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Cryonics Without Ischemia. What does cryonics with an S-MIX of zero look like?

ischemia

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#1 MaximilianKohler

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Posted 29 January 2024 - 06:19 PM


https://biostasis.su...ithout-ischemia



#2 Mind

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Posted 29 January 2024 - 10:22 PM

Great to see people contemplating the future of better cryopreservation.

 

The main problem, in my opinion, is that most patients themselves are unlikely to go into a state of extreme hypothermia where they are minimally "alive" in order to get an extremely good cryopreservation. Most people are so extremely motivated toward self-preservation in their current state, even when extremely old and decrepit, that they will likely not go into cryopreservation "early", even if they are legally permitted to do so.



#3 MaximilianKohler

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Posted 30 January 2024 - 12:54 PM

The main problem, in my opinion, is that most patients themselves are unlikely to go into a state of extreme hypothermia where they are minimally "alive" in order to get an extremely good cryopreservation.

The author of the piece agrees with that and states that the providers have a responsibility to reduce ischemia.

 

 

Most people are so extremely motivated toward self-preservation in their current state, even when extremely old and decrepit, that they will likely not go into cryopreservation "early", even if they are legally permitted to do so.

I don't think that's the main problem. I think the main problem is that people die unexpectedly without any stand-by services near them.

 

I wrote in this thread https://www.longecit...ed-deanimation/ about ways we can work on improving that, but it hasn't gotten much attention. So I would say "apathy" of people signed up for cryonics may be one of the biggest causes of ischemia.

 

We can move to states that have assisted suicide, and that's one of the best ways to reduce ischemia, but even if you live there chances are good that you will die unpredictably without being able to take advantage of it.
 



#4 Mind

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Posted 30 January 2024 - 06:11 PM

Agreed. The biggest problem is that people die unexpectedly without cryonics services nearby. I was just saying that even in a good circumstance where there is a standby team, the patients are usually very old with poor circulatory systems, so it makes a good perfusion very difficult.


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#5 MaximilianKohler

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Posted 01 February 2024 - 01:16 PM

Would be nice if I could edit the OP to add this summary from their monthly newsletter:

 

Under real-world conditions it is challenging to completely prevent (cerebral) ischemia in a cryonics case. A new metric called the S-MIX (Standardized Measure of Ischemic Exposure) aims to bring more rigor to the practice of cryonics by estimating the total equivalent amount of ischemia sustained in a cryonics case. In his article about how to achieve an S-MIX of zero, Aschwin de Wolf describes what a cryonics protocol without any metabolic deficit should aim for. Cryonics as an elective medical procedure is not available yet but we can use this framework to think about how to upgrade and improve current procedures.

 

 






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