, bromelain (Anas comosus), bupleurum, burdock (Arctium lappa), calamus, calendula, capsicum, cat's claw (Uncaria tomentosa), celery (Apium graveolens)*, chamomile (Matricaria recutita)*, chaparral (Larrea tridentate (DC) Coville, Larrea divaricata Cav.), chia, chlorella, chondroitin sulfate, cinnamon*, clove (Eugenia aromatica), codonopsis, coenzyme Q10, coleus (Coleus forskohlii), coltsfoot, cordyceps (Cordyceps sinensis), cowhage, cranberry, daisy, dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)*, danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza), Datura wrightii, desert parsley, devil's claw (Harpagophytum procumbens), DHEA, diallyl trisulfide, dong quai (Angelica sinensis), echistatin, elder, EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid), evening primrose oil (Oenothera biennis)***, fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill.), fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum)*, feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium)***, fig (Ficus carica), fisetin, fish oil***, flavonoids, flaxseed/flax powder (not a concern with flaxseed oil), forskolin, fucus, gamma-linolenic acid, gamma-oryzanol, Ganoderma japonicum, garlic (Allium sativum)***, genistein, German chamomile, ginger (Zingiber officinalis)***, ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba)***, ginseng (Panax spp.)***, globe artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.), goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.), grape seed (Vitis vinifera), grapefruit juice, green tea (Camellia sinensis), ground ivy, guarana, guggul (Commiphora mukul), gymnema, gymnestra, hawthorn, heartsease**, hirudin, holy basil, horny goat weed, horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum)*, horseradish (Radicula armoracia), jackfruit, jequirity, jiaogulan, juniper, Kan Jang, kava, kelp, kinetin, kiwi, kudzu, lady's mantle, Lathyrus, lavender, lemongrass, leopard's bane (Arnica montana), licorice (liquorice) (Glycyrrhiza glabra)***, ling zhi, lotus, lovage root, male fern (Dryopteris filix-mas), marjoram, meadowsweet (Spirea/Filipendula ulmaria)**, melatonin, methylsulfonylmethane (MSM), mistletoe, modified citrus pectin, mugwort, mullein, nettle, niacin, nopal, nordihydroguairetic acid (NDGA), northern prickly ash, octacosanol, omega-3 fatty acids, onion, oregano, pagoda tree, pantethine, papain, papaw, papaya, parsley (Petroselinum crispum), passion flower (Passiflora incarnata), PC-SPES, peony, policosanol, polypodium, poplar**, populus, prickly ash (Zanthoxylum spp.)*, propolis, PSK, Pycnogenol® (Pinus pinaster ssp. atlantica), quassia (Picrasma excelsa)*, quercetin, quinine, red clover (Trifolium pratense)*, red yeast rice, rehmannia, reishi (Ganoderma lucidum), resveratrol, rhubarb, Roman chamomile, rose hip, rosemary, rue, rutin, safflower, sage, sarsaparilla**, sassafras, savory, saw palmetto (Serenoa repens), schisandra, scotch broom, sea buckthorn, seaweed, selenium, SHA-10, shea, shiitake mushroom (Lentinus edodes), Siberian ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus), sorrel, southern prickly ash, soy***, Spanish bayonet (Yucca spp.), spirulina, St. John's wort, star anise, stinging nettle, strawberry, sweet birch**, sweet clover (Melilotus spp.)*, sweet marjoram, sweet woodruff, tamanu, tamarind, tarragon, taurine, tea, thyme, tonka bean, turmeric (Curcuma longa), usnea, vanilla, verbena, vitamin A, vitamin C***, vitamin E***, wasabi, watercress (Nasturtium officinale), wheatgrass, wild carrot, wild lettuce, willow, willow bark (Salix spp.)**, wintergreen**, yarrow, yew, yohimbe.
Possible pro-coagulant herbs and supplements (based on evidence from basic science, animal study, human case reports/trials, expert opinion, or anecdote)
Abuta, acerola, aconite, African wild potato, agrimony, alfalfa, annatto, apricot, arnica, astragalus, bael, bilberry, black haw, blessed thistle, cat's claw, chlorella, coenzyme Q10, cordyceps, DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone), dong quai, ginseng, goldenrod, goldenseal, guggul, horsetail, jequirity, jiaogulan, lime, melatonin (multiple cases of prothrombin time (PT) reductions in patients on warfarin, some with minor bleeding possibly due to warfarin), milk thistle, mistletoe, myrcia, nopal, Panax ginseng (may decrease anticoagulant effect of warfarin), psyllium, raspberry, rhubarb, sage, scotch broom, shepherd's purse, skunk cabbage, stinging nettle, tamanu, tea, white oak, white water lily, yarrow.
Vitamin K-rich foods or herbs that may decrease anticoagulant effects of warfarin (Coumadin®) (based on evidence from basic science, animal study, human case reports/trials, expert opinion, or anecdote)
Beet greens, Bolthouse® Bom Dia Acai Berry With Blueberry Juice, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, collard greens, dandelion greens, endive, green pepper, kale, mustard greens, okra, red leaf lettuce, sauerkraut, spinach, spring onions, Swiss chard, turnip greens, white cabbage.
NOTE: Because passionflower, hydroalcoholic extracts, juniper, and Verbena officinalis supply variable quantities of vitamin K, they may lessen the effect of oral anticoagulant therapy.
NOTE: This is not an all-inclusive list.
* Agents with coumarin constituents.
** Agents with salicylate constituents.
*** Agents that inhibit platelets.

Copyright © 2012 Natural Standard. All Rights Reserved.


Practically only the addition of one agent increased bleeding: blood in stool, blood in mucous of the nose, and much more liquid blood (taking glucose readings) - and that's 1 innocent 81mg baby aspirin.

But that's only me, beware.
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#14 Dorian Grey

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Posted 28 September 2013 - 12:08 AM

I've taken many blood thinning supplements over the years, yet I've never had a problem with bruising, bleeding (gums etc) and even my shaving nicks stop promptly.

My girlfriend on the other hand takes almost no supplements at all, but she does take moderate amounts of aspirin for her headaches. She bruises horribly with the slightest bump and says her shaving nicks hemorrhage for 5 to 10 minutes and she must hold pressure with a tissue on them to make them stop.

Surgical procedures aside, I thing the whole bleeding promoting supplements kerfuffle is substantially overblown. Plavix and other prescription thinners are now prescribed so frequently it seems like everyone will be on them eventually if you live long enough. If the big guns thinners are so safe and good for so many people, I should think the minor thinning effect of most supplements in this category might also be considered as helpful more often than not so long as you are not at substantial risk for a serious GI bleed.

I've noticed anti-supplement propaganda has increased sharply over the last year or so and the bleeding risk is one of the favorite talking points. I'm a 57 year old male and I could use some moderate thinning so I'm not sweating my vitamin-E a bit. It may just save my life! Concern over mixing them with prescription thinners may be a valid point but I just say NO to prescription meds.

#15 Iuvenale

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Posted 26 July 2017 - 02:35 PM

I take 100+ supplements and I definitely have increased bleeding time. I don't have any extreme symptoms like petechiae. I suppose it may help me avoid heart disease, although I just hope I don't get in a car accident! My personal theory is that the high incidence of clotting issues and heart disease in modern culture might be caused by not eating "wild plants" (i.e., herbs), most of which seem to prolong bleeding time. Domestic vegetables have had bitter-tasting compounds (alkaloids) bred out of them. If our bodies evolved in times when people ate large quantities of wild plants, then not eating them will cause an unnatural prothrombosis state. My theory, anyway...

 



#16 Caravaggio

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 12:40 PM

Supplements that affect bleeding/arteries:

 

  • Echinacea (Echinacea angustifolia, Echinacea purpurea, and Echinacea pallida) - Echinacea significantly reduced plasma concentrations of S-warfarin, but did not significantly affect warfarin pharmacodynamics and platelet aggregation in healthy subjects.
  • Ephedra (Ephedra sinica, Ephedra equisetina, and Ephedra intermedia var. tibetica) - Ephedra may affect cardiovascular function and vasoconstriction, and, in some cases, vasospasm of coronary and cerebral arteries may cause myocardial infarction and thrombotic stroke.
  • Garlic (Allium sativum) - Garlic inhibits platelet aggregation in vivo in a dose-dependent fashion. The effect of one of its constituents, ajoene, appears to be irreversible and may potentiate the effect of other platelet inhibitors such as prostacyclin, forskolin, indomethacin, and dipyridamole.
  • Ginger (Zingiber officinale) - In an in vitro study, gingerols and related analogues inhibited arachidonic acid-induced human platelet serotonin release and aggregation, with a potency similar to that of aspirin.
  • Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba) - Ginkgo appears to alter vasoregulation, act as an antioxidant, modulate neurotransmitter and receptor activity and inhibit platelet-activating factor (PAF).
  • Ginseng (Panax ginseng, Panax quinquefolius) - There is concern about ginseng’s effect on hemostasis. One early study suggested that the antiplatelet activity of panaxynol, a constituent of ginseng, may be irreversible in humans. Other studies found that ginseng extract and ginsenosides inhibit platelet aggregation in vitro, and prolong both thrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time in in vivo animal models.
  • Green Tea (Camellia sinensis) - In an early in vitro and in vivo study, both green tea and EGCG significantly prolonged mouse tail bleeding time in conscious mice. They inhibited adenosine diphosphate- and collagen-induced rat platelet aggregation in a dose-dependent manner.
  • Kava (Piper methysticum) - In an in vitro investigation, a kava compound (+)-kavain suppressed the aggregation of human platelets. A pilot survey of extensive usage of kava showed that kava users were more likely to complain of poor health and had increased red-cell volume and decreased platelet volume.
  • Saw palmetto (Serenoa repens) - Platelet function was not affected by the administration of saw palmetto in a clinical study, and two case reports provided little evidence to implicate saw palmetto as a cause of bleeding. In a patient undergoing a craniotomy, however, saw palmetto was associated with excessive surgical bleeding that required termination of the procedure. This complication was attributed to saw palmetto’s anti-inflammatory effects, specifically the inhibition of cyclooxygenase and subsequent platelet dysfunction.
  • St John’s Wort (Hypericum perforatum) - The anticoagulant effect of warfarin, a substrate of the 2C9 isoform, was reduced in seven reported cases.
  • Boldo (Peumus boldus)
  • Danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza)
  • Dong quai (Angelica sinensis)
  • Papaya (Carica papaya)
  • Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) - Treatment with CoQ10 did not affect the absorption and distribution of the S- and R-enantiomers of warfarin but increased total serum clearance of both R- and S-warfarin.
  • Glucosamine and Chondroitin Sulfate - In a published report from the FDA MedWatch database, there were 20 reports of glucosamine or glucosamine-chondroitin sulfate use with warfarin. Coagulation was altered as manifested by increased INR or increased bleeding or bruising.
  • Fish Oil (EPA and DHA) - In vivo studies show that omega-3 fatty acids decreased platelet aggregation but did not influence bleeding time. In a clinical study, the inhibition of platelet aggregation by omega-3 fatty acid was gender-specific. EPA was significantly effective in reducing platelet aggregation in males, whereas DHA was not effective compared to the placebo. In females, DHA significantly reduced platelet aggregation but EPA did not.
  • Vitamin C
  • Vitamin E - Vitamin E intakes are associated with an increased tendency to bleed and in vitro and in vivo studies showed that vitamin E inhibits platelet aggregation. A vitamin E quinone metabolite may be responsible for the effects of vitamin E, and the reduced platelet adhesiveness of vitamin E probably accompanies incorporation by plasma lipoproteins 
  • Vitamin K

Commonly Used Dietary Supplements on Coagulation Function during Surgery

Chong-Zhi Wang,* Jonathan Moss, and Chun-Su Yuan

http://europepmc.org...cles/PMC4777343

 

I can personally confirm effects on blood from Ginkgo, Ginseng, Vitamin K, Glucosamine, N-Acetyl-Glucosamine and Vitamin E.

 

My latest added supplements were Glucosamine (2-5 g powder), NAG (750 mg capsule) and Vitamin E (all tocopherols + tocotrienols, 2x 274 mg capsules).

 

I guess that's what caused the bloody ejection every morning from my throat.



#17 Jiminy Glick

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 01:55 PM

You know what they say though, you don't want your blood too thick.



#18 Iuvenale

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 04:56 PM

Bleeding issues http://www.fullerton...nteractions.pdf

The following increase bleeding:
Garlic
Ginger
Gingko
Ginseng
Bromelain
Danshen
Don Quai
Fenugreek
Feverfew
Fish Oil
Gamma Linoleic Acid
Papain
Vitamin e
 
Agents That May Increase Risk of Bleeding or Clotting
 
Chamomile
Cranberry
Garlic
Ginkgo
Grapefruit
Lycium
Red clover,
St. John's wort 
 
Agents That May Increase Risk of Bleeding or Clotting
 
Agents reported to cause clinically significant bleeding in case report(s)
Garlic (Allium sativum), gingerGinkgo biloba,saw palmetto (Serenoa repens).
Agents that may increase risk of bleeding (based on evidence from basic science, animal study, human case reports/trials, expert opinion, or anecdote)
Acacia, acerola, aconite, agrimony, alfalfa (Medicago sativa)*, aloe, alpha-linolenic acid, alpinia, American ginseng (Panax quinquifolius), American pawpaw, Andrographis paniculata Nees, angelica (Angelica archangelica)*, angel's trumpet, anise (Pimpinella anisum)*, aniseed, annatto, aortic acid, arabinogalactan, arginine (L-arginine), aristolochia, arnica (Arnica montana), asafetida (Ferula asafetida)*, ashwagandha (Withania somnifera L.), aspen bark**, astragalus,avocado (Persea americana), babassu, banaba, barley, Bear's garlic, Bellis perennis,beta-sitosterolbilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus), birch (Betula barosma)**, black cohosh (Cimifuga racemosblack currant,
 (Fucus vesiculosis), blessed thistle, bogbean (Menyanthes trifoliata), boldo (Peumus boldus), borage seed oil, breviscapine, bromelain (Anas comosus), bupleurum, burdock (Arctium lappa), calamus, calendula, capsicum, cat's claw (Uncaria tomentosa), celery (Apium graveolens)*, chamomile (Matricaria recutita)*, chaparral (Larrea tridentate (DC) Coville, Larrea divaricata Cav.), chiachlorellachondroitin sulfatecinnamon*, clove (Eugenia aromatica), codonopsis, coenzyme Q10coleus (Coleus forskohlii), coltsfoot, cordyceps (Cordyceps sinensis), cowhage, cranberry, daisy, dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)*, danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza), Datura wrightii, desert parsley, devil's claw (Harpagophytum procumbens),DHEA, diallyl trisulfide, dong quai (Angelica sinensis), echistatin, elder, EPA(eicosapentaenoic acid), evening primrose oil(Oenothera biennis)***, fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill.), fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum)*, feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium)***, fig (Ficus carica), fisetin, fish oil***, flavonoidsflaxseed/flax powder (not a concern with flaxseed oil), forskolin, fucus,gamma-linolenic acid, gamma-oryzanol,Ganoderma japonicumgarlic (Allium sativum)***, genistein, German chamomile,ginger (Zingiber officinalis)***, ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba)***, ginseng (Panax spp.)***, globe artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.), goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.), grape seed (Vitis vinifera), grapefruit juice, green tea (Camellia sinensis), ground ivy, guarana, guggul(Commiphora mukul), gymnema, gymnestra,hawthorn, heartsease**, hirudin, holy basil,horny goat weed, horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum)*, horseradish (Radicula armoracia), jackfruit, jequirity, jiaogulan, juniperKan Jang, kava, kelp, kinetin, kiwi, kudzu, lady's mantle, Lathyrus, lavender, lemongrass, leopard's bane (Arnica montana), licorice(liquorice) (Glycyrrhiza glabra)***, ling zhi, lotus, lovage root, male fern (Dryopteris filix-mas), marjoram, meadowsweet (Spirea/Filipendula ulmaria)**, melatonin,methylsulfonylmethane (MSM), mistletoe, modified citrus pectin, mugwort, mullein, nettle,niacin, nopal, nordihydroguairetic acid (NDGA), northern prickly ash, octacosanol, omega-3 fatty acidsonion, oregano, pagoda tree,pantethinepapain, papaw, papayaparsley (Petroselinum crispum), passion flower (Passiflora incarnata), PC-SPES, peony, policosanol, polypodium, poplar**, populus, prickly ash (Zanthoxylum spp.)*, propolis, PSK, Pycnogenol® (Pinus pinaster ssp. atlantica), quassia (Picrasma excelsa)*, quercetin, quinine, red clover (Trifolium pratense)*, red yeast rice, rehmannia, reishi (Ganoderma lucidum), resveratrol, rhubarb, Roman chamomile, rose hiprosemary, rue, rutin, safflower, sage, sarsaparilla**, sassafras, savory, saw palmetto (Serenoa repens), schisandra, scotch broom, sea buckthorn, seaweed, selenium, SHA-10, shea, shiitake mushroom (Lentinus edodes), Siberian ginseng(Eleutherococcus senticosus), sorrel, southern prickly ash, soy***, Spanish bayonet (Yuccaspp.), spirulina, St. John's wort, star anise,stinging nettle, strawberry, sweet birch**, sweet clover (Melilotus spp.)*, sweet marjoram, sweet woodruff, tamanu, tamarind, tarragon, taurine,tea, thyme, tonka bean, turmeric (Curcuma longa), usnea, vanilla, verbena, vitamin A,vitamin C***, vitamin E***, wasabi, watercress (Nasturtium officinale), wheatgrass, wild carrot, wild lettuce, willow, willow bark (Salix spp.)**, wintergreen**, yarrow, yew, yohimbe
 
Possible pro-coagulant herbs and supplements (based on evidence from basic science, animal study, human case reports/trials, expert opinion, or anecdote)
Abuta, acerola, aconite, African wild potato, agrimony, alfalfa, annatto, apricot, arnica, astragalus, bael, bilberry, black haw, blessed thistle, cat's claw, chlorella, coenzyme Q10, cordyceps, DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone), dong quai, ginseng, goldenrod, goldenseal, guggul, horsetail, jequirity, jiaogulan, lime, melatonin (multiple cases of prothrombin time (PT) reductions in patients on warfarin, some with minor bleeding possibly due to warfarin), milk thistle, mistletoe, myrcia, nopal, Panax ginseng (may decrease anticoagulant effect of warfarin), psyllium, raspberry, rhubarb, sage, scotch broom, shepherd's purse, skunk cabbage, stinging nettle, tamanu, tea, white oak, white water lily, yarrow.
 
Herbs and supplements that might slow blood clotting
Turmeric might slow blood clotting. Taking turmeric along with herbs that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding. These herbs include angelica, clove, danshen, garlic, ginger, ginkgo, Panax ginseng, red clover, willow, and others.
 

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#19 Dorian Grey

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 05:15 PM

It would be nice if researchers could provide a scale relative to perhaps aspirin as a guide to just how substantial the thinning effect of a given supplement was.  

 

I bet the thinning effect of many of these supps is minimal compared to OTC medications & prescription thinners.  

 

Some perspective on relative risk is needed.  


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#20 Caravaggio

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Posted Yesterday, 10:37 PM

I think I falsely claimed Glucosamine and Vitamin E to cause the bleeding from my throat because it didn't stop after ceasing them.

 

But I suspect another supplement that I introduced again in a high dose: L-Lysine 3 g daily.

 

Lysine may increase the risk of bleeding and therefore should be used with caution by people with bleeding disorders.

https://www.rexall.c...iew/3787/Lysine

 

It seems to make sense because Tranexamic acid, a lysine analogue and medication to stop bleeding is involved in fibrin degradation.

 

"Lysteda (tranexamic acid) Package Insert"

 

Tranexamic acid is a synthetic lysine amino acid derivative, which diminishes the dissolution of

hemostatic fibrin by plasmin. In the presence of tranexamic acid, the lysine receptor binding sites of
plasmin for fibrin are occupied, preventing binding to fibrin monomers, thus preserving and stabilizing
fibrin’s matrix structure.

https://www.accessda...2430s004lbl.pdf

 

So does it work by blocking the Lysine from binding to the receptors? If yes than this would explain why more Lysine would cause a higher degradation of fibrin and therefore cause bleeding.







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