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Study: Royal Jelly royalactin may bolster the ability of stem cells to renew themselves

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#1 Phoebus

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Posted 05 December 2018 - 05:30 PM


 

Researchers at Stanford University found that the main active component in royal jelly, a protein called royalactin, activates a network of genes that bolsters the ability of stem cells to renew themselves. It means that, with royalactin, an organism can produce more stem cells to build and repair itself with.


Royal jelly has intrigued scientists since its dramatic impact on honeybee development first became clear. But its effects on other animals have sparked even more interest. Previous studies have shown that royal jelly can improve the lifespan of a range of animals from nematode worms to mice.“We have a very identifiable avenue through which royal jelly’s effects are carried out,” said Kevin Wang, who led the Stanford team. “It has this activity of keeping stem cells in a self-renewing state.”

Writing in the journal Nature Communications, the Stanford team shows that royalactin increased the ability of mouse stem cells to renew themselves, suggesting the protein can have biological effects across species.

The scientists wondered whether a protein similar to the honeybees’ royalactin may be active in humans. After searching scientific databases, they found one that bore a similar structure. The protein is active in the earliest stages of human embryo development, when it is thought to build up the embryo’s supply of stem cells. When it came to naming the protein, Wang suggested Beyoncé – “a nice name for human queen bee” – but settled for regina, the Latin for queen.

“Everything points to this being a super important molecule,” said Wang. “We have identified an early self-renewal molecule that we think helps to establish the source cells for all of the embryo’s stem cells.”

https://www.theguard...laim-scientists


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#2 Phoebus

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Posted 05 December 2018 - 05:33 PM

so will we be seeing a royalactin extract on the market? 

 

I bet it would be insanely expensive 



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#3 Nate-2004

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Posted 05 December 2018 - 08:45 PM

What would it be extracted from? Humans have their own version it seems. Synthesized maybe, but extracted? Also, how would it get to where it needs to go? Direct bloodstream injection? What if it needs to get to a certain part of the brain?


Edited by Nate-2004, 05 December 2018 - 08:45 PM.


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#4 Phoebus

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Posted 05 December 2018 - 10:02 PM

 

Article OPEN Published: 04 December 2018

 

Honey bee Royalactin unlocks conserved pluripotency pathway in mammals

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Nature Communications volume 9, Article number: 5078 (2018

 

Abstract

 

Royal jelly is the queen-maker for the honey bee Apis mellifera, and has cross-species effects on longevity, fertility, and regeneration in mammals. Despite this knowledge, how royal jelly or its components exert their myriad effects has remained poorly understood. Using mouse embryonic stem cells as a platform, here we report that through its major protein component Royalactin, royal jelly can maintain pluripotency by activating a ground-state pluripotency-like gene network. We further identify Regina, a mammalian structural analog of Royalactin that also induces a naive-like state in mouse embryonic stem cells. This reveals an important innate program for stem cell self-renewal with broad implications in understanding the molecular regulation of stem cell fate across species.

 


Edited by Phoebus, 05 December 2018 - 10:03 PM.

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#5 QuestforLife

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Posted 06 December 2018 - 09:53 AM

This looks far more practical than inducing OSKM factors in humans.


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#6 Kentavr

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Posted 09 December 2018 - 09:13 PM

Very interesting. Thanks for the news.


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