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Supplements that have shown promise in human studies

human mouse supplements

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#1 osris

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Posted 28 January 2020 - 04:56 PM


Can anyone here list the various anti-aging supplements that have shown promise in specifically human scientific studies, and not merely in mice ones?
 
I think such a list will avoid us wasting time on supplements that have only shown promise in mice.


#2 Dorian Grey

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Posted 29 January 2020 - 03:56 AM

The problems with good human studies are many.  Very difficult to have any group of people taking a single supp for at least 10-20 years for a proper comparison.  Then there's the issue of other lifestyle differences besides the supp.  Tobacco, alcohol, diet, physical activity, stress levels, prescribed pharmaceuticals & weight to name a few.  

 

Primate studies (baboon etc) might be the closest thing to a proper controlled study that probably would relate well to human physiology.  

 

I like looking at what has been accepted over time as most likely beneficial.  A search for curcumin in PubMed produces 14425 results.  This tells me a lot of folks over the years believe there is something to this supp!  I also find peculiar habits in large blue zone populations interesting.  The Japanese live stressful lives in crowded, toxic big cities & they smoke more than about anyone else.  They also live longer than 90% of the rest of the world.  They eat lots of fish & veg, but then many other cultures share this diet.  What pops out at me is the amount of green tea they drink.  It's almost universal, and a daily routine.  Correlation does not (always) imply causation, but if this is all you've got and it's easy to do, I say why not?  

 

Longevity research don't come easy.  Got to pay your dues!  There is a lot of interesting work out there if you spend a couple hours/day reading & pondering the matter.  I'd been pondering health & nutrition for 20 years before I stumbled onto Ferrotoxic Disease, and this is my primary area of interest now.  The retrospective studies are impressive, so I'm doing an active study of one (meself!).  Time will tell if my little fetish will bear fruit.  I'll get back to you in 20 years or so when I'm in my 80s & let you know how it's going.  



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#3 osris

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Posted 29 January 2020 - 06:06 AM

Thanks. That all makes sense.

 

I wonder why mice are experimented on rather than primates with regard to longevity supplements, given what you say? Is it because mice are seen as less "conscious" than primates, and, therefore, presumably, suffer less if things go wrong?



#4 Dorian Grey

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Posted 29 January 2020 - 06:23 AM

Primate labs are very expensive, & have ethics issues.  A lot of work was done with them in the mid 20th Century though, & it's all on PubMed if you can find it.  

 

I believe baboons, macaques & rhesus monkeys were most commonly used, so an advanced search for: curcumin (&) baboon (or rhesus or macaque) for instance might yield some results.  



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#5 mkp6019

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Posted 11 February 2020 - 06:48 PM

Japan seem to excel in healthspan and longevity but believe many of those studies look at the island of Okinawa where lifestyle and nutrition are different than city life dwellers.

My most consistent supplements have been Curcumin and Green Tea. Recent use of Niacin 100 mg daily and Creatine have boosted my chronic health issues. Not sure what PubMed says about those two. 

 

 







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