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ImmInst Film transcript (result thread)


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#1 Matthias

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Posted 04 March 2006 - 04:21 AM


One of our topics on the Agenda 2006 is "transcript of all spoken text in the imminst-film".

There are 162 parts in the ImmInst-Film identified by a part-ID. Each part has got a length of some seconds. A table of the parts and their part-IDs is shown below.

If you want to help create this transcript, please

1.) Add a new post right here in this topic

2.) Write nothing but one (or more) part-IDs in that new post.
You don't have to write the transcript for this part immediately.
Just write your part-ID (or part-IDs), so others know you will write this part (or these parts) sooner or later. (This will avoid double work)

  • If you are the first, start with part-ID 001
  • If you are not the first, start with the last part-ID your predecessor took - increased by one.

3.) View the ImmInst-Film on your DVD or the google-video here: http://www.imminst.org/film.php or directly at http://video.google....=imminst&time=0

4.) The time-position your part starts with is shown in the tables below

  • The dvd is divided in 10 "titles". Some programs start a "local" timer at 0:00:01 for each of the 10 titles
  • Others (e.g. the google-video) have a "global" timer from 0:00:01 to 1:45:32

5.) Listen carefully and write down your part

  • if you don't recognize some words clearly, no problem: just write some ????? in the text and go ahead.

6.) Return to this topic and EDIT your own post by completing it with your text


For questions about the proceeding, problems and discussions about the transcript we have this extra-topic:


When the transcript of all 162 parts is complete, we can check the correctness of the result in a similar "massively distributed" way.

Thank you for your help!





After the transcript is finished, the next steps are the translations:

Edited by Matthias, 31 March 2007 - 06:28 PM.


#2 Matthias

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Posted 04 March 2006 - 04:53 AM


DVD-title 1




part-ID local- global-
start start


001 0:00:01 0:00:01 1. narrator-A: Introduction
(Theresa Ravese Blinder)


002 0:02:32 0:02:33 1. Sonia Arrison
(Director of Technology Studies,
Pacific Research Institute)


003 0:02:46 0:02:46 1. Michael Roy Ames
(Pres. Singularity Institute for
Artificial Intelligence, Canada)


004 0:03:00 0:03:00 1. Susan Fonseca-Klein
(Director, Immortality Institute)


005 0:03:15 0:03:15 1. Aubrey de Grey, Ph.D.
(Anti-aging resercher, University of
Cambridge, England, Dept. of Genetics)


006 0:03:39 0:03:39 1. Stephen L. Coles, M.D., Ph.D.
(Director, Los Angeles Gerontology
Reserch Group)


007 0:03:55 0:03:55 1. Michael Cooper, Ph.D.
(Genetics of aging researcher, Southern
Methodist University, Dallas, TX)


008 0:04:46 0:04:46 1. Robert Bradbury
(Founder, Aeiveos Corporation, dedicated
to understanding the causes of aging)


009 0:05:14 0:05:14 1. Joao Pedro de Magalhaes, Ph.D.
(Harvard Medical School, microbiologist
working on the biology of aging)


010 0:05:25 0:05:25 1. David Kekich
(CEO, Maximum Life Foundation, accelerating
progress in anti-aging medicine research)


011 0:05:55 0:05:55 1. Ben Goertzel, Ph.D.
(CEO of Biomind LLC and Novamente LLC, applied
artificial intelligence to biotechnology)


012 0:06:17 0:06:17 1. Antonei Csoka, Ph.D.
(University of Pittsburgh, helped find the
genetic cause for Progeria, aging disease)


013 0:06:32 0:06:32 1. Jay Fox
(Director, Immortality Institute for
Infinite Lifespans)


014 0:07:13 0:07:13 1. James J. Hughes Ph.D.
(Director, Institute for Ethics and
Emerging Technologies)


015 0:07:56 0:07:56 1. Randy Wicker
(Activist, entrepreneur and public
relations pioneer)


016 0:08:40 0:08:40 1. Martine Rothblatt, Ph.D.
(CEO, United Therapeutics, Founder,
Teresem Movement Foundation)


017 0:09:26 0:09:26 1. Charles Platt
(Suspended Animation Inc., former president
of CryoCare Foundation)


018 0:10:03 0:10:03 1. Peter A. Passaro
(Scientist in the fields of neuroengineering
and neural dynamics)


019 0:10:24 0:10:24 1. David S. Pizer
(Former Alcor Vice President, owner of the
Creekside Preserve/Ventureville)


020 0:11:00 0:11:00 1. Kenneth X. Sills
(Director, Immortality Institute)


021 0:11:17 0:11:17 2. narrator-A: Life Extension Foundation


022 0:11:30 0:11:30 1. William Faloon
(Director, Life Extension Foundation,
www.lef.org)


0:11:58 0:11:58

Edited by Matthias, 11 March 2006 - 01:34 PM.


#3 Matthias

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Posted 04 March 2006 - 05:08 AM


DVD-title 2




part-ID local- global-
start start


023 0:00:01 0:11:58 <<<<< Aging ? >>>>>
3. narrator-A: about aging


024 0:00:18 0:12:17 1. Christopher B. Heward, Ph.D.
(Pres. Kronos Science Laboratories, Inc.
Optimal Health Company)


025 0:01:04 0:13:02 2. Joao Pedro de Magalhaes, Ph.D.


026 0:01:34 0:13:32 2. Stephen L. Coles, M.D., Ph.D.


027 0:01:52 0:13:50 2. Antonei Csoka, Ph.D.


028 0:03:14 0:15:11 2. Ben Goertzel, Ph.D.


029 0:03:53 0:15:52 4. narrator-A: about Dr. Rose


030 0:04:17 0:16:16 1. Michael R. Rose, Ph.D.
(Professor in the Department of Ecology &
Evolutionary Biology; Univ. of CA. Irvine)


031 0:07:22 0:19:20 <<<<< Caloric Restriction >>>>>
2. William Faloon


032 0:07:35 0:19:34 1. Peter Voss
(Founder, Adaptive A.I. Inc)


033 0:08:07 0:20:05 2. Robert Bradbury


034 0:08:29 0:20:27 1. Louise Gold
(CFO, Adaptive A.I. Inc)


035 0:08:40 0:20:38 3. Ben Goertzel, Ph.D.


036 0:09:07 0:21:05 3. Joao Pedro de Magalhaes, Ph.D.


037 0:09:23 0:21:21 5. narrator-A: about Dr. Aubrey de Grey


038 0:09:34 0:21:32 2. Aubrey de Grey, Ph.D.


039 0:09:57 0:21:55 4. Joao Pedro de Magalhaes, Ph.D.


040 0:10:41 0:22:39 4. Ben Goertzel, Ph.D.


041 0:11:19 0:23:17 2. David Kekich


042 0:12:16 0:24:14 1. Ben Best
(President, Cryonics Institute,
Clinton Township, Michigan)


043 0:12:28 0:24:27 1. Rafal Smigrodzki, M.D., Ph.D.
(University of Virginia, Dept. of Neurology,
research focus is on mitochondrial function)


044 0:13:10 0:25:08 3. William Faloon


0:14:04 0:26:04

Edited by Matthias, 11 March 2006 - 01:41 PM.


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#4 Matthias

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Posted 04 March 2006 - 05:09 AM


DVD-title 3




part-ID local- global-
start start


045 0:00:01 0:26:04 <<<<< Deathism >>>>>
6. narrator-A: about deathism


046 0:01:03 0:27:03 1. Max More, Ph.D.
(Founder, Extropy Institute)


047 0:01:49 0:27:52 1. James Dale
(Genetic Researcher)


048 0:02:12 0:28:14 2. Rafal Smigrodzki, M.D., Ph.D.


049 0:03:43 0:29:45 1. William Hurlbut, Ph.D.
(President's Council on Bioethics)


050 0:04:58 0:31:00 3. Rafal Smigrodzki, M.D., Ph.D.


051 0:05:20 0:31:22 2. William Hurlbut, Ph.D.


052 0:05:33 0:31:44 1. Natasha Vita-More


053 0:07:48 0:33:49 <<<<< The FDA >>>>>
4. William Faloon


054 0:09:39 0:35:41 7. narrator-A: some statements about Life Extension


0:10:28 0:36:30


#5 Matthias

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Posted 04 March 2006 - 05:10 AM


DVD-title 4




part-ID local- global-
start start


055 0:00:01 0:36:30 8. narrator-A: about Vladimir Nabokov


056 0:00:41 0:37:11 <<<<< Oblivion ? >>>>>
1. Eliezer Yudkowsky
(Research Fellow, Singularity Institute For
Artificial Intelligence)


057 0:01:04 0:37:33 1. Rudi Hoffman, CFP
(Certified Financial Planner)


058 0:01:34 0:38:02 1. Shannon Vyff
(Cryonicist, Immortality Institute Member)


059 0:01:55 0:38:24 1. Kennita Watson
(Cryonicist, Libertarian and Extropian)


060 0:02:28 0:38:58 2. Sonia Arrison


061 0:03:20 0:39:50 2. James Dale


062 0:03:53 0:40:23 5. William Faloon


063 0:04:25 0:40:55 1. James Halperin
(Author: The First Immortal)


064 0:04:59 0:41:28 5. Joao Pedro de Magalhaes, Ph.D.


065 0:05:07 0:41:37 3. David Kekich


066 0:05:35 0:42:04 2. Martine Rothblatt, Ph.D.


067 0:06:09 0:42:38 4. Rafal Smigrodzki, M.D., Ph.D.


068 0:07:23 0:43:53 2. Max More, Ph.D.


0:08:20 0:44:50


#6 Matthias

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Posted 04 March 2006 - 05:10 AM


DVD-title 5




part-ID local- global-
start start


069 0:00:01 0:44:50 <<<<< Natural ? >>>>>
9. narrator-A: about 'natural?'


070 0:00:29 0:45:18 2. Natasha Vita-More
(President of Extropy Institut,e Cultural
strategist and designer)


071 0:00:40 0:45:29 1. Joseph Waynick
(CEO, Alcor Life Extension Foundation,
Scottsdale, Arizona)


072 0:01:31 0:46:21 5. Rafal Smigrodzki, M.D., Ph.D.


073 0:01:57 0:46:46 2. Kennita Watson


074 0:02:25 0:47:12 <<<<< Over-Population >>>>>
4. David Kekich


075 0:03:16 0:48:03 3. Max More, Ph.D.


076 0:04:14 0:49:01 3. James Dale


077 0:04:35 0:49:25 1. William Wiser
(Life Extension Consultant)


078 0:05:02 0:49:51 1. Reason
(Founder, LogevityMeme.org)


079 0:05:33 0:50:21 <<<<< Religion ? >>>>>
3. Sonia Arrison


080 0:06:57 0:51:45 <<<<< Boredom ? >>>>>
1. Matthew Sullivan
(Patient care manager, Alcor Life Extension
Foundation, Scottsdale, Arizona)


081 0:07:29 0:52:18 <<<<< The Rich ? >>>>>
3. Aubrey de Grey, Ph.D.


082 0:07:48 0:52:37 1. Michael D. Hartel, Ph.D.
(Physicists, Harvard)


083 0:08:33 0:53:22 4. James Dale


0:09:01 0:53:52


#7 Matthias

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Posted 04 March 2006 - 05:11 AM


DVD-title 6




part-ID local- global-
start start


084 0:00:01 0:53:52 10. narrator-A: about Benjamin Franklin
<<<<< Cryonics >>>>>


085 0:01:13 0:55:06 2. James Halperin


086 0:01:32 0:55:24 1. Don Laughlin
(Founder, Riverside Hotel & Casino Resort
Laughlin, Nevada)


087 0:01:58 0:55:50 1. Ralph Merkle, Ph.D.
(Director, Alcor Life Extension Foundation,
nanotechnology researcher)


088 0:02:17 0:56:10 1. John Grigg
(Manager, Creekside Preserve Lodge,
Advisor & Sec., Society for Venturism)


089 0:02:39 0:56:32 2. Michael D. Hartel, Ph.D.


090 0:03:41 0:57:34 1. Robin Dale Hanson, Ph.D.
(Associate Professor of Economics,
George Mason University)


091 0:04:07 0:57:59 2. Matthew Sullivan


092 0:04:30 0:58:22 1. Lorrie Hull Smithers, Ph.D.
(Member, Alcor Life Extension Foundation)


093 0:05:11 0:59:02 1. Jay Wasserlauf
(Suspended Animation Inc.)


094 0:05:28 0:59:20 1. Tanya Jones
(Director, Alcor Life Extension Foundation,
Scottsdale, Arizona)


095 0:05:52 0:59:43 2. David S. Pizer


096 0:06:26 1:00:18 2. Ralph Merkle, Ph.D.


097 0:07:25 1:01:16 11. narrator-A: about Robert Ettinger


098 0:07:37 1:01:29 1. Robert Ettinger
(Father of Cryonics)


099 0:09:10 1:03:02 2. Ben Best


100 0:09:32 1:03:24 1. Andy Zawacki
(Manager, Cryonics Institute,
Clinton Township, Michigan)


101 0:09:59 1:03:51 3. David S. Pizer


102 0:10:36 1:04:29 12. narrator-A: about Rudi Hoffman


103 0:10:44 1:04:37 2. Rudi Hoffman, CFP


104 0:11:09 1:05:01 2. Joseph Waynick


105 0:11:32 1:05:24 13. narrator-A: about Brian Wowk


106 0:11:44 1:05:35 1. Brian Wowk, Ph.D.
(physicist and senior scientist at
21st Century Medicine, Inc.)


107 0:12:39 1:06:32 14. narrator-A: about Charles Platt


108 0:12:52 1:06:44 2. Charles Platt


109 0:14:09 1:08:02 6. Rafal Smigrodzki, M.D., Ph.D.


110 0:15:03 1:08:55 15. narrator-A: about James Swayze


111 0:15:19 1:09:10 1. James Swayze
(Member of the Cryonics Institute)


0:17:08 1:11:01


#8 Matthias

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Posted 04 March 2006 - 05:12 AM


DVD-title 7




part-ID local- global-
start start


112 0:00:01 1:11:01 <<<<< Mprize.org >>>>>
5. David Kekich


113 0:00:38 1:11:39 2. Jay Fox


114 0:01:44 1:12:45 4. Aubrey de Grey, Ph.D.


115 0:02:30 1:13:30 <<<<< Life Extension >>>>>
16. narrator-A: about Life Extension


116 0:02:37 1:13:37 2. Robin Dale Hanson, Ph.D.


117 0:02:53 1:13:53 2. Eliezer Yudkowsky


118 0:03:17 1:14:17 2. Robert Ettinger


119 0:03:51 1:14:51 3. Charles Platt


120 0:04:39 1:15:39 4. Sonia Arrison


121 0:05:02 1:16:02 6. Joao Pedro de Magalhaes, Ph.D.


122 0:05:14 1:16:14 2. Reason


123 0:06:00 1:17:01 5. Ben Goertzel, Ph.D.


0:06:26 1:17:28


#9 Matthias

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Posted 04 March 2006 - 05:12 AM


DVD-title 8




part-ID local- global-
start start


124 0:00:01 1:17:28 <<<<< Artificial Intelligence >>>>>
1. James Canton, Ph.D.
(Pres. Institute For Global Futures)


125 0:00:53 1:18:20 6. William Faloon


126 0:01:59 1:19:26 6. Ben Goertzel, Ph.D.


127 0:02:48 1:20:15 2. Peter Passaro


128 0:03:32 1:20:58 <<<<< Productive Nanosystems >>>>>
(from molecules to superproducts v1.01)
(Mark Sims, CEO of Nanorex inc.)
1. narrator-B (Suzann Kale)


129 0:08:22 1:25:48 <<<<< Nanomedicine >>>>>
17. narrator-A: about nanomedicine


130 0:08:35 1:26:01 1. Christine Peterson
(Founder, VP, Forseight Nanotech Inst.)


131 0:08:57 1:26:23 18. narrator-A: about Robert Freitas


132 0:09:23 1:26:49 3. Robert Bradbury


133 0:09:39 1:27:05 1. J.M. Salgado
(Founder, Project Life)


134 0:09:46 1:27:12 4. Robert Bradbury


135 0:09:55 1:27:21 <<<<< Julian Huxley (1887-1975) >>>>>
2. James J. Hughes Ph.D.


136 0:10:20 1:27:46 19. narrator-A: about Transhumanism


137 0:10:33 1:28:00 3. Rudi Hoffman, CFP


138 0:11:44 1:29:10 20. narrator-A: about FM2030 (1930-2000)


139 0:11:59 1:29:25 1. Gustavo Faigenbaum
(Member, Immortality Institute)


140 0:13:14 1:30:41 <<<<< Singularity >>>>>
21. narrator-A: about singularity


141 0:13:33 1:31:00 2. William Wiser


142 0:13:41 1:31:08 1. John Smart
(Pres. Acceleration Studies Foundation)


143 0:14:16 1:31:42 3. Eliezer Yudkowsky


144 0:14:46 1:32:13 7. Rafal Smigrodzki, M.D., Ph.D.


145 0:15:04 1:32:31 4. Max More, Ph.D.


146 0:15:58 1:33:24 <<<<< Singularity is near >>>>>
22. narrator-A: about Ray Kurzweil


147 0:16:25 1:33:52 3. Matthew Sullivan


0:17:15 1:34:44


#10 Matthias

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Posted 04 March 2006 - 05:13 AM


DVD-title 9




part-ID local- global-
start start


148 0:00:01 1:34:44 23. narrator-A: about Immortality


149 0:00:28 1:35:11 3. Robert Ettinger


150 0:00:51 1:35:35 7. Joao Pedro de Magalhaes, Ph.D.


151 0:01:15 1:35:59 3. Robin Dale Hanson, Ph.D.


152 0:02:00 1:36:45 1. Jerome C. Glenn
(Executive Director, American Council for the
United Nations University)


153 0:02:58 1:37:43 2. Shannon Vyff


154 0:03:45 1:38:29 24. narrator-A: about Igor Vladimirovich Vishev,
Ph.D. and Nikolai Fedorovich Fedorov 1829-1903


155 0:04:15 1:38:58 1. narrator-C: Igor Vishev interview
(read by Danila Medvedev)


156 0:04:53 1:39:36 <<<<< The Immortality Institute >>>>>
3. Jay Fox


157 0:05:31 1:40:14 2. Susan Fonseca-Klein


158 0:06:12 1:40:55 2. Gustavo Faigenbaum


159 0:06:36 1:41:20 2. Randy Wicker


0:06:57 1:41:42


#11 Matthias

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Posted 04 March 2006 - 05:14 AM


DVD-title 10




part-ID local- global-
start start


160 0:00:01 1:41:42 <<<<< Conclusion >>>>>
1. Philip Van Nedervelde
(CEO Founder E-spaces; Director, Foresight
Institute Europe; transhumanist entrepeneur)


161 0:00:51 1:42:32 1. Adi Berman
(Ice becomes fire)


162 0:01:27 1:43:08 1. credits


0:03:50 1:45:32


#12 Matthias

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Posted 05 March 2006 - 11:51 AM

Part-ID 001 / Introduction

start 0:00:01 / 0:00:01

0:00:01.000
The desire to overcome death is nothing new. The 'Epic of Gilgamesh' - the first recorded story of human history - accounts on clay tablets a mythical kings quest for immortality. 4000 years later humans are still searching for immortality. With the modernization of haelth care encouraged by biotechnology and computer science, remarkable gains have been made in extending human life spans.

A child born today can expect to live more than three times longer than in the time of Gilgamesh. Stemm cells, caloric restriction, cryonics, nanotechnology and transhumanism have become the watchwords of our aera. Perhaps with the accumulation of these accelerating advancements we are indeed on the verge of a complete reversal of the biological aging process - regenerative medicine in our lifetimes.

And if so, if we are able to overcome aging and then live forever, what will this mean for religion? What will this mean for governments and social systems, which rely on a noble and timely death?

Perhaps once we have conquered aging, we'll no longer even wish to stay as vulnerable humans.
Perhaps we'll expedite our progression from immortal beings into cyborgs and then to completely post-human entities.

But now there are more pressing questions: What about the environment, oppression by the wealthy over the poor,
the problem of overpopulation? What about boredom with a life that stretches out forever and even more harmoneous:
What if the universe would end itself in a 'wimper', a long expanding heat death into the infinite.

If so, what's the point in trying to live forever anyway? Well, it's impossible to answer all of these questions within one documentary. We can provide a glimps, a brief snapshot in time from the voices of the visionaries of the forefront. Join us as we take this amazing journey. "Exploring Life Extension", an Immortality Institute film

[ Exploring Life Extension ]
[ Writer/Director ]
[ Bruce Klein ]
[ ImmInst.org Immortality Institute ]
[ Major Financial Support Provided by ]
[ Alcor Life Extension Foundation ]
[ cartmell holdings ]
[ Book: James L. Halperin - The First Immortal ]
[ Life Extension Foundation ]
[ Maximum Life Foundation ]
[ Terasem Movement ]

stop 0:02:33 / 0:02:33

Edited by Matthias, 02 April 2007 - 07:51 PM.


#13 Matthias

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Posted 05 March 2006 - 01:17 PM

Part-ID 002 / Sonia Arrison (Director of Technology Studies, Pacific Research Institute)

Posted Image

start 0:02:33 / 0:02:33
0:02:33.000
I think there is a lot of things that I want to do and I don't think I would ever get bored. I really value life. I love life and I don't want it to end. Ever.
stop 0:02:46 / 0:02:46

Edited by Matthias, 22 March 2009 - 02:12 AM.


#14 Live Forever

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Posted 05 March 2006 - 01:24 PM

Part-ID 003 / Michael Roy Ames (President, Singularity Institute for Artificial Intelligence, Canada)

Posted Image

start 0:02:46 / 0:02:46
I don't want to put a limit on the number of years, or centuries, or millennia that I want to live. Um, there may come a time in my life where I don’t want to live anymore, but that’s not right now. I don’t want to have a limit.
stop 0:03:00 / 0:03:00

Edited by Matthias, 22 March 2009 - 02:13 AM.


#15 Live Forever

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Posted 05 March 2006 - 01:34 PM

Part-ID 004 Susan Fonseca-Klein (Director, Immortality Institute)

Posted Image

Start 0:03:00 / 0:03:00
At some point humans would be able to take care of all of our medical problems. I just never thought it would be possible in my lifetime, and now for the first time I am seriously thinking it could be possible in my lifetime.
End 0:03:15 / 0:03:15


Part-ID 005 Aubrey de Grey, Ph.D. (Anti-aging researcher, University of Cambridge, England, Dept. of Genetics)

Posted Image

Start 0:03:15 / 0:03:15
Purely induced chance, really, that where we have convinced ourselves of this absurdity that aging is a good thing, .., you know that’s all related to chance. It’s my job to wake people up, and the only real way to do it is to present real actual factual information. In other words, to develop, to do experimental work in the laboratory that shows incontrovertibly that aging can be very dramatically altered.
End 0:03:39 / 0:03:39


Part-ID 006 Stephen L. Coles, M.D., Ph.D. (Director, Los Angeles Gerontology Research Group)

Posted Image

Start 0:03:39 / 0:03:39
The oldest person in the world that we know of who has been documented by the Guinness Book of Records is named Jeanne Calment, a French lady who died at the age of a hundred-twenty two in the year 1997.
End 0:03:55 / 0:03:55


Part-ID 007 Michael Cooper, Ph.D. (Genetics of aging researcher, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX)

Posted Image

Start 0:03:55 / 0:03:55
But, we see now that we have tools to take the problem, and if we fail to do so we are going to die, and the next generation, or the next generation after that will wake up and see it, you know. They will be the benefitters, and the burden is upon us, the people that know, you and I that know. You know, we have a responsibility because we know. The average citizen, or the average population, don’t know what we know and so they don’t have that responsibility. But, we need to, you know, we need to enlighten enough people to make an effect where we can benefit ourselves and all the people we care about.
End 0:04:46 / 0:04:46

Edited by Matthias, 22 March 2009 - 02:14 AM.


#16 Live Forever

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Posted 05 March 2006 - 02:08 PM

Part-ID 008 Robert Bradbury (Founder, Aeiveos Corporation, dedicated to understanding the causes of aging)

Posted Image

start 0:04:46 / 0:04:46
Well, you may hit eighty-five or ninety, you know, .. and if we push everyone out to that level. Well lets see, I am forty-eight now, if I can get to eighty, you know that’s another thirty years, and that pushes me to 2034, and if we don’t have robust, you know pretty robust stem cell technology and beginning nanotechnology by 2034, I would be very, very surprised.
stop 0:05:14 / 0:05:14


Part-ID 009 Joao Pedro de Magalhaes, Ph.D. (Harvard Medical School, Microbiologist working on the biology of aging)

Posted Image

start 0:05:14 / 0:05:14
I love to live, and I want to live more. I don’t think there is anything else after that, so this is my motivation for working on aging research.
stop 0:05:25 / 0:05:25


Part-ID 010 David Kekich (CEO, Maximum Life Foundation, accelerating progress in anti-aging medicine research)

Posted Image

start 0:05:25 / 0:05:25
This is where technology has an interface with your body, with the human body, and .. we’ve got stints in our hearts and we take all these things for granted. Now we’re implanting contact lenses and doing laser surgery, these are all things that seemed real radical at one time. Now, like you said, heart pacemakers or artificial hearts, they have just become, at first big news, second, something everybody wants if they need them, and third, something everyone takes for granted after they get them, or once they’ve had them for awhile.
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Part-ID 011 Ben Goertzel, Ph.D. (CEO of Biomind LLC and Novamente LLC, applied artificial intelligence to biotechnology)

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It’s very frustrating to know these super rich super heroes who have decided to focus on what’s really long term importance to the human race and to intelligence on earth. Which, in my view are the two most important things to work on are probably the human life extension and artificial intelligence.
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Part-ID 012 Antonei Csoka, Ph.D. (University of Pittsburgh, helped find the genetic cause for Progeria, aging disease)

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I tend to think that, like, this century is like the gateway century. By that, I mean, that like this century we will either destroy ourselves this century or we will attain immortality.
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Part-ID 013 Jay Fox (Director, Immortality Institute for Infinite Lifespans)

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It’s the rational part of my mind against the part of my mind that truly wants to believe in an afterlife. To know that if there’s nothing afterwards, what does that mean for me? And, it makes it worth, that doubt makes it worth doing everything I can to make sure that I and others that are unsure have an opportunity to live as long as possible. And, if we can live just enough, just make it long enough, I believe that technology will advance enough so that some few lucky of us will never have to die.
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Part-ID 014 James J. Hughes Ph.D. (Director, Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies)

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It’s not a matter of whether there will never be life extension, because I don’t think that they will ever be able to forbid life extension. It’s a matter of how aggressively we pursue it, and I think Nick Bostrom’s recent fable of the dragon puts this very clearly. If you see that there will be a time when negligible senescence or delayed aging is possible, and you see a time when all of the diseases which kill people today can be cured, then its not a matter of gee, this future is never going to get here. Its all these people are going to die unnecessarily, and if we get it here twenty years sooner, all these people will be saved.
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Edited by Matthias, 05 August 2007 - 07:52 PM.


#17 Bruce Klein

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Posted 05 March 2006 - 02:18 PM

Beautiful work, Matthias & liveforever22!

#18 Live Forever

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Posted 06 March 2006 - 03:11 PM

Part-ID 015 Randy Wicker(Activist, entrepreneur and public relations pioneer)

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You have to raise the legitimacy. We had done over 10 or 15 years had brought up homosexuality and made it a legitimate topic for discussion, and I think that’s what’s going on now with the immortality issue. It’s that here and there they are getting coherent people, or people of increasing stature coming out and saying, why not? Why shouldn’t we try to have extreme life extension? Somehow when you say “immortality”, remember that the Greek gods were called “the immortals”, so in a way when you start saying you are an immoralist, its almost like saying you’re a god. You’re claiming to be God! You know, wow, talk about blasphemy big time.
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Part-ID 016 Martine Rothblatt, Ph.D. (CEO, United Therapeutics, Founder, Teresem Movement Foundation)

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Mainstream phraseology of life extension, and life extension is a mainstreamable version of immortality. “Immortality” is just not polite in mixed company, to use that word, because it evokes to people, either anti-godliness, or it evokes to people a kind of a bravado of one thinks that they are a god. In fact, in my experience, immortalists don’t think of themselves of gods at all, they think of themselves as mere mortals who want to enjoy learning and loving forever and that’s all I think immortalists think of immortality, they don’t get into all the other definitions.
stop 0:09:26 / 0:09:26


Part-ID 017 Charles Platt(Suspended Animation Inc., former president of CryoCare Foundation)

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If you ask a medical professional now, “When is someone dead?”, they will say, “Well no pulse, no respiration, no brain activity”. Then you say, “But you resuscitate people from that condition all the time, don’t you?”. “Well, yes we do.” Well then they couldn’t have been dead. No they weren’t cause they weren’t pronounced legally dead. So, it’s just a legal fiction as far as I’m concerned, but it is very useful, because once that pronouncement has been made, a legal line has been crossed allowing us to intervene using our own equipment, our own medications.
stop 0:10:03 / 0:10:03


Part-ID 018 Peter A. Passaro (Scientist in the fields of neuroengineering and neural dynamics)

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I don’t think in terms of, How long do I want to live? Just, How long can I live? I’m not quite as far towards the idea of, I don’t think I am an absolutist, an immortalist. I’m just going to keep pushing the technology and doing everything that I can to extend my life. I don’t see a point at which I would say “I don’t want to live anymore”
stop 0:10:24 / 0:10:24


Part-ID 019 David S. Pizer (Former Alcor Vice President, owner of the Creekside Preserve/Ventureville)

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If they do have to create their own eternity, they want to create a good one, and so they are laying down the right steps now. .. And also if we do develop physical immortality, which is what I do think we will develop, .. I think that will bring in a built in incentive for people to live moral lives, because you know, if you get the death penalty when people are immortal and they can live forever then that is a whole lot worse than the death penalty to a mortal person.
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Part-ID 020 Kenneth X. Sills (Director, Immortality Institute)

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I think the quest for immortality is not only noble, in enbues us with a Nobless Oblige. Those that achieve this are under an obligation to serve society, to serve back to humanity, and I think that we will have a lot to contribute.
stop 0:11:17 / 0:11:17

Edited by Matthias, 05 August 2007 - 07:54 PM.


#19 Matthias

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Posted 06 March 2006 - 03:21 PM

Part-ID 021 narrator: Life Extension Foundation

start 0:11:17 / 0:11:17
0:11:17.000
Growing to more than 100.000 members since 1980 the Life Extension Foundation is the worlds largest organization dedicated to investigating scientific methods for preventing aging and death.
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Part-ID 022 William Faloon (Director, Life Extension Foundation,www.lef.org)

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Members of the Life Extension Foundation typically are extremely dedicated to maintaining themselves in an optimal state of health. Many of them simply want to live as long as they can without suffering the debilitating effects of aging. Some of them are very hardcore: They actually want to live forever - as I do. They dont want to die, they dont believe people have to die if science advances fast enough to overcome the molecular changes that are involved in aging and death.
stop 0:11:57 / 0:11:58

Edited by Matthias, 05 August 2007 - 07:54 PM.


#20 Matthias

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Posted 07 March 2006 - 11:42 PM

DVD-title 2

Part-ID 023 narrator about aging

start 0:00:01 / 0:11:58
0:11:58.000
[ Aging ? ]
Trying to define more accurately the process of aging has been challenging for scientists. While the outward occurrence of aging on the human body seems obvious, finding exact biomarkers that accurately measures this process has been illusive.
stop 0:00:18 / 0:12:17

Edited by Matthias, 01 April 2007 - 08:24 AM.


#21 Matthias

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Posted 09 March 2006 - 03:24 PM

Part-ID 024 Christopher B. Heward, Ph.D. (Pres. Kronos Science Laboratories, Inc. Optimal Health Company)

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We do age but we don't age at the same pace. So the question is, why do we.. why are we old at 80 instead of 18? And what's so magic about the number 80 why not a hundred?.. why not 200? I mean, mice are old at age 3. Well, there is a big difference between 80 and 3. But.. why not.. longer? The difference must then not be.. hmm structural, must not be emm.. We don't age because of the passage of time, we age because our biochemistry allows us to age, or we age more slowly because our biochemistry allows us to age more slowly.
stop 0:01:04 / 0:13:02

Edited by Matthias, 05 August 2007 - 07:55 PM.


#22 Matthias

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Posted 10 March 2006 - 05:09 PM

Part-ID 025 Joao Pedro de Magalhaes, Ph.D.

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0:13:02.000
But I tend.. I tend to look more on this processes as, again as I said before, as linked to development wich is a well orchestrated
geneticly determined process. And then aging occurs indirectly because of the same set of processes. And the pace of wich development processes occur then also influences the pace in wich aging occurs.
stop 0:01:34 / 0:13:32

Edited by Matthias, 05 August 2007 - 07:55 PM.


#23 Live Forever

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Posted 11 March 2006 - 12:10 PM

Part-ID 026 Stephen L. Coles, M.D., Ph.D.

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My current research at UCLA involves Supercentenarians, people who are more than 110 years old, because that is the group of individuals who can tell us the secret, if they could, of what are the limits of human lifespan.
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Part-ID 027 Antonei Csoka, Ph.D.

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I think that therapeutic cloning is probably the most practical technique that we have for cheating aging, because you can in theory, well even in practice as well these days, take a cell, do nuclear transfer, make embryonic stem cells, and then differentiate those embryonic stem cells into whatever cell types you need to treat whichever disease you want, age related disease you want to treat. One example might be, one practical way you could treat the whole body possibly would be to make bone marrow stem cells from the embryonic stem cells, from the rejuvenated embryonic stem cells, and then you know seed those young bone marrow cells into the body, and they will automatically find their way into the bone marrow, because it is now known that the bone marrow replenishes a lot of other cells in the body, like in the vascular endothelium. Then, that way maybe you could sort of rejuvenate the vascular endothelium by giving people younger bone marrow.
stop 0:03:14 0:15:11


Part-ID 028 Ben Goertzel, Ph.D.

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I think that the point of view of Rafal and Aubrey and the others is basically correct. There may not be one magic bullet, but if we design therapies that will extend human life by 50 years, during those 50 years you can resolve the remaining problems through exponential advancement in science. So, I think its not clear now if its going to be a mitochondrial gene therapy, vector, genetic nuclear therapy, or whether its going to be a chemical compound. I don’t think that’s clear, there are a lot of details to be worked out with the mechanisms.
stop 0:03:53 0:15:52


Part-ID 029 narrator about Dr. Rose

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UCLA biologist Dr. Michael Rose established the evolutionary connection between sex and death by breeding fruit flies. Dr. Rose has selected only those flies who reproduced late in life and bred them with one another. The longer it took the insects to reproduce, the longer they lived. He now has flies that live more than 130 days instead of the usual 40.
stop 0:04:17 0:16:16


Part-ID 030 Michael R. Rose, Ph.D. (Professor in the Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology; University of California Irvine)

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And you go from this almost vertical increase in mortality rates to maybe a gentle increase in mortality rates of a bobbling up and down in mortality rates. This is amazing, is one of the more incredible instances. I know of vast numbers of colleagues in cell biology won’t agree with the following statement, but I think if the fundamental scientific issues in aging are largely resolved… by fundamental I mean really fundamental, the way a physicist would consider them fundamental. Not the way a biologist would consider them fundamental. To a biologist, a new pathway is fundamental, to me it isn’t. You know there are lots of pathways genic pathways, and biochemical pathways in organisms. That doesn’t mean that aging isn’t a huge practical problem, and its of enormous interest in actually producing interventions in human aging. If, you know, the person is interested in that, and I think that is an as valuable, if not more important, technological issue than building a better internet or faster car or traveling to the moon, or any of those other technological issues will be can accomplish. But, in addressing problems like traveling to the moon you are solving vast numbers of engineering problems, vast numbers of detailed problems and not doing fundamental science. .. In the same way I regard postponing aging in humans in the same category as taking a person to the moon, we require a vast amount of engineering and a great deal of scientific expertise, but in itself is not really scientifically fundamental. So, I am a scientist and what I am most interested in my scientific research as opposed to my involvement in any kind of practical activity, is the deepest questions, and the deepest questions right now to me revolve around biological immortality. What is it all about? Something we really didn’t understand existed before the 1990s in organisms like ourselves. We knew that it existed in organisms like sea anemones, creosote, juniper, trembling aspen, some hydra, simple coelenterate, .. nobody was really studying that phenomenon, because nobody really cared that much because most people that work on aging do it from a medical standpoint which means humans, or if not humans then certainly mammals, .. and all these organisms that didn’t have an aging process were far removed from mammals. We now know that all mammals, or more precisely all the evidence suggests that all mammals undergo a cessation of aging very late in their life cycle, and from that point on aging stopped. So, life can be thought of as being divided into three basic stages. The first one is your development and growth to maturation. The second part is your aging phase which starts just about when you are mature, and then continues for a very long time, but then finally stops when you enter a third phase, a phase of biological immortality in which aging no longer occurs and you have in the case of many organisms, but not all, a very low survival probability per year which doesn’t really systematically degrade with time. And, that third phase which is not really been explored by contemporary biology is what interests me now. Late life.
stop 0:07:22 0:19:20

Edited by Matthias, 05 August 2007 - 07:56 PM.


#24 Matthias

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Posted 11 March 2006 - 12:43 PM

Part-ID 031 William Faloon

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start 0:07:22 / 0:19:20
[ Caloric Restriction ]
You know the Calorie Restriction is the most documented way to extend our lifespan. We are looking for nutrients, drugs, hormons that have the same effect on our genome as does Calorie Restriction.
stop 0:07:35 / 0:19:34


Part-ID 032 Peter Voss

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If we believe that there is a good chance that technology will become available in the next ten, twenty, thirty years to dramatically extend our lives or to give us indefinite life spans, then of course the most important thing is to stay alive long enough to, you know, to benefit from that technology. And that's one of the main reasons why I am doing Calorie Restriction, because it very dramatically reduces the risk of dying, of killing diseases.
stop 0:08:07 / 0:20:05

Edited by Matthias, 05 August 2007 - 07:56 PM.


#25 veneto

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Posted 11 March 2006 - 12:51 PM

Part-ID 033 Robert Bradbury

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And that's why caloric restriction works, is because if you run a mitochondrial leaner, which is what you do when you are basically calorically restricted. Ok? Then they produce less few radicals, then the few radicals don't damage the nuclear DNA, then you don't get the double strain break problem, or they damage it at a little slower rate.
stop 0:08:29 / 0:20:27

Edited by Matthias, 05 August 2007 - 07:57 PM.


#26 veneto

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 06:45 AM

Part-ID 034 Louise Gold (CFO, Adaptive A.I. Inc)

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To me caloric restriction is eating just enough food to sustain your body and making sure that you get enough vitamins and nutrients.
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Part-ID 035 Ben Goertzel, Ph.D.

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The amazing advance in the understanding of aging that we are now, as was in 1995, is really obvious. The caloric restriction research wasn’t even really started then and all these mechanisms that Aubray de Grey is talking about they were barely inclined at that point of time, so there is just no arguing with the amount of advance that's going on.
stop 0:09:07 / 0:21:05


Part-ID 036 Joao Pedro de Magalhaes, Ph.D.

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It’s why shouldn't it working in humans? I mean there are species that live longer than us. So caloric restriction may allow us to push our limits a little bit further. I don’t think we reached the limits of human longevity/jeopardy????, not at all.
stop 0:09:23 / 0:21:21


Part-ID 037 narrator: about Dr. Aubrey de Grey

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Many things??? in sharp prospective University of Cambridge gerontologist Dr. Aubrey de Grey calls aging a barbaric phenomenon that shouldn't be tolerated in polite society.
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Part-ID 038 Aubrey de Grey, Ph.D.

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The main reason why people feel that curing aging would be a bad idea and that, in other words converted, is that aging itself is actually a good thing, is, as a 'copy strategie' yes, people start think, that any prospect of do anything about aging is fundamentally horrible.
Then their own way, you know, to put it out of ones mind is to convince oneself that's actually not so bad after all.

Edited by Matthias, 05 August 2007 - 07:58 PM.


#27 veneto

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 04:13 PM

Part-ID 039 Joao Pedro de Magalhaes, Ph.D.

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But if you take a look at population in general, then you see most people are sceptical about anti-aging research. They don't think it's possible to slow down human aging within a reasonable future. And so, if you can show, that it's possible to reverse aging in mice or it is possible to reverse or delay even for a small degree aging in old people, I think that would bring a lot of attention to feel the attitude, give peolple the sensation that real anti-aging interventions are within their grasp.
stop 0:10:41 / 0:22:39


Part-ID 040 Ben Goertzel, Ph.D.

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..but the greatest progress in understanding.. is just incredible, so it's almost like there is a, there is a more slarved??? biological understanding going on. Just like every 18 months computer processing speed is spread up by roughly factor two. It seems like in the last 10/15 years every couple of years there is a revolutionary new tools and new understandings in molecular biology and if that happens for another 8 or 10 years, it seems pretty likely to me that we will come more aware of a new radical new uderstanding of aging.
stop 0:11:19 / 0:23:17


Part-ID 041 David Kekich

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Typically researchers are very conservative people. Now aging researchers are.., or people who are involved in aging particularly are little more optimistic than most people. But maybe researchers are typically pretty conservative. So we had, we pose a question in the future when would you think people would say aging was solved or cured or whatever. And like when do you say polio for example was cured people stood polio very rarely but and people would may be stole??? aged but basically when would they say aging was cured. And we threw out extreme high and extreme low and we came up with an average or mean of, I think it was 2019 and to me that was shocking because thought I was really far out there in my optimism, I picked 2030.
stop 0:12:16 0:24:14


Part-ID 042 Ben Best (President, Cryonics Institute, Clinton Township, Michigan)

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-after understand aging as a desease, usually when I ask the question I asked how long would you live if you can live as long as possible, ???? for condition.
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Part-ID 043 Rafal Smigrodzki, M.D., Ph.D.(University of Virginia, Dept. of Neurology, research focus is on mitochondrial function)

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start 0:12:28 0:24:27
Aging, then, is a disease affecting our DNA. It is the continous accumulation of mutations both in the nuclear and in the mitochondrial genome. Hard to tell which genome is more important for aging. It would appear that the nuclear genome is more important for cancer. However, the mitochondrial genome may be just as important, or perhaps even more important, for things like Diabetes or Alzheimers Disease. Right now, jury is out [COMMENT: figure of speech for 'which one is true has yet to be determined'], but one or another aging is caused by accumulation of damage in the DNA.
stop 0:13:10 0:25:08


Part-ID 044 William Faloon

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start 0:13:10 0:25:08
Aging ia absolutely a disease. It is the ultimate disease that kills everyone who doesn't succumb to another dease first. Aging would be curable. Aging is the advancement essentially of our DNA to the point where we become debilitated to the point where the cells no longer function. At our biomarker research laboratories we are able to look at various genes that affect the aging process and we have been able to show how the introduction of certain drugs and nutrients can actually positively affect those genes so the ones that cause us to grow old are turned off and some of the ones that enable cells to stay healthy are turned back on, so we have been able to do in a roughly small way at this point of time some manipulation in the aging process using available medications and nutrients.
stop 0:14:04 0:26:04

Edited by Matthias, 05 August 2007 - 07:59 PM.


#28 Matthias

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 05:10 PM

DVD-title 3

Part-ID 045 narrator about deathism

start 0:00:01 / 0:26:04
0:26:04.000
[ Deathism ]
While advancements in biotechnology continue to add healthy years to human life span there are individuals who express concern about this trajectory. Daniel Callahan, cofounder of the Hastings-Center says that 'there is no known social good coming from the conquest of death'. And the worse possible way to resolve this issue is it to leave it up to individual choice. The President's Council on Bioethics headed by Doctor Leon Kass exemplifies what is sometimes referred to as deathism. A long infreventural??what???? death. In an article entitled 'Why not Immortality?' Doctor Kass writes that victory of immortality is the unstated but implicit goal of modern medical science. However, Doctor Kass continues by writing that 'immortals cannot be noble' and that 'the finitude of human life is a blessing for every human individual, whether he knows it or not.'
stop 0:01:03 / 0:27:03

Edited by Matthias, 28 April 2006 - 09:58 AM.


#29 veneto

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 08:20 AM

Part-ID 046 Max More, Ph.D. (Founder, Extropy Institute)

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start 0:01:03 / 0:27:03
..one assertion that Dr. Kass makes is, he says that the immortals cannot be noble. Which a hilarious statement to make! For some reason he thinks that very short lived beeings were very stupid: ..don't have time to develop and cells become mature and then makes experiences before they die, like human beings. They can be noble apparently but beings who can live indefinitely, acquire wisdom, more experiences, learn from life; for some reason they cannot be noble, he says. So I think, he is absolutely backwards. My view is that when we live a few hundred years, a few thousand years, however long, we will look back on who we are today - these very primitive human beeings pretty biological. I would think, what callow shallow people those were. My goodness, They tried their best as poor creatures, by the very limited brains they had, driven by their genes and their hormones, really quite helpless poor beeings, but my goodness, we can do so much better now.


Part-ID 047 James Dale (Genetic Researcher)

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Well in a sense Leon Kass is an advocate of youth denature, you know, encouraging people to believe that death is somehow good for them. And you know, the question I would pose is, you know, which is more noble, trying to convince people that death is somehow you know a good thing for you or somebody that's trying to actually safe people’s lifes?


Part-ID 048 Rafal Smigrodzki, M.D., Ph.D.

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start 0:02:12 / 0:28:14
"Immortals cannot be noble.." Mr. Kass, what do you know about immortals? Right? I couldn't disagree more with this kind of approach,
I think that people like Leon Kass are missing missing what it is to be human. They claim that to be human you have to die, that’s .. death is what gives meaning to our lives. Another person quoted here William Hurlburt.. [comment: Dr. William Hurlburt is on the President's Council on Bioethics with Dr. Leon Kass ] Hurlburt says that "that dependency gives us a sense of meaningful connection within the journey of our lives." I really really don't agree, and it's as simple as that. It's a ??? disagreement. And I don't think I need to provide any special arguments. Any person who looks into his heart and sees appreciation of death, I think, is missing the point. I think life is: About beeing alive. About learnig more about the world. About cooperating with other people in beeing alive and Exploring the world and you know maybe even reaching for the stars one day. That is what it is to be human. That’s the meaning of life.


Part-ID 049 William Hurlbut, Ph.D. (President's Council on Bioethics)

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start 0:03:43 / 0:29:45
What if, what if lifes meaning really does relay to working out your.. your salvation with fear and trouble as it's said in the bible. What if it does relay to something beyond physical existence. And many many people who have lived very rich physical lifes are joyful at the face of their death because they feel like those’s lives were about something even more for rich. What if it does? What if the very nature of life is such that.. that an infinite number of recreational trips, an infinite nuber of books, an infinite number of this or that does not lead to to any richer happiness. But that in fact being part of a drama of frailty infinitude where we actually give to one another our very substance and sometimes even die doing it What if that's what it's about? I mean, to me the scenario that is painted by infinite immortality of a physical type at least to the mode that I know the world doesn’t have nearly the ??? of drama and the power of significance that the story of those who sacrifice themselves for others does have.


Part-ID 050 Rafal Smigrodzki, M.D., Ph.D.

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start 0:04:58 / 0:31:00
Well there are parts if you read Kass he sounds like apart???. But once you strip down all the flowery verbiage. It's very simple: Death is good, disease is good. And as a scientist, and as a physician it's something I simply disagree with.


Part-ID 051 William Hurlbut, Ph.D.

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start 0:05:20 / 0:31:22
I'd be happy to step aside and and people have their three score and ten [comment: year long life-spans],.. rather they'd have four score or maybe six score. But all that starts to get a bit cheeky at that point. I think over a hundred starts to get cheeky. [comment: =unrealistic]


Part-ID 052 Natasha Vita-More

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start 0:05:33 / 0:31:44
I think that individuals such as Dr. Kass, Dr. Fukuyama, Dr. Hurlbut are justified in much of the reasoning and I think that they seem to care about their lives and the lives of people around them and I think that they do believe that they are on a correct path, but their correct path is not the path for everyone. Their value system is not the value system for everyone and it's not saying that their value is wrong or bad or that those who are advocates of super longevity are wrong or bad, it is not saying that all. It's saying that the premise by which they base their values, the premise of believing in shorten life span and believing in death as being asynchron on??? are not the way of the future. They are simply not paying attention to all the advances that are going on and they are not paying attention to the fact that those of us who are involved in super longevity and life extension and working in organization such as the Immortality Institute, Alcor Foundation, Extropy Institute, 'Transhumanist Arts and Culture', are individuals who are very involved in our work, most of us have a strong career path, are educated, many phds, masters, individuals who - weather they are degreed or not - have spent a tremendous amount of time working on their field, that we have thought about these things, we have contemplated it, contemplated them to the degree that I think is is substantial, certainly we don't know everything but most of us have a pretty good spin on what's going on when you take : Dr. Michael West and Dr. Max More and Ray Kurzweil and Aubrey de Grey - Dr. de Grey and.. Michael Rose, and and.. just all those they are friends in our community and our colleagues in our community and think about the tremendous amount of work that they have put forward.. I.. there is.. It does not make any sense: It just doesn't make any sense that Dr. Fukuyama, Dr. Kass would make such rash and abrupt statements about all those of us who are transhumanists.


Part-ID 053 William Faloon

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start 0:07:48 / 0:33:49
[ The FDA ('Food & Drug Administration') ]
The life extension foundation initial mission was to fund research and achieving physical immortality. Regret ably the FDA got on our way, they were interfering certain scientists who were doing research projects that were very critical. They were interfering with the ability of our members to access documented anti aging therapies. They even came in a raid to our facilities several times and see all the supplements we were operating. So we were forced to go to war with the FDA. Since then we have won numerous victories in court. We protected the first amendment right for supplement companies to tell the truth to the public about what dietary supplements may really do. Probably our biggest victory was getting enough supplement users in the United States, for talking about literally millions of millions of americans, to write letters to congress, to fax congress, to call congress and demand in 1994 that the 'dietary supplement health and education act' to be passed and that was passed by an overwhelming majority. And that single act has resulted in more dietary supplements beeing available never before at lower prices and in significant innovations in this unregulated area of health care as opposed to the regulated prescription drug market where you don’t have a lot of innovation, you've got a lot of side effects a lot of deaths and very high prices. We evaluate all the public scientific literature and then we do set into a lay format for publication into our one hundred and ten page monthly magazine, called 'Life Extension Magazine'. We also summarize our findings into a sixteen hundred page book called 'Disease Prevention and Treatment'. And we make that book available every other year to our members. And this essentially summarizes the best scientific methods of treating or preventing a hundred and twenty nine diseases that the medical community has overlooked. these ways that are documented in scientific studies but are not being applied in clinical medical settings.

Edited by Matthias, 05 August 2007 - 08:00 PM.


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#30 Matthias

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 12:25 PM

Part-ID 054 narrator: some statements about Life Extension

start 0:09:39 / 0:35:41
The prospect of human life extension is being discussed by leaders around the world. Well addressing the 'Eights Annual Millenium Evening' at the White House in 1999 President Clinton stated: 'We want to live forever, and we're getting there.' He also added that 'We've treated the human genome project as a priority every year because we all want to live forever.' A few business and business leaders are beginning to fund aging research: Larry Ellison, chief executive of Oracle, has contributed more than 20 million Dollars per year for aging research. In 2001 Larry Ellison said: 'Death has never made any sense to me.. how can a person be there and then just vanish, just not be there? Death makes me very angry. Premature death makes me angrier still.'
stop 0:10:28 0:36:30



DVD-title 4

Part-ID 055 narrator about Vladimir Nabokov

start 0:00:01 / 0:36:30
The cradle rocks above an abyss, and common sense tells us that our existence is but a brief crack of light between two eternities of darkness.. Nature expects a full grown man to accept the two black voids, fore and aft, as stolidly as he accepts the extraordinary visions in between. Imagination, the supreme delight of the immortal and the immature, should be limited. In order to enjoy life we should not enjoy it too much. I rebel against this state of affairs. Vladimir Nabokov.
stop 0:00:41 / 0:37:11


Part-ID 056 Eliezer Yudkowsky (Research Fellow, Singularity Institute For Artificial Intelligence)

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start 0:00:41 / 0:37:11
[ Oblivion ?]
..you know, to say, 'well I am going to die, therefore life must not be all that good'. To say, 'I am going to die' this is absolute horrible, and then you keep your brain in that mode. You know, you are shifting around to say, what.. You don't look for consultations, you're not supposed to be consult. You are going to die! It's horrible! You should do something about it!
stop 0:01:04 / 0:37:33

Edited by Matthias, 05 August 2007 - 08:01 PM.





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