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gliSODin saftey?


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#1 ajnast4r

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Posted 05 August 2005 - 10:50 PM


so gliSODin increases serum levels of S.O.D, which converts superoxide radicals into hydrogen peroxide. Catalase and glutathione then convert the hydrogen peroxide into water. (atleast thats my understanding)

so could increasing serum S.O.D too much, without increasing catalase or glutathione create too much peroxide? especially in a healthy adult(im 24) who probably makes enough S.O.D anyway?

additionally; could increasing glutathione levels too much destroy TOO much hydrogen peroxide which in turn would have a negative effect on the immune system?
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#2 lemon

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Posted 06 August 2005 - 02:59 PM

It's true that free radicals have a limited use in the body. For example, white blood cells generate superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl to kill bacteria.

If you're worried about excess S.O.D. serum levels you should pick the time of day to supplement when you have the greatest need to combat superoxide radicals. I take mine in the morning after my workout.
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#3 lemon

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Posted 06 August 2005 - 03:53 PM

Another study found that small amounts of orally administered GliSODin® raised circulating blood levels of SOD by 89% in mice.33 Blood levels of catalase, another antioxidant enzyme, also increased to almost three times the level seen in a control group.33 Catalase is the enzyme that converts hydrogen peroxide to water, and high levels of hydrogen peroxide may contribute to inflammation and arthritis.34 The liver cells of the mice also demonstrated greatly increased levels of SOD and catalase, indicating that GliSODin® stimulates production of these critical antioxidants inside the major organs and deep tissues.33


33. Vouldoukis I, Conti M, Krauss P, et al. Supplementation with gliadin-combined plant superoxide dismutase extract promotes antioxidant defences and protects against oxidative stress. Phytother Res. 2004 Dec;18(12):957-62.

Catalase levels are also elevated so I wouldn't worry about a massive build-up of hydrogen peroxide. The only thing I'd be concerned about is too strong of an antioxidant defence.

I mentioned GliSODin a couple weeks ago now. If the studies are true about elevating serum S.O.D. and catalase levels this definately trumps every antioxidant out there (certain herbs have been shown to raise S.O.D. too but I digress).

Dietary antioxidants should be thought of as role players and not your primary antioxidant defence.
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#4 Guest_da_sense_*

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Posted 06 August 2005 - 05:55 PM

quote from this site: http://www.futuresci...m/deprenyl.html

One of the causes of mental retardation in Down's syndrome is the excess production of SOD. The excess SOD destroys some types of free radicals but, in the process, SOD produces more of the dangerous hydroxyl radical than the other antioxidant systems can handle.


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#5 lemon

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Posted 06 August 2005 - 07:33 PM

According to the study published by Vouldoukis I, Conti M, Krauss P, et al last December, GliSODin raises S.O.D. levels almost one time (89%) and catalase levels almost three times.

So ajnast4r's concern does not appear to be an issue (GliSODin is actually boosting circulating catalase more than S.O.D.).
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#6 ajnast4r

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Posted 06 August 2005 - 10:53 PM

According to the study published by Vouldoukis I, Conti M, Krauss P, et al last December, GliSODin raises S.O.D. levels almost one time (89%) and catalase levels almost three times.

So ajnast4r's concern does not appear to be an issue (GliSODin is actually boosting circulating catalase more than S.O.D.).



what doses were they giving in that study
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#7 london710

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Posted 07 August 2005 - 12:30 PM

hi newbie here,
Glisodin also increases glutathione peroxidase according to that study: (taken from sci.life-extension forum)
http://groups-beta.g...21fac93473077f6

PMID: 15742357 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


http://www.ncbi.nlm......ve&db=pubmed...



>From full text:


"The results of this
animal study were dual: the Glisodin® dietary supplementation
not only promoted the circulating and
tissue antioxidant defences (increased SOD, Gpx and
catalase activities) but also improved cell resistance to
oxidative stress. In the circulation, RBC from animals
receiving Glisodin® were less susceptible to oxidativestress-
induced hemolysis. In addition hepatocytes from
animals receiving Glisodin® dietary supplementation
were resistant to peroxynitrite-induced apoptosis and
mitochondrial depolarization."

"Table 2. Effect of a supplementation with SOD-gliadin combination
on circulating antioxidants


Supplementation


Control ------------------------------- Glisodin®
Antioxidant status (mmol/L) 1.39 ± 0.03 1.98 ± 0.06
SOD (U/g Hb) 1720 ± 125 ---------- 3250 ± 255
Gpx (U/g Hb) 800 ± 33 ------------- 1210 ± 89
Catalase (kU/g Hb) 35 ± 5 ---------- 95 ± 6


Animals were fed every day with control diet or with control
diet supplemented with 1 mg/mouse/day of Glisodin® for
28 days. Blood samples were collected and SOD, Gpx and
catalase activities were evaluated in erythrocytes. Data represent
the mean ± SD of ten animals/group from one representative
experiment."

So my question is what would be an effective human dose? lef.orgs product contains 100 mg, but i think i read somewhere that most human studies has been with 500 mg doses.

Just ordered glisodin 16.49$ for 60x 250 mg at vitanetonline.com. Anyone found it cheaper?
thanks, great forum

Edited by london710, 07 August 2005 - 10:00 PM.

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#8 lemon

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Posted 07 August 2005 - 02:03 PM

london,

Yes, Beyond-a-Century.com sells 50 grams of GliSODin for $41.50
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#9 ajnast4r

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Posted 08 August 2005 - 02:42 AM

Just ordered glisodin 16.49$ for 60x 250 mg at vitanetonline.com. Anyone found it cheaper?
thanks, great forum



is gliSODin stable enough to be made into a tablet? every other manufacturer has it in capsules
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#10 vastman

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Posted 08 August 2005 - 06:53 AM

lemon, how does BAC glisodin taste? I'm trying to look a bit ahead to which supplements I can begin using in "smart smoothy" blueberry concoctions as capping powders isn't something I want to get into at the moment.... would the bulk powder from BAC be tolerable?
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#11 lemon

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Posted 08 August 2005 - 11:19 AM

Not much of a taste at all. It would blend well in a smoothie.
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#12 lemon

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Posted 08 August 2005 - 11:21 AM

Although it's one of the more expensive supplements and I don't bother mixing or capping it. It's also a very fine white powder.
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#13 DukeNukem

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Posted 08 August 2005 - 03:36 PM

>>> lemon, how does BAC glisodin taste?

No taste as far as I can tell. I mix this powder into my morning smoothie, as well as in my post-workout shake, to help fight off workout generated free rads.

BTW, I seriously believe that SOD levels are one of the most important things you should maintain for long-term health. SOD levels, like so many other things about our biological system, slowly decline with age. I can't remember the study I read about a year ago, but it involved mice and the mice that lived the longest, by far, had the highest levels of SOD. I think Dr. David William's also reported on this in one of his newsletters in the last year, but at the time he didn't know how to raise SOD levels. I think this was right before GliSODin came out.

SOD, IMO, should be on everyone's list of supplements. Oh, and the currently issue of LEF magazine has a long article on SOD, too. It'll probably be posted on their site soon.
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#14 lemon

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Posted 09 August 2005 - 01:01 AM

Duke,

I agree... and if GliSODin really does elevate endogenous antioxidant enzymes like the studies are suggesting this is a powerfull supplement. Comparitively, it's like bulldozing free radicals instead of trying to hit them with fly swatters. The S.O.D. enzyme specifically targets the nastiest of free radicals (superoxide) many, many more time effectively than dietary antioxidants.

Maintaining high serum levels of endogenous antioxidant enzymes should allow other role players such as vitamin C to carry out more productive functions without needlessly sacrificing themselves to maurauding and highly unstable free radicals (superoxide) that simply are just too overwhelming for them.

That being said, I am concerned about downregulation and the possibility of eliminating too many free radicals. Free radicals have limitid use in the body. I've mentioned previously our white blood cells generate bursts of superoxide, hydrogen peroxide et al to kill bacterial invaders (that's why I also take this supplement after my morning work-out sessions when free radical generation is elevated).

Anyone have any thoughts or information to share on these issues?
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