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What are your thoughts on IOLs (IntraOcular Lenses) for vision correction or cataracts

lens replacement

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6 replies to this topic

#1 YOLF

  • Location:Delaware Delawhere, Delahere, Delathere!

Posted 14 June 2019 - 07:52 AM


I've been reading up on lens replacement and while they can give you crystal clear vision, apparently some of these things are only done after you reach age 40 as eye itself is expected to grow until that time. 

 

So will our aging interventions negatively impact our ability to receive these types of implants in the future? What are the risks if you get them younger? What happens if there is still growth in our eyes that leads to complications?

 

Will certain types of IOLs be worse for those desiring to do strenuous work outs?

 

How do our older members who've had them feel about them? Any limitations or inconveniences we should be aware of?

 

I'm also aware of N-acetyl-carnosine eye drops. and while I trust that they work, the idea of having the best visual acuity of my life is seductive and from what I've heard, the NAC drops are shy of 100% clearance of the crystallin-amyloid fibrils and won't correct an astigmatism.

 

Any other products involving rosmarinic acid and EDTA in the works or available anywhere? I've read good things about this combination.

 

What about the LEF products?



#2 platypus

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Posted 14 June 2019 - 09:20 AM

I'm waiting for the Ocumetrix Bionic lense that promises supernormal visual acuity and focusing ability. 


Edited by platypus, 14 June 2019 - 10:10 AM.

  • Agree x 1

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#3 Oakman

  • Location:CO

Posted 14 June 2019 - 01:25 PM

I'm waiting for the Ocumetrix Bionic lense that promises supernormal visual acuity and focusing ability. 

 

Actually amazing! Wonder what they'll cost? Can't be cheap for sure...

 

https://www.youtube....3&v=7uS3y1N7T14



#4 YOLF

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Posted 14 June 2019 - 06:42 PM

Actually amazing! Wonder what they'll cost? Can't be cheap for sure...

 

https://www.youtube....3&v=7uS3y1N7T14

The real question, is when can I get this, and can it replace the conventional IOLs that are available now?

 

 


Edited by YOLF, 14 June 2019 - 06:45 PM.


#5 YOLF

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Posted 14 June 2019 - 09:36 PM

Looks like the Canadians and Europeans will get it first. The cost will be $3,200 CAD per eye, or about $4,770.40 at the current exchange rate for both. Regulatory approval is somewhat confusing as they list Canada, USA, Europe, etc. but state as of April 2019 they have been delayed one year for regulatory approval and the anticipated time to market was 2 years for Canada/EuroU, and 2-3 years more for the USA... So I'm guessing if we want to go to Canada to get it, we'll have to wait either 1 year, or 2-3.

 

 

What was that about Canadians coming to the US for healthcare?



#6 Daniel Cooper

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Posted 25 June 2019 - 08:43 PM

The real question, is when can I get this, and can it replace the conventional IOLs that are available now?

 

 

It depends on what you mean by replacing the conventional IOLs.  If you mean taking out an implanted IOL and putting this one in, the answer is unfortunately no.  It's not surgically feasible without doing excessive damage to the eye. 

 

If you mean can it do the same thing as an existing IOL only better in a new patient, the answer appears to be yes.

 

As far as how long?  Sounds like you might be able to get it in 2 or 3 years in Canada and Europe.  But, I would not be surprised if it takes longer.  These things normally do.


Edited by Daniel Cooper, 25 June 2019 - 08:45 PM.


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#7 joesixpack

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Posted 25 June 2019 - 11:05 PM

The operation is not a slam dunk.

 

You don't qualify for insurance purposes until your cataract reaches a certain level. Many report better vision, but not everyone. Also many report an annoying flickering in the eye with the new lease that apparently doesn't go away. Sometimes the capsule that the new lense is wrapped in (which stays in the eye when the lease expands) develops a wrinkle that has to be zapped with a laser. Sometimes this does not work and impairs vision.

 

My wife had the operation and has the flickering and impaired vision. Instead of perfect distance, she still needs glasses to correct for distance, and near vision.

 

So while it works most of the time, it does not work as described all the time.






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