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Interview With Liz Parrish - BioViva

bioviva liz parrish myostatin inhibitor

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#1 Mind

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Posted 24 January 2016 - 08:52 PM


Coming up during the 2nd week of February, I will be interviewing Liz Parrish, the CEO of BioViva.

 

BioViva homepage: http://bioviva-science.com/

 

In 2015 Liz Parrish of BioViva became one of the first people to attempt gene therapy - on herself. The experiment is an attempt to lengthen telomeres. In addition to the gene therapy to increase telomerase, she also took a myostatin inhibitor.

 

Read more about it here: https://www.fightagi...-activation.php

 

Please post questions in this thread ahead of time and I will ask them during the interview/podcast.

 

 

Attached Files


Edited by Mind, 05 February 2016 - 10:29 PM.

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#2 michael0505

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Posted 24 January 2016 - 10:20 PM

What visible physical changes that pertain to aging reversal from the Telomerase therapy does she expect to see  *separate from the expected Myostatin result therapy result*



#3 sthira

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Posted 24 January 2016 - 10:33 PM

Why did you choose to administer the two therapies simultaneously? Why not one by one so we might have better ideas about which one therapy might be doing what?

You've said you don't want to comment about what you're specifically feeling because describing what you think you're feeling might be confused with placebo. For grins and giggles, forget placebo for a moment. Tell us with specifics what you tell yourself you're feeling and noticing about your experience.

Edited by sthira, 24 January 2016 - 10:36 PM.

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#4 zorba990

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Posted 24 January 2016 - 11:26 PM

Have you considered a treatment that would activate the gene for the enzyme gulonolactone oxidase? I believe this would solve a number of issues.

https://www.lewrockw...we-live-longer/

"Mammals who make their own vitamin C can live 8-10 times beyond their age of physical maturity. Mammals without this ability have a difficult time reaching 3-4 times. Researchers believe the reinstallation of the gulonolactone oxidase enzyme in humans would extend the lifespan to hundreds of years."

In descriptions of your treatments, there is the notion of one virus infecting one cell, yielding, of course, temporary results. Is there a way to make thre treatment more traditionally viral? I understand the financial disincentive of this, but a cure for aging seem to require that type of permanent change (as opposed to an ongoing treatment, that might, of course, be safer)
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#5 niner

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Posted 25 January 2016 - 01:56 AM

I'm not interested in anything subjective, like "feelings of well-being", or in physical appearance unless it's something quantifiable.  For example, dermatology labs can measure surface roughness of skin, transepithelial water loss, things like that would be interesting, but "people tell me I look younger" isn't.  We know that Liz is doing a ton of clinical and lab tests before and after, and it would be really cool to learn what tests they are (would she be willing to post a list of them somewhere?) and if they've shown any change yet.


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#6 corb

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Posted 25 January 2016 - 06:37 AM

I'm with niner. I'd like to know what tests she's doing and the results.

If she's not willing to share the results at the moment she could at least give us an outline of the tests.


Edited by corb, 25 January 2016 - 06:45 AM.

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#7 sthira

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Posted 25 January 2016 - 02:00 PM

She's already said she's had baseline blood and several other tests before undergoing the two therapies. So you all want before and four-month later after numbers?
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#8 corb

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Posted 25 January 2016 - 04:27 PM

She's already said she's had baseline blood and several other tests before undergoing the two therapies. So you all want before and four-month later after numbers?

 

I'm honestly not all that interested in the blood panel, almost nothing related to telomere length can be gotten out of that.

I think a liver biopsy before and after would have been the best for this kind of study because AAV supposedly accumulates in the liver when given intravenously, so I suppose the liver will have the highest level of transfection.

 

As for any signs of improvement of function I don't know what would've been the best test, I'm curious as to what was chosen. The results are more or less a secondary at this point for me, but still if she wants to disclose some results I'd love to hear those as well. ;)


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#9 resveratrol_guy

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Posted 26 January 2016 - 01:36 AM

Thanks for your public service, Liz. Here are some questions for you:

 

1. Given the risk and expense of performing multiple craniotomies in order to turn on TERT in the hippocampus, then it seems reasonable and only slightly riskier to transfect as much of the brain as possible. Why not broaden your Alzheimer's therapy to maximize the number of transfected neurons within the practical limitations of craniotomy? At least, AAVs could be released along the entire injection pathway during needle withdrawal, instead of exclusively at the deepest injection point. It also seems prudent to simply inject AAVs into the CSF and allow them to migrate. What do you think?

 

2. In your latest interview with Nikola Danaylov, you mentioned that animals with TERT therapy had larger brains for their age cohort. Was this systemically delivered or intracranially delivered therapy? And was the larger brain size due to slower atrophy or frank neuroregeneration?

 

3. People with Laron syndrome have extremely low rates of cancer according to a study of Ecuadoreans with the condition. Consequently, it seems imperative that cancer patients be given the option to try to shut down IGF1 production in order to halt metastatis. What are your thoughts on this?

 


Edited by resveratrol_guy, 26 January 2016 - 01:39 AM.

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#10 Mind

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Posted 26 January 2016 - 07:39 PM

Great questions so far. I think we will be able to get some new information on this subject, even though Ms. Parrish has given many interviews already.


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#11 corb

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Posted 28 January 2016 - 04:17 PM

I have another question.
What does Parish think about http://www.longecity...-tumor-vaccine/.

If vaccines like this one become the norm wouldn't telomere lengthening through TERT become impossible in the general public?


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#12 alc

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Posted 31 January 2016 - 01:49 PM

Here are y questions:

 

1. There are many people around the web that are contesting you did

do these two gene therapies. Can you please clarify, if there is a way

to prove you did it, so people will stop arguing about this?

 

2. Are there going to be anytime soon "patient 1", "patient 2", "patient 3", etc. ? We are

very interested to hear a "follow up" story and see people that are taking the same gene therapy, but

that such patients are much older than

you. So any beneficial results from these therapies will be much more visible.

 

3. Dr. Jason William is a contested figure in the Stem Cell world.

Please see the article below:

 

http://www.scribd.co...cision-StemCell

 

Can you please explain briefly about these issues?

 

4. Lately there are quite few gene therapies that are being

tested in various diseases. Are you looking to add soon new gene

therapies to the two you did?

 

5. George Church in one of his interviews, said that "actually one of his

students can prepare the materials in couple days in the lab", referring to

two gene therapies that you did. Why would be the cost of such treatment "hundreds

of thousands of dollars" as you mentioned in the recent Singularity interview?

 

6. Do you consider the "cosmetic" effect (aka Hollywood effect) of such therapies?

Meaning, even these gene therapies won't reverse aging to vital organs, if they

do the "visual trick" for skin, muscle, hair (overall look) and reverse a person's

look to a more youthful state, this

will be a gold mine that can provide a lot of funds for your company to fund other

research that can quickly advance into real rejuvenation.

 

Thank you for you time, good luck with the gene therapy work.

We are all looking

forward to good results from your gene therapy and hopefully see the first clear results

of reverse some forms of aging in humans!

 


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#13 Limitless

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Posted 04 March 2016 - 02:23 AM

Wow, has it ever been a long time since I last posted on this site. I was wondering Mind if this interview with Liz Parrish has happened yet?


Edited by Limitless, 04 March 2016 - 02:26 AM.

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#14 Mind

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Posted 15 March 2016 - 05:00 PM

File Name: Liz_Parrish_LongeCity_Now2016

File Submitter: Mind

File Submitted: 15 Mar 2016

File Category: Podcasts

Guest: Liz Parrish


In this episode of LongeCity Now we hear from one of the founders of BioViva, Liz Parrish, who has performed an experimental gene therapy upon herself. Find out more about the experiment and her views on life extension.


Click here to download this file


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#15 Mind

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Posted 15 March 2016 - 05:15 PM

Thanks for being patient with this one. It is a good listen as Ms. Parrish is a good communicator about life extension topics. I tried to get a little more detail on the experimental therapy (most of the questions asked in this discussion), but as she has stated in previous interviews, and this one, she is not the lead scientist in this effort, only the patient, so she is not always able to provide the level of detail that some of us are asking for.


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#16 sthira

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Posted 16 March 2016 - 04:47 AM

Great interview and comments, Mind. And I'm sure we all agree with your end comments that we need "fewer headlines and more concrete results." I'm so tired of seeing the words "breakthrough" and "landmark" and "revolutionary new science..." Enough hype.

As Parrish said, medical technology has been held up for far too long. And why experimental treatments aren't allowed on suffering people who are going to die soon anyway is ludicrous.
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#17 Ben

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Posted 28 May 2016 - 08:28 AM

Mind, this is the best interview yet. Thank you. Very exciting.


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