• Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter Log In with Google      Sign In    
  • Create Account
  LongeCity
              Advocacy & Research for Unlimited Lifespans

Photo
- - - - -

Wynn Protocol Regimen

supplements regimen protocol

  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 jimjim

  • Guest
  • 7 posts
  • 2
  • Location:United States
  • NO

Posted 29 June 2021 - 06:55 PM


Here is my protocol.  The second and third pages has most of the supplements I take.   Let me know what you think!

 

https://docs.google....dit?usp=sharing


Edited by jimjim, 29 June 2021 - 06:55 PM.

  • Agree x 1

#2 9lives

  • Guest
  • 30 posts
  • 8
  • Location:Phoenix, AZ

Posted 04 November 2021 - 04:53 AM

I was curious about the "Wynn Protocol", so I Googled it and found your post on another site. lol

I was wondering why you're avoiding NAC. The study you referenced, it would be interesting to see their reasons. But in my view, NAC promotes glutathione production and that's usually a good thing. Now if someone has a high toxic burden, boosting the more potent antioxidants like SOD is a good idea. Another thought is, NAC boosts Phase I detox pathway CYP450. If your CYP* genes are already expressing fast, the unprocessed metabolites from the Phase I detox can be carcinogenic and cancer causing. Phase II detox clears out the metabolites. So the strategy is, slow down Phase I and boost Phase II (so it can keep up). There's other supplements that can inhibit Phase I to offset, and I'd also recommend getting a DNA test like 23andMe to find out how efficient your genes work.



sponsored ad

  • Advert

#3 jimjim

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 7 posts
  • 2
  • Location:United States
  • NO

Posted 04 November 2021 - 05:25 PM

I was curious about the "Wynn Protocol", so I Googled it and found your post on another site. lol

I was wondering why you're avoiding NAC. The study you referenced, it would be interesting to see their reasons. But in my view, NAC promotes glutathione production and that's usually a good thing. Now if someone has a high toxic burden, boosting the more potent antioxidants like SOD is a good idea. Another thought is, NAC boosts Phase I detox pathway CYP450. If your CYP* genes are already expressing fast, the unprocessed metabolites from the Phase I detox can be carcinogenic and cancer causing. Phase II detox clears out the metabolites. So the strategy is, slow down Phase I and boost Phase II (so it can keep up). There's other supplements that can inhibit Phase I to offset, and I'd also recommend getting a DNA test like 23andMe to find out how efficient your genes work.

 

 

NAC does promote glutathione and is a major antioxidant.  According to the paper, however, NAC decreased oxidative stress and prevents cell senescence .  From what I understand cells need to be able to become senescent and basically turn off itself so it no longer replicates, thus possibly preventing cancer.  If there is no stress there is no signal to become senescent.  So, I've changed my protocol to, "Avoid chronic NAC", which means to not take it all the time and to cycle it.  That way cells exhibit some stress which will activate hormetic pathways.

 

 

Here is the paper: https://insight.jci....8NpspFnT3jlbHsE



#4 9lives

  • Guest
  • 30 posts
  • 8
  • Location:Phoenix, AZ

Posted 05 November 2021 - 06:15 AM

Hmm. My interpretation of the paper is a little different, and it's very specific to lung disease. Apparently healthy individuals might not have to worry about that as much.



sponsored ad

  • Advert

#5 jimjim

  • Topic Starter
  • Guest
  • 7 posts
  • 2
  • Location:United States
  • NO

Posted 05 November 2021 - 06:54 AM

It is a mouse study so it may not translate to humans.  You are free to interpret the results anyway you wish.  However, I will say that if you smoke, it's probably not a good idea to take NAC consistently.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: supplements, regimen, protocol

1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users