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Will I ever figure out what’s wrong with me...

d vitamin

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#1 experimenting

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Posted 15 March 2019 - 11:26 PM


Chronic fatigue, brain fog, OCD unless I take suphraphysiological Vit D doses. But of course I can’t handle those-due to hypercalcemia. Vit K...doesn’t help.

What in the hell is wrong with me?!

#2 Hip

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Posted 17 March 2019 - 05:31 PM

Myalgic encephalomyelitis / chronic fatigue syndrome might be the first diagnosis to consider, though several other diseases can cause chronic fatigue and brain fog, including Lyme disease, hypothyroidism, celiac disease, lupus, anemia, hepatitis B or C, chronic inflammatory response syndrome (CIRS).


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#3 Mind_Paralysis

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Posted 18 March 2019 - 06:23 PM

List every test you have taken, when and how, and then list the various conclusions which may or may not have been drawn from the results.

 

Have Dr.s given you any speculations btw? Anything they've thought was suspicious?



#4 experimenting

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Posted 18 March 2019 - 11:09 PM

List every test you have taken, when and how, and then list the various conclusions which may or may not have been drawn from the results.

Have Dr.s given you any speculations btw? Anything they've thought was suspicious?


See other thread. Lab work and genes there.

#5 MankindRising

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Posted 20 March 2019 - 09:08 AM

Figuring out whats 'wrong' with you can become an obsession for the brain on its own. Trust me I catch myself over and over also with this.

End of the day you will still have to live with your genes regardless of the 'journey' people are taking to try 'fix' themselves.

Life WILL END, we all WILL DIE, accept it, accept vulnerability and this itself can be healing (by mentalling opening yourself to new possibilities) and bring joy to life by increasing appreciation for the things in life.

 

Before you say: 'you dont know what your talking about'  I do actually know what Im talking about as Ive been in a similar situation like you. I do agree that the things that you say is largely attributed to your genes. Hell in fact nearly EVERYTHING we do is down to our genes.

 

Since you respond to do Vitamin D3 (and so do I) you have to realise that Vitamin D3 is actually a hormone and not a vitamin and controls an extremely large degree of genetic processes.

I think you should look into autophagy/autoimmunity as I feel this is something that might affect you.



#6 Hip

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Posted 20 March 2019 - 03:42 PM

End of the day you will still have to live with your genes regardless of the 'journey' people are taking to try 'fix' themselves.

 

Your personal genes are not the only ones you find in your body and in your cells: dozens of viruses which live intracellularly in the body on a long-term basis will introduce their own genes into your cells. Those viral genes will make a range of proteins that can alter cellular functioning, and there are many viral proteins that ae designed to "hack" the human immune system, in order to thwart the immune response.

 

Scientists such as Prof Paul Ewald posit that most non-genetic chronic diseases of currently unknown etiology are likely caused by infectious pathogens that have infected your cells and now permanently live in your body.

 

Epstein-Barr virus for example, which is found living in around 90% of adult humans, has now been proven to cause several cancers, and is considered the likely cause of multiple sclerosis (MS). EBV is also linked to myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), and studies show that around 4% of those who are hit with mononucleosis (glandular fever), which is usually caused by EBV, will go on to get ME (and ME is a horrible illness that often lasts for the rest of your life, leaving 50% of sufferers housebound or bedbound for decades).

 

Enterovirus B is another nasty virus that can live in human cells long term. Enterovirus B is linked to myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), type 1 diabetes, Parkinson's, sudden death by heart attack, and several other diseases.

 

For more info: List of Chronic Human Diseases Linked to Infectious Pathogens


Edited by Hip, 20 March 2019 - 04:18 PM.

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#7 MankindRising

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Posted 20 March 2019 - 07:09 PM

@hip

Thats interesting, but I dont see how thats helping experimenting in any way. In fact my whole point was that too much digging for information to 'fix oneself' can lead to stress and frustration of its own = more problems/die faster.



#8 Hip

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Posted 20 March 2019 - 07:50 PM

@hip

Thats interesting, but I dont see how thats helping experimenting in any way. In fact my whole point was that too much digging for information to 'fix oneself' can lead to stress and frustration of its own = more problems/die faster.

 

If you have ME/CFS, as the OP might have, and you find that you have chronic active infections with certain viruses, then taking antivirals which target your specific viral infections can sometimes lead to improvements in symptoms. Antivirals usually will not eliminate an infection, but they can reduce it, which in turn will reduce symptoms.

 

I know ME/CFS patients who are housebound or bedbound due to the sheer bone-crushing fatigue and energy catastrophic drain of ME/CFS, but have improved enough to go back to work as a result of antivirals.

 

 

Also, if it is indeed the case that most chronic diseases are caused by infectious pathogens, then humanity as a whole has to wake up and face this issue. Most people do not die of old age, but of chronic diseases or cancers. And if most of these disease and cancers are really due to pathogens within our cells, then if you want to increase lifespan and healthspan, the human race has got to face the issue of pathogens head on. 

 

This will mean introducing more vaccines to protect us from these pathogens (hopefully safer vaccines), as well as developing better antiviral drugs. 


Edited by Hip, 20 March 2019 - 07:52 PM.


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#9 Dichotohmy

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Posted 21 March 2019 - 05:18 PM

@hip

Thats interesting, but I dont see how thats helping experimenting in any way. In fact my whole point was that too much digging for information to 'fix oneself' can lead to stress and frustration of its own = more problems/die faster.

 

 

This is an important point to consider, but also an in interesting dilemma due to the way health care works.

 

On one hand, even when you "figure out what is wrong with you" and have a firm medical diagnosis, doctors may not know what to do or be able to help you anyway. If you have mediocre health insurance and over-burdened doctors, that diagnosis can make you the hot potato that no doctor wants to catch, so you get ignored and likely ultimately passed to a psychiatrist. Try reading some dysautonomia, EDS, CFS/ME, fibromyalgia, Hasimotos/hypothyroid, or even chronic pyschiatric-disorder patient communities to see sad examples of people who have been forsaken by the medical system. Such is the burden of chronic illness: the illness is chronic because there are few, if any, evidence-based cures or even treatments. Thus, too often a doctor's best answer is that maybe you'll get better if you can just stop focusing so much on the disease and get over the health anxiety and depression. Indeed, often a firm diagnosis is quite useless and, if the diagnosis carries a stigma, an example of "be careful what you wish for."

 

On the other hand, such chronic illness patients often have to be their own doctor. Here, having a firm diagnosis can help the patient better determine a possible treatment. What really matters in the end is finding a good treatment and getting back to normal life. Therein lies the dilemma, some treatments (like IVIG, anti-virals, exotic cutting-edge drugs) are prohibitively expensive or hard to obtain for most people, so sometimes a firm diagnosis can help if you get lucky enough to receive a diagnosis that isn't stigmatized or untreatable. So ultimately, the patient has to walk a fine line between effective self advocacy and pursuing a firm diagnosis, and obsession. Obsession definitely can make things worse if it results in real health anxiety, which causes the patient to get worse due to things like sleep deprivation, pursuing escapism to deal with circumstances, or by unnecessary biological stress.
 


Edited by Dichotohmy, 21 March 2019 - 05:31 PM.





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