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Explain this paradox

cognitive enhancement

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#1 Believer

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Posted 02 December 2021 - 02:38 PM


Galantamine (low and high dosage) worsens my cognitive functions

Amphetamine (low and high dosage) worsens my cognitive functions

Modafinil (low and high dosage) worsens my cognitive functions

Antioxidants like vitamin E, astaxanthin etc., (low and high dosage) worsen my cognitive functions

Cognitive functions like attention, memory, etc.

 

Anyone else experience this?



#2 Daniel Cooper

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Posted 03 December 2021 - 03:31 PM

I'll take a stab but what I'm giving you is opinion with not much to back it up.

 

I believe that some cases of poor cognition are due to an overactive rather than underactive CNS. Neurons that are too quick to fire result in excessive and therefore less coordinated neural activity in the brain.  High cognitive ability is the result of a high level of well coordinated neural firing. If you keep increasing neural activity then at some point it becomes more difficult to keep different areas of the brain synchronized so they are working in concert with each other. 

 

The first three drugs on your list are pro-excitatory.  If your CNS is already overactive, this will tend to make things worse.

 

I've known people that seem to have an improvement in cognition with a small amount of neural damping. Small amounts of a benzo or alcohol or other substances that dampen neural activity seem to benefit them cognitively. But, it's a very thin line to walk and it's really easy to develop a dependency so it's hard to recommend that as a course of action. But at the least, if your CNS is over excited you would want to avoid taking something that will make the situation worse.

 

 


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#3 Believer

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Posted 03 December 2021 - 04:39 PM

I'll take a stab but what I'm giving you is opinion with not much to back it up.

 

I believe that some cases of poor cognition are due to an overactive rather than underactive CNS. Neurons that are too quick to fire result in excessive and therefore less coordinated neural activity in the brain.  High cognitive ability is the result of a high level of well coordinated neural firing. If you keep increasing neural activity then at some point it becomes more difficult to keep different areas of the brain synchronized so they are working in concert with each other. 

 

The first three drugs on your list are pro-excitatory.  If your CNS is already overactive, this will tend to make things worse.

 

I've known people that seem to have an improvement in cognition with a small amount of neural damping. Small amounts of a benzo or alcohol or other substances that dampen neural activity seem to benefit them cognitively. But, it's a very thin line to walk and it's really easy to develop a dependency so it's hard to recommend that as a course of action. But at the least, if your CNS is over excited you would want to avoid taking something that will make the situation worse.

This makes perfect sense. I have high glutamate levels which causes itching all over my body from top to bottom, and stress attacks. As well as irritability and increased mental and physical pain perfection, and other issues.

When these itch and stress attacks occur I get comorbid severe inattentive ADHD symptoms which can last for up to 3 days.

 

Many antioxidants are also excitatory by increasing glutamate levels. Vitamin E and glutathione increases glutamate, as does astaxanthin under some circumstances.

 







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