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raw yolks as choline source for 'cetams?


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#1 joee

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Posted 09 October 2005 - 05:06 PM


I know that uncooked egg yolks are a source of choline (180-215mg?) and phosphatidylcholine. As I understand it, cooking the yolk kind of 'denatures' the choline and makes it unavailable.

With the high cost of choline suppliments, and my dislike of soy products (I was useing large quantities of soy lethicin)- I was wondering if raw eggs wouldnt be a cost-effective, nutritious source of choline for use with piracetam?

I am well aware of the so-called risks of salmonella poisoning, with one in 30,000 commercial eggs being infected, as well as the fact that raw egg white can leach biotin. Healthy, organic fed free range chicken eggs (healthy chickens lay healthy eggs) combined with biotin supplimentation, and properly checking eggs before consumption are obviously in order.

What do you people here think about useing eggs in place of choline supplimentation?

Im not worried about the cholesterol- I take in a good amount of fresh, ground flax, exercise etc- and the odd chance of salmonella poisoning dont worry me in the slightest - Im fairly young, and my immune system is in good order.

Im new here- great site by the way, there seems to be quite a few knowledgable, helpful people on board.

Thanks!

#2 Guest_da_sense_*

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Posted 09 October 2005 - 05:50 PM

Whole raw eggs are my source of choline and protien (and other stuff too). I eat 2-4 raw eggs a day for almost a year now. I've been buying them both from store and friend from a country, never had even slight stomach problem with it.
And my total cholesterol is near minimum :)

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#3 goku

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Posted 11 October 2005 - 02:27 AM

is phosphatidylcholine and choline very different substances? I've only been supplementing with phosphatidylcholine to support my priacetam dosing, is that a mistake?

#4 Mind

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Posted 11 October 2005 - 06:39 AM

Do the eggs have salmonella on the inside? I always though it was passed along on the shell, on the outside.

#5 joee

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Posted 11 October 2005 - 03:23 PM

yah, it would be in/on the egg itself.

Transmitted by a sick momma chicken into the egg.

Also, in restaurants where eggs may be left into the open for periods of time (think breakfast- french toast batter) is a good haven. If I remember correctly, ~60% of cases come from restaurants.

Ive been slowly introducing raw eggs into my diet. Heard its good to introduce them slowly, so as to give the immune system a 'heads up'. Seeing as how I am a cheap, lazy bastard- Im really starting to dig it. Getting used to the slimeyness too.

I figure its much better nutrition than cooking the egg and denaturing all of that high-quality protein. Plus, I dont have to heat any oils to grease the egg- so's I can better choose what kind of fats Im eating.

I get so excited over the little things :)

#6 Shepard

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Posted 11 October 2005 - 05:10 PM

Question:
LOL I take my eggs raw like rocky. besides food poisoning...what are the dangers of raw eggs? more cholesterol than cooked?

Answer:
You mean besides the small risk of salmonella, the much higher risk of avindin/biotin toxicity, and the fact that the heat-sensitive glycoprotein content in raw egg inhibits proper digestion and lowers the biological value of the protein from the ingested egg (as well as nutrient uptake from it) compared to if you had actually cooked it for a few minutes..?


This is an old post on Bodybuilding.com. Question was from Nick Nitty, answer was from Lok7y. Take it as you will.

#7 purerealm

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Posted 11 October 2005 - 06:23 PM

i couldn't ever eat raw eggs like that, the taste of them cooked is just too good

#8 haveblue

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Posted 11 October 2005 - 09:32 PM

Well I know that restaraunt chains in the US have been forced not to serve "sunny side up" eggs anymore. They must now be cooked at minimum over easy.

Do we know for sure that choline is destroyed in the cooking of eggs? I haven't been able to verify that anywhere on the net so far..

Also don't you think that when you hear or read that eggs are a good source of choline, that means cooked eggs? Or do you think that means crack the egg open and drink it raw? [:o]

#9 eternaltraveler

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Posted 11 October 2005 - 09:48 PM

egg is more digestible when cooked

#10 wannafulfill

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Posted 12 October 2005 - 05:25 PM

if you are young and healthy, eating fresh raw eggs is perfectly safe

#11 rfarris

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Posted 12 October 2005 - 11:28 PM

if you are young and healthy, eating fresh raw eggs is perfectly safe

Wanna, please forgive me, but from looking at your picture ("avator"), you're neither young, nor healthy! ;)

--Rick

#12 meatwad

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Posted 04 February 2006 - 03:31 AM

So... if I am understanding this correctly, the protein will not be as easily digested because certain glycoproteins which are easily destroyed by heat.

So eating raw eggs will result in poor protein absorption BUT still result in choline and PC.

Eat a raw egg or two with your ALA and wait for an hour then eat like normal?

#13 Paul Idol

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Posted 04 February 2006 - 03:05 PM

The trypsin inhibitors, which are deactivated by cooking, are in the white. The avidin which inhibits absorption of biotin is in the white and is also deactivated by cooking. The biotin and the overwhelming majority of the nutrition are in the yolk.

So eat raw yolks and cook whites and whole eggs. Or just toss the whites and eat the raw yolks. That's how I eat the vast majority of my eggs.

-Paul

#14 FunkOdyssey

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Posted 04 February 2006 - 04:11 PM

So eat raw yolks and cook whites


Isn't that basically what you are doing when you cook an egg sunny side up? Thats the way I usually eat them.

#15 Paul Idol

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Posted 04 February 2006 - 06:03 PM

Isn't that basically what you are doing when you cook an egg sunny side up?  Thats the way I usually eat them.


Pretty much. I don't know what degree nutrient loss you're incurring by cooking the yolk a little, but I'd imagine you're still getting most of the benefits.

-Paul

#16 Guest_Isochroma_*

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Posted 25 June 2008 - 01:17 AM

After four days on 5-7g / day piracetam, I had what was probably the beginning of a headache, just a mild tension in the head. I never get anything like a headache normally.

So I started eating my favorite (though rarely eaten) delicious raw egg yolks! Threw out the useless, allergenic and biotin-binding whites. Six raw egg yolks and the quasi-headache was gone in hours. Never to return. So I'll be eating six each day, since they're cheap and delicious.

So yes, RAW EGG YOLKS WORK TO REMOVE 'CETAM HEADACHES! Plus, they've full of tons of really valuable nutrients, especially lecithin, DHA and lutein. Never been sick from them yet (eaten probably ten dozen in the last six months).

If you're worried about bacteria, just eat it with fresh yoghurt; the lactobacilli and their natural antibiotics will totally overpower any salmonella.

Edited by Isochroma, 25 June 2008 - 01:18 AM.


#17 kenj

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Posted 25 June 2008 - 06:25 AM

I'm not sure there's any reason to separate the whites from the yolk? The Egg (note the capital) is just a perfect food, AFAIK. (Ok, maybe skip the egg shell.)

Anyway, that's an idea for the next smart drink in a CAN: piracetam with egg yolks (don't forget the odd 15mg vitamin C and 0.54mg vitamin B5)..........

#18 Guest_Isochroma_*

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Posted 25 June 2008 - 07:08 AM

There is one imperfection (at least) in eating raw egg whites: avidin, which binds biotin. Also, volumetrically a large part of the egg, though much less useful than the yolk, it provides the same risk per ml of fluid contamination with pathogens.

Also, its proteins when uncooked can cause allergic reactions. Plus I'm not into eating them for taste reasons.

So I throw them out, without a doubt!
Down the sink with a resounding plink
go the whites as yolks go to the drink

Your drink suggestion sounds good, except for the taste.

#19 kenj

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Posted 25 June 2008 - 08:04 AM

>>> There is one imperfection (at least) in eating raw egg whites: avidin, which binds biotin.

But the yolk contains biotin. Nature is smart, ISTM.

>>> Your drink suggestion sounds good, except for the taste.

You need to add tuna..........

#20 luv2increase

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Posted 25 June 2008 - 11:09 PM

I eat 5 hard boiled, cage-free, organic eggs daily at one sitting. I think hard boiling them doesn't denature them as much as actually cooking the eggs on a skillet. Also, you don't have to worry about getting nasty bacteria that could cause disease from the raw egg.

#21 nightlight

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 12:11 AM

i couldn't ever eat raw eggs like that, the taste of them cooked is just too good


Yolks plus a spoon of sugar or honey per yolk, whipped with a fork for few minutes into a smoth cream are more delicious than any pastry filling or cake icing you have likely ever tasted (except perhaps, in few Vienna or Paris pastry shops).

#22 Shepard

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 04:04 AM

>>> There is one imperfection (at least) in eating raw egg whites: avidin, which binds biotin.

But the yolk contains biotin. Nature is smart, ISTM.


But is it enough biotin to overcome the amount bound by avidin?

#23 Guest_Isochroma_*

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 04:11 AM

who knows... but i do know that the white contains lots of pro-allergenic proteins, so there's more than the avidin issue in favor of avoiding it. It provides few nutrients yet represents about 2/3 of the egg's volume, thus 2/3 of its infection risk (salmonella, etc.). Benefit/risk ratio is too low to bother, for me anyway.

Plus it has no flavor, which is the last straw. It pours nicely down the drain, no clogs guaranteed!

Edited by Isochroma, 26 June 2008 - 04:13 AM.


#24 mike250

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 06:15 AM

was considering the raw egg yolks but what are the chances of salmonella poisoning. Currently I soft-boil whole eggs.

#25 Guest_Isochroma_*

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 08:10 AM

soft boiling won't kill salmonella in the yolk anyway, but it is useful if you want the white

#26 mike250

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 09:48 AM

soft boiling won't kill salmonella in the yolk anyway, but it is useful if you want the white


what are the chances of posioning from those egg yolks in that case?

Edited by mike250, 26 June 2008 - 09:56 AM.


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#27 Guest_Isochroma_*

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 04:06 PM

miniscule




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