• Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log In with Google      Sign In    
  • Create Account
  LongeCity
              Advocacy & Research for Unlimited Lifespans

Photo
- - - - -

what do you do to prevent Parkinson's?

parkinsons

  • Please log in to reply
17 replies to this topic

#1 ironfistx

  • Guest
  • 1,172 posts
  • 64
  • Location:Chicago

Posted 29 December 2019 - 07:26 AM


Are there any eating choices or anything we can do to keep this from happening?  I've read that chocolate can cause it.


  • Pointless, Timewasting x 1

#2 ibtisam_midlet

  • Guest
  • 105 posts
  • 1
  • Location:algeria

Posted 29 December 2019 - 09:09 AM

i think if you took crazy long half life potent anti-oxidant you will prevent many disorders that accrue with aging like Parkinson, Alzheimer's Disease etc..


  • Dangerous, Irresponsible x 2
  • Needs references x 1
  • Pointless, Timewasting x 1
  • like x 1

sponsored ad

  • Advert
Click HERE to rent this advertising spot for SUPPLEMENTS (in thread) to support LongeCity (this will replace the google ad above).

#3 Turnbuckle

  • Location:USA
  • NO

Posted 29 December 2019 - 10:08 AM

See the following paper--

 

Potential application of lithium in Parkinson's and other neurodegenerative diseases

 

A growing body of evidence suggests that the benefits of lithium extend beyond mood stabilization. Lithium treatment has been shown to provide neuroprotection against neurological insults including excitotoxicity, ischemic damage, and traumatic brain injury (Basselin et al., 2006; Zhu et al., 2010). In addition, lithium has been shown to contribute to remyelination and axonal regeneration (Makoukji et al., 2012). In particular, lithium treatment has been associated with neuroprotection against neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's diseases as well as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). This review focuses on the effects of lithium on Parkinson's disease and some of the presumed mechanisms by which lithium provides its protective properties.

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC4621308/

 

 

As for chocolate, this paper suggests its β-phenethylamine content might be a problem for those who consume a lot of it--

 

 
If a person takes 100 g of chocolate per day, the total β-PEA
intake would be 0.36–0.83 mg/day depending on the type
of chocolate[58]. Since β-PEA is an integral component of
many food items, a “chocolate addict” would be exposed
to a much higher dose. It has recently been demonstrated
that acute (one day) and chronic (7 days) intraperitoneal
administration of β-PEA, both at doses of 0.63 mg/day
and 1.25 mg/day, are sufficient to cause parkinsonian
symptoms in adult mice[28]. These results suggest that the
amount of chocolate that a person takes normally might be
toxic to dopaminergic neurons. 
 

 

 

 

 


  • Informative x 1
  • WellResearched x 1
  • Agree x 1

#4 Dorian Grey

  • Guest
  • 2,159 posts
  • 972
  • Location:kalifornia

Posted 29 December 2019 - 04:14 PM

Watch your ferritin and keep it out of triple digits.  

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC5101491/

 

"Iron overload has been implicated in the pathology and pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). The substantia nigra, where the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons occurs, is the primary region in the brain known to deposit iron. Additionally, aberrant iron concentrations have been observed in other brain regions such as red nuclei, globus pallidus and cortex of PD patients, despite of unknown pathology1,2,3. Spectroscopic analyses of postmortem brains display an increased iron levels in the substantia nigra, which has been suggested to correlate with the severity of PD"

 

Get thee to a blood bank!  


  • Informative x 2
  • Good Point x 1
  • Agree x 1

#5 ironfistx

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 1,172 posts
  • 64
  • Location:Chicago

Posted 31 December 2019 - 01:10 AM

Watch your ferritin and keep it out of triple digits.  

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC5101491/

 

"Iron overload has been implicated in the pathology and pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). The substantia nigra, where the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons occurs, is the primary region in the brain known to deposit iron. Additionally, aberrant iron concentrations have been observed in other brain regions such as red nuclei, globus pallidus and cortex of PD patients, despite of unknown pathology1,2,3. Spectroscopic analyses of postmortem brains display an increased iron levels in the substantia nigra, which has been suggested to correlate with the severity of PD"

 

Get thee to a blood bank!  

 

Yeah, the posts you make about iron are regularly helpful.  I need to give blood and get some analysis.  IP6 makes iron lower yes?


  • Pointless, Timewasting x 1

#6 ironfistx

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 1,172 posts
  • 64
  • Location:Chicago

Posted 31 December 2019 - 01:13 AM

See the following paper--
 
 
As for chocolate, this paper suggests its β-phenethylamine content might be a problem for those who consume a lot of it--

 
 
 

These results suggest that the
amount of chocolate that a person takes normally might be
toxic to dopaminergic neurons.


Toxic? So is it better to not eat chocolate then? I eat between 0 and 60g of dark chocolate per day.

Like I have some lithium orotate. That makes me sleepy.

Edited by ironfistx, 31 December 2019 - 01:15 AM.

  • Pointless, Timewasting x 1

#7 Dorian Grey

  • Guest
  • 2,159 posts
  • 972
  • Location:kalifornia

Posted 31 December 2019 - 03:00 AM

Yeah, the posts you make about iron are regularly helpful.  I need to give blood and get some analysis.  IP6 makes iron lower yes?

 

From what I gather, IP6 can and does mop up free labile iron (which is what wreaks havoc with DNA & neurological lipids), but it can not reach iron stored in proteins (ferritin / hemoglobin), thus it does not lower substantial iron accumulations.  

 

The problem with large amounts of stored iron, is that an event like hypoxia (sleep apnea) or ischemia (heart attack / stroke) can liberate large amounts of iron from ferritin, overwhelming the minor ability of natures chelators (IP6, quercetin, curcumin, EGCG) to contain the mess.  

 

Ferritin also eventually breaks down into hemosiderin, which tends to be a bit leakier than ferritin as a storage protein.  When large amounts of old ferritin degrades into hemosiderin, iron homeostasis fails and ageing and age related degenerative disease accelerates.  This is the best theory I know of to explain why women outlive men by half a decade.  Males accumulate iron & ferritin throughout their adult life, while females exist in a state of near iron deficiency (through menstruation) until they are menopausal.  

 

Males also are more predisposed to parkinson's, and typically have more serious disease:

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC3003756/

 

"More men than women are diagnosed with Parkinson's disease (PD), and a number of gender differences have been documented in this disorder. Examples of clinical characteristics that appear in men more often than women include rigidity and rapid eye movement behavior disorder, whereas more women than men exhibit dyskinesias and depression."

 

Hemosiderin is almost impossible to get rid of once it forms, so prevention is the key.  

 

Keep ferritin out of triple digits and stay young and beautiful!  


  • Good Point x 1

#8 ironfistx

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 1,172 posts
  • 64
  • Location:Chicago

Posted 31 December 2019 - 03:10 AM

is there a bloodtest for this?


  • Pointless, Timewasting x 1

#9 Hip

  • Guest
  • 2,387 posts
  • -441
  • Location:UK

Posted 31 December 2019 - 03:11 AM

Avoid contracting enterovirus infection, as Parkinson's has recently been linked to enterovirus infection of the neurons. Enterovirus is also linked to T1D and ME/CFS.

 

Avoid organophosphate pesticides too, as these are known risk factors for developing this disease. Some people spray their garden or their houseplants with pesticides, and this increases the risk of contracting Parkinson's as well as other diseases like lupus and rheumatoid arthritis.


  • Needs references x 2
  • Agree x 1

#10 Dorian Grey

  • Guest
  • 2,159 posts
  • 972
  • Location:kalifornia

Posted 31 December 2019 - 03:38 AM

is there a bloodtest for this?

 

MRI can now detect hemosiderin in tissues: Meta-analysis of brain iron levels of Parkinson’s disease patients determined by postmortem and MRI measurements

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC5101491/

 

Ferritin is a dirt cheap blood lab: 

 

https://www.lifeexte...itin-blood-test

 

At $28 retail, your insurance probably will only pay $10.  No reason why your doc should not order this for you.  The upper limit for the normal range is set quite high at 300+ for males.  This is the threshold for clinical iron overload and not optimal health.  Keep ferritin under 100 for optimal health & longevity.  



#11 adamh

  • Guest
  • 1,031 posts
  • 117

Posted 31 December 2019 - 06:46 PM

Mannitol is a good treatment for pd but doctors won't tell you about it because they make nothing on it. Its otc and cheap. Its not a cure but helps with the symptoms 

 

https://mannitolbala...-new-treatment/


Edited by adamh, 31 December 2019 - 06:47 PM.

  • Needs references x 1
  • Informative x 1

#12 Rocket

  • Guest
  • 1,072 posts
  • 142
  • Location:Usa
  • NO

Posted 03 January 2020 - 01:05 AM

Nicotine has some positive effects on Parkinson's per some literature.
  • Agree x 1

#13 Daniel Cooper

  • Member, Moderator
  • 2,648 posts
  • 633
  • Location:USA

Posted 03 January 2020 - 04:11 PM

I'd like to hear more about the Mannitol.  Are there studies to back this up?

 

 



#14 sedentary

  • Guest
  • 155 posts
  • -17
  • Location:Charlestown

Posted 03 January 2020 - 08:51 PM

interesting about chocolate being toxic to dopamine. its something never being discussed. and then as dorian went on about iron being bad for dopamine too, it hit me. chocolate is shitload full of iron! not sure how absorbable it is compared to meats, but it is there, its a lot of it and its another reason why chocolate might be toxic. very interesting. this should be discussed more in detail in specific thread.


  • like x 1

#15 kurdishfella

  • Guest
  • 2,397 posts
  • -71
  • Location:russia
  • NO

Posted 21 October 2021 - 05:33 PM

alcohol, coffee and nicotine (inhaling) helps with my aim in gaming so I assume it helps with movement. But in low consumption of course. I like to take them with memantine which also helps. The good thing is they all bypass the need of small intestine to absorb course it helps with absorption.


Edited by kurdishfella, 21 October 2021 - 05:35 PM.

  • unsure x 1

#16 OneScrewLoose

  • Guest
  • 2,378 posts
  • 51
  • Location:California
  • NO

Posted 25 October 2021 - 06:42 PM

See the following paper--

 

 

As for chocolate, this paper suggests its β-phenelethylamine content might be a problem for those who consume a lot of it--

 

 

I didn't read the whole thing, but from I can tell, that paper is garbage. PEA will be broken down rather quickly by MAO-B (some in the digestive track) before it ever accumulates enough to take any effect. So if you don't have an MAO-B inhibitor, your not gonna see any of the hypothetical effect to begin with. I looked for the methods section to see how the hell they inhibited MAO-B or otherwise got enough PEA in the brain, but alas, there was none, it's just a theoretical paper. So, if that's the reason you're gonna avoid chocolate, don't. Just enjoy the chocolate.  :)

 

Now, speaking of MAO-B inhibitors, these have been shown to be generally neuroprotective, and to be preventative in the development of both Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. It's why smokers have up to a tenfold reduced risk for both, because of the MAO-B inhibitors (beta-carbolines) found in cigarettes. But you don't need to poison yourself for that benefit, for example, I've been taking selegiline since I was 19 because my grandfather had Alzheimer's.

 

Relevant Studies:
https://sci-hubtw.hk...3-211-33328-0_7
https://sci-hubtw.hk...2272-017-0960-8

https://bit.ly/3pCCBrJ



#17 BieraK

  • Guest
  • 274 posts
  • 56
  • Location:Arcadia
  • NO

Posted 13 April 2022 - 12:09 AM

Selegiline.
According to Joseph Knoll and colleages Selegiline is similar to PPAP and BPAP in low doses, it has a "catecholaminergic enhancer effect" even in doses low enough for not displaying a MAO-B inhibition properties.
 

0.1 - 0.5 mg a day is the dose for such effect. You can dose it lower.

 

DEVELOPMENT OF ( )-1-PHENYL-2-PROPYLAMINOPENTANE
Knoll developed ( )-1-phenyl-2-propylaminopentane, a DEP analog, which is as equally active with DEP in enhancing the activity of the catecholaminergic brain engine, but it is devoid of MAOI property. This study furnished primary evidence that the main effect of DEP, the specific stimulation of the catecholaminergic brain engine, is unrelated to MAO inhibition.

 

EVIDENCE THAT DEP TREATMENT PREVENTS AGING-RELATED
PIGMENT CHANGES IN THE SUBSTANTIA NIGRA OF RATS

As neuromelanin is a marker of aging, Knoll and his coworkers developed a procedure for measuring the number, total area, area of one granule and density features of melanin granules in neural cells of the substantia nigra in groups of 3-month-old and 3 years old male rats. The majority of the neural cells in young rats contained numerous, small-sized neuromelanin granules, whereas in the majority of neural cells of old rats, a smaller number of large-sized granules were detected. DEP treatment completely prevented aging-related pigment changes. 36

 

EVIDENCE THAT MULTIPLE, SMALL DOSE ADMINISTRATION OF DEP, WHICH LEAVES MAO-B ACTIVITY UNCHANGED, KEEPS CATECHOLAMINERGIC NEURONS ON A SIGNIFICANTLY HIGHER ACTIVITY LEVEL
Rats of both sexes were injected subcutaneously, daily for 21 days, with 0.1 ml per 100 g saline or with one of the following doses of DEP: 0.01, 0.025, 0.1 and 0.25 mg kg 1 . On brain samples removed 24 h after the last injection, the amount of biogenic amines released from the tissue within 20 min was measured: dopamine from the striatum, substantia nigra and tuberculum olfactorium; norepinephrine from the locus coeruleus; and serotonin from the raphe. Compared with the saline-treated rats, 3-week daily treatment even with the lowest dose of DEP (0.01 mg kg 1 ) kept the catecholaminergic neurons working on a significantly higher activity level. 37 These experiments revealed to Knoll the existence of a key important mechanism, the enhancer regulation, in the mammalian brain. A new period of DEP research began with this concept.

 

Ref: The significance of selegiline/( )-deprenyl after 50 years in
research and therapy (19652015)


  • unsure x 1
  • Informative x 1

sponsored ad

  • Advert
Click HERE to rent this advertising spot for SUPPLEMENTS (in thread) to support LongeCity (this will replace the google ad above).

#18 kurdishfella

  • Guest
  • 2,397 posts
  • -71
  • Location:russia
  • NO

Posted 27 May 2022 - 02:53 PM

electrolytes sodium , potassium etc are very important for all types of movement functions.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: parkinsons

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users