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Anti-Aging Skin Supplements


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#91 efosse

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Posted 28 August 2007 - 12:27 AM

I used the acnelamp for 3 months -- good results. Problem: you have to do it for 30 minutes (or at least I had to) to get the results for acne. I think I noticed improved skin texture, etc but that could be a placebo effect or just a consequence of less acne.

#92 sentinel

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Posted 30 August 2007 - 10:37 AM

Fredrik,

On the matter of effective sun screens I notice you don't mention Ambre Solaire, is that for a particular reason?, I recently purchased the one below which has Mexoryl XL and seemed pretty reasonable (cheap) off ebay ie £6.99 incl delivery for 200ml.

AMBRE SOLAIRE UVA -UVB LOTION SPF 30 (200ML)
CLEAR PROTECT SPRAY
Garnier Ambre Solaire Clear Protect offers high protection in a transparent formulations and is non-greasy and non-sticky, leaving absolutely no white marks. Practical to use: ultra fresh to apply, quickly absorbed and designed to allow you to spray all over the body, even working upside down, leaving no white streaks. They contain Mexoryl® XL, an advanced patented filter, for UVA and UVB rays and protect against sun induced skin damage and premature ageing of the skin caused by sun exposure. They also contain a hydrating complex, enriched with Cactus Nutriflavones and Pure Vitamin E, to defend the skin by hydrating it.

I'm not particularly excited about the Cactus Nutriflavones but is it a comparable product to it's L'oreal counterparts to your knowledge? We have had a particulaly lousy summer in the UK but I still want an effective product.

Thanks. [thumb]

Sentinel

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#93 Fredrik

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Posted 30 August 2007 - 10:57 AM

Fredrik,

On the matter of effective sun screens I notice you don't mention Ambre Solaire, is that for a particular reason?, I recently purchased the one below which has Mexoryl XL and seemed pretty reasonable (cheap) off ebay ie £6.99 incl delivery for 200ml.

AMBRE SOLAIRE UVA -UVB LOTION SPF 30 (200ML)
CLEAR PROTECT SPRAY
Garnier Ambre Solaire Clear Protect offers high protection in a transparent formulations and is non-greasy and non-sticky, leaving absolutely no white marks. Practical to use: ultra fresh to apply, quickly absorbed and designed to allow you to spray all over the body, even working upside down, leaving no white streaks. They contain Mexoryl® XL, an advanced patented filter, for UVA and UVB rays and protect against sun induced skin damage and premature ageing of the skin caused by sun exposure. They also contain a hydrating complex, enriched with Cactus Nutriflavones and Pure Vitamin E, to defend the skin by hydrating it.

I'm not particularly excited about the Cactus Nutriflavones but is it a comparable product to it's L'oreal counterparts to your knowledge? We have had a particulaly lousy summer in the UK but I still want an effective product.

Thanks. [thumb]

Sentinel


Hi there :)
Sorry, I completely forgot Loreals Ambre solaire brand. I don´t like fragranced skincare that is why it´s not on my radar. It is comparable to the Loreal solar expertise brand. Vichy and La roche posay have higher UVA-protection though (higher PPD numbers).

I like to have both mexoryls, SX and XL in the same product. Check to see if it also includes mexoryl SX = terephthalylidene dicamphor sulfonic acid.

Mexoryl XL is listed as drometrizole trisiloxane. Together they show a synergistic effect in protection.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ecamsule

Edited by fredrik, 30 August 2007 - 11:30 AM.


#94 sentinel

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Posted 31 August 2007 - 07:57 AM

Seems to have both, from the Garnier (Ambre Solaire) site:
"Garnier uses a patented filtration system called Mexoryl® XL & SX which offer effective protection against UVA and UVB rays and premature skin ageing caused by sun exposure. Garnier Ambre Solaire offers photostable sun protection for the whole family in a broad range of SPF's" ..etc

The main reason I looked at the range is because they are cheaper than their L'oreal counterparts whilst offering a similar level of protection. I'll just have to see what the smell is like, it's supposed to be pretty subtle in the clear range.

sentinel

#95 tintinet

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Posted 31 August 2007 - 11:05 AM

The availability of UVA blockers appears to be already rapidly expanding, even for US consumers, albeit still for a steep price. Just one find below:




La Roche-Posay Anthelios XL 50+ Fluid Extreme Corps (Body)
A broad spectrum UVA/UVB ultra protection sunscreen milk. Formulated for the body, light weight and water resistant. (Size: 125ml)

Active Ingredients: Mexoryl SX, Mexoryl XL, Titanium Dioxide and Octocrylene.

Ingredients: Water, Dicaprylyl Carbonate, Octocrylene, Alcohol Denat, Isononyl Isononanoate, Titanium Dioxide, Glycerin, Cyclopentasiloxane, Butyl Methoxydibenzoylmethane, cyclohexasiloxane, PEG-30 Dipolyhydroxystearate, Dimethicone, Silica, Propylene Glycol, Poly C10-30 Alkyl Acrylate, Drometrizole Trisiloxane, Nylon-12, Ethylhexl Triazone, Polymethylsilsesouioxane, Bis-Ethylhexyloxyphenol Methoxyphenyl Triazine, Dodecene, Glycine Soja/Soybean Oil, Lauryl PEG/PPG-18/18 Methicone, Methylparaben, Pentasodium Ethylenendiamine Tetramethylene Phosphonate, Phenoxyethanol, Poloxamer 407, Terephthalylidenedicamphor Sulfonic Acid, Tocopherol, Triethanolamine.

La Roche-Posay strongly recommends a consultation with a dermatologist to recommend the ultimate skincare regimen.

Availability: Usually ships in 2-3 business days.
Item # 3337872409714
$55.00pad
Qty

#96 sdxl

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Posted 31 August 2007 - 12:54 PM

An SPF 30 should at least give you a PPD of 10 if it complies with the new EU guidelines. I demand a sunscreen to at least give me a PPD of 20, so I ussually end up buying SPF50+. I'm pretty sure the Ambre Solaire clear protect line doesn't have any TiO2. So lacking any possible whitening effect, but also any synergisms between organic filters and SPF boosting properties compared to the ones that have TiO2.

L’Oréal Solar Expertise does have a Kids spray and milk that are fragrance free and have ceramide 5. Garnier Ambre Solaire has the UV Sensitive line that is fragrance free. I buy them on sale, otherwise I get La Roche-Posay or Vichy sunscreens with better UVA protection for about the same price.

And holy something $55 for Fluide Extreme Corps is crazy. [:o] You almost can buy 3 of those with that money here.

#97 neogenic

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Posted 31 August 2007 - 04:42 PM

La Roche Posay Anthelios XL Milk/Lait SPF 60 Face and Body reviews say its much greasier than the 40 for face. Is this problematic? Greasy, sounds like pore-clogging...

#98 neogenic

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Posted 31 August 2007 - 04:49 PM

What I mentioned above it says is unavailable, maybe it has been replaced with the aforementioned 50,

http://www.amazon.co...6551532-9443019

#99 neogenic

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Posted 31 August 2007 - 05:03 PM

Fredrick, any thoughts on copper peptides and CoQ10? How about these formulas?

http://www.amazon.co...88578965&sr=1-7

http://www.amazon.co...88579179&sr=1-9

http://www.amazon.co...88579179&sr=1-2

#100 neogenic

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Posted 31 August 2007 - 05:04 PM

I found this on a website searching for some of the ingredients discussed. It appears to be a complete breakdown of many things that have been debated. Love to hear some discussion on it. It is by a company, so it may be biased, unsure.
http://www.amacorp.c...meceuticals.htm
During the past few years, many new and effective skin care therapies have become available to correct and protect against the effects of aging. Almost all of the currently marketed skin care products incorporate one or more of the following agents.

Features of aging skin include:
thinning of the epidermis and dermis;
coarsening of the skin texture, including enlargement of pores;
laxity with wrinkling;
discoloration, including yellowing, bronzing, and brown spots;
telangiectasia, or "broken veins".
These unwelcome changes are brought about by the relentless pull of gravity and cumulative damage to DNA, collagen, and cell membranes by free radicals produced from normal cellular metabolism, environmental elements, and exposure to solar radiation.

"Cosmeceuticals" can be roughly defined as products which have a therapeutic benefit, but without necessarily having a biologic or physiologic benefit. As an example, if a manufacturer claims that a product improves the appearance of wrinkles (a therapeutic benefit), that product would be considered a cosmetic by law. If however, the manufacturer added the claim that the product increased collagen thickness in the skin by a specific physiologic mechanism, the product would then be considered a pharmaceutical, or drug.

Although it's clear that many of these cosmeceuticals work by altering physiologic processes in the skin (thus meeting the legal definition of a drug), manufacturers will often avoid making specific claims or holding clinical trials to avoid subjecting their product to the lengthy and expensive US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval process.

There is no legal category named "cosmeceutical"; the FDA legally defines products by their intended use as claimed by the manufacturer, as either cosmetic or drugs. Cosmetics are defined as products "intended to be [applied] ...to the human body for cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, or altering appearance", whereas drugs are defined as articles (other than food) "intended for use in the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of disease.....or intended to affect the structure or any function of the body of man or other animals." Under these definitions, some products, such as deodorants, flouride toothpastes, AHA's, etc. have intended uses as both cosmetics and drugs, and hence must comply with requirements for both.

Sunscreens: Although skin loses about 1% of its collagen and elastic tissue per year after age 25, it is the effect of ultraviolet light from the sun that causes most of the visible effects of "aging" skin. Regular use of an effective sunscreen is the single most important step one can take to maintain healthy, youthful-looking skin.

Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) from the sun damages proteins, elastin, and DNA in the skin, and is the major cause of skin aging and skin cancer. Short wavelength ultraviolet rays, or UVB, are absorbed primarily in the upper layers of skin (the epidermis), while the longer wavelength, or UVA, rays are more penetrating, causing damage in the upper, or papillary dermis. UVB damage to DNA in the cells of the epidermis s the most common cause of skin cancer, while UVA damages the delicate collagen and elastic fibers in the papillary dermis, causing loss of elasticity, wrinkling, discoloration and telangiectasia ( "broken veins"). Unlike UVB, UVA is only partially blocked by glass and atmospheric water vapor (clouds), and is less affected by time of day, season, and geography. Only UVB rays induce tanning, which is a protective response to radiation damage to the epidermis; the longer wavelength UVA rays such as those used in tanning booths, do not induce a true protective tan.

There is no such thing as a safe tan! The presence of a tan is evidence that the skin has been damaged by ultraviolet radiation. Damage induced by ultraviolet radiation is cumulative over a lifetime, and is not related to activity at the time of exposure (for example, 100 3 minute exposures while running errands is equivalent to 5 hours of continuous exposure lying on a beach).

Although it's almost impossible to eliminate exposure to UVR entirely, it can be minimized by protective clothing and proper use of an effective sunscreen. Effective protection from photoaging UVA is more demanding than that required for the cancer-causing UVB. The commonly used "SPF" refers only to UVB rays, and does not translate into UVA protection. Most "drugstore" sunscreen preparations are effective UVB blockers, but allow most of the more penetrating UVA energy to pass through and age the skin.

Traditional chemical sunscreens act primarily by binding to skin protein and absorbing UVB (280-320nm) photons, and most are based on para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA or its derivatives such as Padimate O), cinnamates such as methoxycinnamate, and various salicylates (Octyl salicylate). Many commercial preparations contain weaker UVB/UVA absorbers, including benzophenones (Oxybenzone, Benzophenone), dibenzoylmethanes, and anthraline (Menthyl anthralinate) derivatives, which have a limited UVA (320-400nm) absorption as well. Octocrylene is a weak but stable UVB absorber used to protect other agents from degrading. Avobenzone (Parsol-1789) is a benzophenone with fair UVA protection, but it degrades readily and tends to be irritating. All of these organic sunscreens (especially PABA) can cause allergic or irritant contact dermatitis, photoxic, and photoallergic reactions and no single organic agent gives complete protection from UVA and UVB radiation.

Physical agents, or sunblocks, act as barriers which reflect or scatter radiation. Direct physical blockers include metal containing compounds such as iron, zinc, titanium and bismuth. Iron oxide pigments are incorporated in many cosmetics, and provide protection from not only UV radiation, but visible and IR (infrared) as well. Zinc Oxide (ZnO) and Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) are highly reflective white powders, whose optical properties vary with particle size. Traditional ZnO sunblocks such as those commonly used by lifeguards are opaque white, but when the particle size of the zinc oxide or titanium dioxide powder is decreased to 100-150nm (submicron or "ultrafine" particles), they transmit visible light while retaining their UV blocking properties, rendering the sunblock invisible on the skin. Submicron zinc oxide is somewhat more stable than submicron titanium dioxide and offers better UVA protection. Allergic or irritant contact dermatitis or phototoxicity do not occur with these agents. Currently, preparations containing at least 2-6% submicron Zinc Oxide are the preferred sunscreens for comprehensive UVA protection.

Other ingredients that may be found in suncreens include "extender" substances such as mica or talc, and organic polymers such as micronized nylon and chitin. Aside from improving the "feel" of the sunscreen preparation, these substances can help scatter energetic photons and act as a "scaffold" for the active sunscreen ingredients, increasing the effective thickness of the active sunscreen layer.

Moisturizers: Moisturizers usually incorporate Emollients to smooth the skin surface by working their way into the non-living outer layers of the skin, filling spaces between the layers and lubricating, and Humectants to help skin cells absorb and retain moisture in these layers.

Commonly used emollients include mineral oil, petrolatum, shea butter, cocoa butter, and animal oils including squalane, mink oil, emu oil, and lanolin. Long-chain fatty acid esters such as myristates, palmitates, cetyrates, stearates, various triglycerides, and cholesterol and derivatives are often included in the formulation as thickening agents.

Humectants often used in moisturizers include glycerin and glycol derivatives, such as propylene or polyethylene glycol (PEG), hyaluronic acid and its salts, mono- and polysaccharides such as fructose, sorbitol, polysorbates, cellulose, and glucosamine and hyaluronates, phospholipids including ceramides and sphingolipids, amines such as triethanolamine and diazolinyl urea, and silicones such as dimethicone, which also has excellent emollient properties and contributes to the "feel" of the moisturizer.

Most commercially available contain a wide variety of other substances, including fragrances, antioxidants, A- and BHAs, preservatives (such as methylparaben), soothing agents such as bisabolol, allantoin, aloe, licorice, chamomile, green tea extract, etc., and various sunscreens.
Despite the common belief that moisturizers are the mainstay of skin care, they are often unnecessary and may even be detrimental in some patients, especially those with oily or especially sensitive skin. All moisturizers have the potential to clog pores and cause irritation, and should only be used when the skin is truly dry.

Alpha Hydroxy Acids (AHAs): AHAs, or "Fruit acids" are mild organic acids present in various foods. The most commonly used AHA is Glycolic Acid, derived from sugar cane; other AHAs used therapeutically include Lactic Acid (milk), Citric Acid (oranges, grapefruits, lemons), Tartaric Acid (grapes), Pyruvic Acid (bananas and other fruits), and Malic Acid (apples). AHAs are commonly used in low concentrations in cleansers, moisturizers, and toners, and in higher concentrations as light peel solutions.

The principal effect of AHA's is to loosen dead skin cells in the outer layers of the epidermis, increase cell turnover, and increase the deposition of glycosaminoglycans in the upper dermis. This refines the texture and appearance of the skin, unclogs pores, and weakens the epidermal barrier to allow effective penetration of other topical agents, including moisturizers, retinoids, bleaching creams, antioxidants, etc.

AHA's are also hypergolic, or water binding, and thus are outstanding hydrating agents. The net effect of this exfoliation and hydration is smoother and healthier looking skin.

The beneficial effects of AHAs have been known since antiquity. Legend has it that Cleopatra bathed in sour milk and Marie Antoinette in champagne, containing lactic and tartaric acid, respectively. A typical AHA regimen would include at least two weeks of daily use of a home care product, followed by a series of 3-6 light facial ("lunchtime") peels, spaced about 2 weeks apart. Other topical agents, such as bleaching creams, retinoids, etc. may be added gradually after the first peel. The home care AHA products are continued, and "maintenance" peels can be formed every few months as needed. Some patients will "plateau" after a while, and the concentration of AHA may be increased, and/or other therapies, such as light peels or microdermabrasion, added to the skin care regimen.

The efficacy of AHAs is directly related to the amount of free acid present in the product. A low pH (pKa) means more free acid, and greater penetration into the dermis, but with a greater potential for adverse reactions. Many products are prepared with a high concentration of an AHA, but are "buffered" with an alkaline solution such as NaOH or NH4OH, decreasing the acidity (raising the pH) and irritation potential of the product. This is why some products containing as little as 2% AHA can be more effective (and more irritating!) than products containing 20% or even more AHA. As AHAs became a more popular ingredient in skin care products over the last decade, the incidence of adverse reactions seen with high concentrations, such as severe erythema, blistering, pigmentary changes and eye irritation, prompted the Cosmetic Ingredient Review Panel of the FDA to limit consumer products containing AHA's to a 10% or less concentration, and salon products to less than 30% concentration or pH 3.0 or higher. Physicians may use AHA's in higher concentrations and lower pH, either alone or in combination with other agents.

Beta Hydroxy Acid (BHA): There is only one clinically important beta hydroxy acid, Salicylic Acid. This substance, a close relative of the common aspirin, is repelled by water and highly soluble in fats and oils, and is used primarily to open comedones and expedite penetration of less fat soluble AHAs into oily skin. It's most commonly used in combination with AHAs in light peeling solutions.

Retinoids: Retin-A (retinoic acid or tretinoin), originally approved for the treatment of acne, has been shown to be effective for the prevention and treatment of sun-induced skin aging. Effects include increased collagen and circulation in the upper or papillary dermis, reduction in hyperpigmentation and brown spots, increased cell turnover in the upper layers of skin, including blackheads and pores, and an overall improvement in the appearance of the skin. These beneficial effects of retinoids are related to the dose and duration of use, with the optimum effect noted after at least a year of treatment. Unfortunately, topical retinoids tend to be very irritating, with most patients experiencing redness, flaking, and increased skin sensitivity. Increased sensitivity to the sun is another drawback of retinoid therapy. A less well known drawback of retinoid therapy is that prolonged use (>4 months) is needed to produce significant improvement in the appearance of the skin . New and improved preparations of tretinoin, including Retin-A Micro and Renova, use improved delivery methods to minimize irritation.

Newer "Third Generation" topical retinoids, such as Differin (adapalene) and Tazorac and Avage (tazarotene) are currently approved for treatment of acne and photoaging. Avage (tazarotene) has been accepted as the "gold standard" topical retinoid for cosmetic use. Like other retinoids, it exerts its action on cellular receptors, and appears to be somewhat less irritating and photosensitizing, as well as more effective for both acne and photoaging, than Retin-A. Some of the effects of Avage include:

improvement of collagen synthesis and repair
decreased production and aggregation of melanosomes, thereby improving pigmentary abnormalities
increased production of ground substance (hyaluronic acid), thus "plumping" the skin and improving wrinkles
normalization of differentiation of keratinocyte differentiation, which decreases formation of clogged pores and scaly premalignant patches.
Retinoid activity is related to binding on nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RAR's) thereby regulating specific gene expression.
Like other retinoids, Avage needs to be properly incorporated into a skin care regimen to avoid unecessary irritation and maximize its effects. For more information on the proper use of Avage.

Retinol: Vitamin A, or Retinol, is converted to retinoic acid (tretinoin, Retin-A) in living cells. When applied to skin, Retinol penetrates betterthan retinoic acid, and does not produce the same irritating effects. Although its clinical effects are not as dramatic as retinoic acid, retinol is available without prescription and has been incorporated into many skin care products. Regular exfoliation with AHAs may enhance the effects of Retinol.

Bleaching Agents: Hydroquinone is the most commonly used agent for "bleaching" brown marks, liver spots, melasma, etc. Acting to block the formation of the skin pigment melanin, hydroquinone's bleaching activity is reversible, that is, the pigment returns when the hydroquinone is discontinued. Kojic acid, extracted from mushrooms, is a slighly less effective agent. Either may be compounded with AHA's. As with any bleaching agent, aggressive exfoliation and sun protection are necessary for good results. Either agent may produce redness and irritation, especially with prolonged use. Arbutin, extracted from bearberries (licorice), also is an inhibitor of of melanin production, and is often used in skin care products as a soothing agent.

Antioxidants: The ability of the body to turn nutrients into energy involves Oxidation. in which nutrients are "burned" in a controlled manner to provided energy for growth and repair. An inevitable result of this process is the production of free radicals. Free radicals may also be produced by processes other than oxidation, most notably from ionizing solar radiation, including UVA and UVB.

A free radical is an atom or molecule containing an unpaired electron. Elevated to an excited state by some energetic reaction, the unpaired electron will seek to attain a lower energy state by pairing up with another electron or electron rich molecule, as with 2 highly reactive free oxygen atoms pairing up to form the stable O2 molecule. The most significant free radicals in biological systems are those involving oxygen, such as the superoxide (HO2) and hydroxyl (OH) radicals, produced during normal cellular respiration.

By providing an electron, antioxidants may convert the free radical to a non-radical species, or to a more stable radical form. The pigment Melanin is an example of a stable radical form, where highly excited electrons are "shared" throughout the aromatic structure of the macromolecule, dissipating the electronic energy as heat. Another example of stable radical forming compounds are the spin trap compounds (see below). Dioxygen (O2) itself is a free radical (actually a diradical).

Free radicals play an indispensable role in normal biological processes, but these extremely reactive molecules can cause damage to normal cellular processes and structure, and are a key contributor to the aging process. To defend against damage from free radicals produced in the normal course of cellular function, biological systems have evolved Antioxidants.
Biologic antioxidant systems include:
Antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase
dietary antioxidants such as the tocopherols, carotenes, ascorbic acid, alpha-lipoic acid, glutathione, resveratrol, polydatin, etc.
"solid state" antioxidants such as melanin
DNA repair systems
Antioxidants are often incorporated into skin care products to protect the skin from free radical damage produced by normal aging, pollution, and UV radiation from sun exposure. Many of these antioxidants are available as dietary supplements, or "nutraceuticals", and have been demonstrated to have a plethora of beneficial effects, at least in the laboratory. Their role as topical agents is less well documented.
Vitamin C: Vitamin C, or ascorbic acid. is essential for collagen production, but exerts its antioxidant effects by quenching free oxygen radicals produced by ultraviolet radiation and by assisting Vitamin E in protecting cell membranes.
Although the photoprotective effects of l-ascorbic acid are well established, it readily degrades in the presence of UV radiation, and does not penetrate the skin well, except at high concentrations and high acidty. Vitamin C esters, although more stable, have limited bioavailability when used topically.
Vitamin E: The active form of Vitamin E, alpha tocopherol, has been shown to inhibit enzymes which promote breakdown of collagen and to protect cell membranes from oxidation (lipid peroxidation). Contrary to popular opinion, topically applied vitamin E has not been demonstrated to have a significant effect on scar formation.
Spin Traps: Spin traps are special molecules that can trap and detoxify damaging free radicals which age the skin. They are commonly incorporated into preparations which include other antioxidants.
The term "spin trap" is derived from the technique used to detect and identify free radicals, electron spin resonance. The most commonly used spin traps are nitrone derivatives, such as 5,5,-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO), alpha-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butly nitrone (POBN), and alpha-phenyle-N-tertbutly nitrone (PBN), themselves stable free radicals. Reactive free radicals are attracted and bound to the beta carbon atom in the spin trap, forming a spin adduct and effectively "trapping" the free radical, allowing the structure of the trapped radical to be deduced.

Spin Traps show promise as blocking agents for inflammation caused by UV exposure. Unlike traditional sunscreens, which prevent UV mediated inflammation when used before exposure, spin trap compounds scavenge free radicals and minimize the inflammatory response during and for up to 12 hours after exposure to UV light. By interfering with the inflammatory cascade, these compounds may prevent collagen and elastin degradation, and thus premature aging of the skin.

Coenzyme Q10: Also known as ubiquinone, Coenzyme Q10 is a component of all cell membranes, and is a vital component of the electron transport chain. It acts to shuttle electrons in normal metabolism, trap free radicals, and help regenerate other antioxidants present in the cell, especially vitamin E.
CoQ10's role in oxidative metabolism and ATP synthesis has been well described. It acts primarily as a electron carrier in the mitochondria, with a more theoretical role as a cellular antioxidant. It has been postulated that CoQ10 may play a major role in preventing lipid peroxidation in mitochondrial membranes. Oral administration of CoQ10 has had some anecdotal benefit in patients with a variety of mitochondrial cytopathies and disorders of energy metabolism.
Idebenone: Similar in structure to Coenzyme Q10, idebenone is a more efficient free radical scavenger, and functions incidentally as an electron carrier. It has been used outside the U.S. for years as an anti-aging compound, as well as a cognition enhancer in patients with Alzheimer's disease and other neurologic disorders.
Alpha-lipoic acid (thioctic acid) is a potent antioxidant normally found inside cells, acting to protect delicate cellular membranes from free radical damage during normal cellular respiration
Resveratrol and Polydatin deserve special mention as the substances responsible for the "French Paradox"; that is, the very low incidence of heart disease in residents of Southern France, despite high rates of smoking and a diet high in saturated fats. This effect has been attributed to a high consumption of red wine, a rich source of resveratrol.
Resveratrol and Polydatins are glucopyranosides found in many fruits and vegetables, the highest concentrations being found in grape skins, which synthesize these compounds in response to exposure to UVA/B and fungal pathogens. Biologic activities of these glucopyranosides include potent free radical scavenging activity, with cardio- and neuroprotection and inhibition of lipid peroxidation similar to that seen with vitmins C and E.
Boldine
Glutathione
Beta-Carotene: occuring in many vegetables, notably carrots and tomatoes, this compound helps minimize lipid peroxidation of cell membranes, and is especially effective at quenching UV-induced singlet oxygen.
Anthocyanins: these bioflavonoid compounds, extracted from pine bark ("Pycnogenol") and grape seeds actively quench free radicals and potentiate the effect of vitamins C and E.
Green Tea extract contains antioxidant poyphenols which have been shown to protect against redness and swelling induced by UV radiation.
Ginko Biloba: Often used as a dietary supplement, Ginko Biloba leaves contain an assortment of polyphenols and bioflavonoids. In addition to antioxidant effects, Ginko Biloba extracts has been demonstrated to increase collagen production in cultured fibroblasts, although this effect has not been conclusively demonstrated in living skin.
Human Growth Factors: Harvested as a by-product of tissue-cultured human skin, various human growth factors have been incorporated into topical preparations, the best known of which is TNS Recovery Complex. These substances, essential for wound healing and recovery, have been shown to reduce the number and depth of wrinkles and fine lines, as well as improve skin texture and elasticity when used over time.
Some of the growth factors found in tissue culture media include transforming growth factor beta (TGF-B), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Other substances found in cell culture media include matrix proteins, procollagens, interleukins, cytokines, and other compounds with biologic activity. As with any topical prepartion, penetration through the stratum corneum limits the bioavailability of these substances.

Peptides: Peptides are fragments or pieces of proteins, which have a variety of effects on cellular function. Many of the newer cosmeceutical preparations include both synthetic and naturally occuring peptides demonstrated in the laboratory to have a biologic effect on aging or damaged skin. Certain peptides may stimulate skin metabolism and repair, others inhibit the breakdown of collagen, and still others to decrease muscle movement, thus improving dynamic wrinkles.

Cosmeceutical peptides may act as "carrier" agents, to facilitate delivery of other agents into the skin, most notably copper, an important cofactor in collagen produbtion, as "signaling" molecules, by activating fibroblasts and inhibiting matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) which degrade collagen, and as inibitors of neuromuscular transmission by interfering with the activity of membrane proteins necessary for calcium dependent exocytosis and release of acetycholine.

Despite a better understanding of role of peptides in skin metabolism, repair, and aging, there's very little evidence that they have an actual effect on the appearance of skin, or even manage to get to the area in the skin or muscle to exert their physiologic activity.

Botanical Agents: Herbal remedies have been used since time immemorial, and a variety of botancial agents may be incorporated in skin care preparations.These agents are usually listed on the label as "extracts", and although there may be a rationale for their use based on folklore or in some cases in-vitro studies of the extract or its components, in most cases there is little if any scientific evidence that they are any more efficacious than placebo. Many of these may be toxic, or interact with other drugs when taken internally, and cause irritation, dermatitis, and/or photosensitivity when used topically. A lack of standardization of the various preparations further complicates any assessment of their efficacy.
Arnica Montana (arnica) has been used topically to reduce or minimize bruising and swelling, and and as a general soothing agent. Although studies have demonstrated these effects in the laboratory, rigourous clinical trials on patients have shown no significant effect.
Aloe Vera (aloe) has been demonstratede to enhance wound healing in patients with frostbite, and superfical abbraded wounds, although some studies have shown delayed wound healing, especially in deeper or complex wounds.
Berberis Aristata (barberry) extract contains berberine, a compound that has antiseptic and antinflammatory properties, but may also be a potent skin irritant in some patients.
Bromelain (pineapple) is an enzyme extracted from pineapple stems, which when taken internally, may help decrease swelling and speed the resolution of bruising when taken before a procedure.
Calendula officinalis (calendula) from the common marigold, has mild antinflammatory and antiseptic properties
Centella Asiatica (Hawaiian pennywort) extract or asiatic acid has known antinflammatory properties and may hasten wound healing.
Chamomile extract has been shown to have mild anti-irritant, soothing, and antioxidant properties.
Echinacea purpureae (purple coneflower)
Hammamelis (witch hazel)
Symphytum officiale (comfrey) Another traditional healing/soothing agent for swelling and bruising, comfrey has demonstrated liver toxicity and carcinocenicity in laboratory rats, and is not reccommended for internal use.
Mentha piperita (peppermint oil) is a mild antibacterial and antifungal agent, and can exert a cooling effect on the skin.
Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree oil) may antibacterial and antifungal when used topically.
Solanum Dulcamara (bittersweet)
Thuja (red cedar) extract is a mild antiseptic and used as a "calming" agent because of mild vasoconstrictive properties.
Thyme extract, from the herb, contains potent antioxidants
Copper: Copper is found in most biologic systems, and acts as a cofactor in collagen and elastin production, production of new blood vessels, and deposition of glycosaminoglycans in the skin. Unlike copper salts, which are highly toxic, copper atoms are stabilized with peptide complexes (short lengths of protein molecules-see above) to assist delivery into the skin. Copper peptide complexes used topically have been shown to increase procollagen formation and may help retard some signs associated with skin aging.

Zinc: Zinc is an essential element for many biologic processes, and acts as a cofactor for collagen repair and remodeling, control of damaging free radicals in the skin, and proper expression and replication of DNA. Topical uses of zinc-containing preparations include wound healing, anti-inflammation, seborrhea (dandruff), and acne preparations. The two best known zinc containing preparations are zinc pyrithione (for dandruff) and zinc oxide ointment.

#101 neogenic

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Posted 31 August 2007 - 05:29 PM

Another article:
http://www.skincarer...-treatment.html
Anti-Aging Ingredient Fact Sheet


In reviewing the skin rejuvenation treatment fact sheet, focus first and foremost on the anti-aging ingredients that have been clinically proven to be effective . . . and don't forget to take a look at the e-knowledge module on Anti-Aging Skin Care Tips!

Allantoin:

Allantoin is clinically proven to be effective and found as a common ingredient in many skin rejuvenation products. Its major benefits are found to be healing properties, skin repair, regeneration of skin cells, anti-inflammatory characteristics, and the ability to smooth the surface of the skin.


Alpha-Hydroxy Acids (AHA):

Alpha-Hydroxy Acids (AHA) are among the few anti-aging treatments that have been repeatedly clinically proven highly effective. The AHA's include glycolic acid found in products like Abkit's AHA/BHA 12% Treatment , lactic acid, tartaric acid, malic acid, and citric acid. AHA's are primarily exfoliants, but also stimulate skin repair, increase collagen production, increase skin thickness, improve elasticity, are an effective acne treatment, improve skin texture, improve skin tone and decrease enlarged pores.

Alpha Lipoic Acid:

Preliminary anti-aging treatment studies on alpha lipoic acid indicate a great deal of promise as an effective antioxidant which can repair sun damaged skin, provide protection to the skin, diminish fine lines and wrinkles, improve skin tone, and decrease large pores. Included as an active ingredient in many combination moisturizing products.

Beta Hydroxy Acids (Salicylic Acid):

Proven clinically as effective as the AHA's, beta hydroxy salicylic acid or BHA is an exfoliant that also improves skin texture, tone and acne. It is generally considered to be an alternative to AHA, and particularly beneficial for oily skin types. For an effective product, look for concentrations of 1 % to 2 % like Reviva Labs Beta-Hydroxy Acid 2%.

Coenzyme Q-10 (Ubiquinone):

Promising preliminary research indicates Co-Q10 is an effective antioxidant that repairs sun damaged skin, energizes new cell growth, possess firming properties, and smoothes skin. CoQ-10 is extremely reasonably priced, like Avalon's Co-Q10 Wrinkle Defense Cream or Serum and products from the Nivea line which are readily available at most larger retail stores.

Collagen:

Promising preliminary research on collagen indicates increased skin hydration, firming and plumping properties while improving fine lines and wrinkles. A word of caution, formulations need to be very specific in order to allow for adequate absorption into the skin.

Copper-peptides:

Promising preliminary research demonstrates qualities that include firming properties, enhances the skin's protective ability, an antioxidant, healing properties, stimulates collagen formation, improves the skin's elasticity, and promotes elastin production. The Neova line is a particular favorite, and Neutrogena has also begun to produce a line of Copper Peptide products.

Be careful not to layer with Vitamin C products as you will neutralize the effects of both treatments. Schedule each skin rejuvenation treatment at different times of the day.

DHEA:

Not clinically proven effective as a topical cream although it is believed to improve skin texture. This is a growth hormone which is typically taken as a nutritional supplement.

DMAE:

Although anti-aging treatment studies on DMAE have not been extensive, the results demonstrate positive rejuvenating effects in skin firming properties, the reduction of fine lines and wrinkles, improving moisture content, and in improving sagging skin. Good results are found when used in combination with vitamin ingredients such as Reviva Lab's Alpha Lipoic Acid, Vitamin C and DMAE Cream.

Estrogen (Estradiol .o1% or Estriol .3%):

Preliminary study results show promise in improving wrinkles, its firming properties, increasing collagen production, and improving the skin's moisture content. Topical use of estrogen is still in the study process.

The proven effects on improving aging skin currently occur when taken as a hormone replacement treatment for menopausal women, i.e., the birth control pill. Follow instructions carefully as there are warnings that accompany the use of estrogen. Consult with your physician prior to use or request a prescription specifically formulated for topical facial skin care use.

Green Tea:

Preliminary results are promising, indicating reduction in puffiness, diminishing fine lines and wrinkles, reducing large pores, decreasing inflammation, an aid in healing, and as an antioxidant. Sufficient concentrations are questionable in topical creams. Found as an active ingredient in many combination moisturizing products.

Hyaluronic Acid:

Clinically proven effective for diminishing fine lines and wrinkles. Hyaluronic acid is often used in conjunction with Vitamin C to assist in maximizing absorption into the skin.

Hydroquinone:

Clinically proven to effectively bleach age and dark spots as a skin lightening ingredient for hyperpigmentation (dark spots). Look for concentrations of 1% to 2% such as Derma E Skin Natural Fade and Age Spot Creme.


Kinerase & Kinetin (N6-Furfurladenine):

Preliminary anti-aging treatment studies are promising - decreases wrinkles and fine lines, improves skin tone, and retards cell aging. Although Kinerase Cream can be quite pricey!

Not as potentially irritating as Retinol or Vitamin C. A potential alternative for sensitive skin or for an intensive skin rejuvenation treatment around the eye area. Look for concentrations of .1%. Not readily available in retail stores as yet, with the exception of the Almay Kinetin product line.

Kojic Acid:

Clinically proven effective as a lightening treatment for skin pigmentation problems as it inhibits melanin (brown skin pigment) production. Often used as an alternative to hydroquinone.

Liposomes:

Preliminary studies indicate effective skin rejuvenation by improving skin hydration, reducing fine lines and wrinkles, while improving skin texture. Typically referred to and utilized as an agent to convey nutrients and such directly to the skin cells.

Liposomes are found as a component of many anti-aging treatments to facilitate the delivery of the active anti-aging ingredient through the skin layers and directly to the cells.

Lycopene:

Only preliminary studies completed for topical anti-aging effects as an antioxidant that can improve skin texture. Most commonly used in diets to build antioxidant protection.

Pal-KTTKS:

There have been no independent clinical studies to demonstrate the claims that Strivectin dramatically reduces fine lines and wrinkles. Pal-KTTKS is the active ingredient in StriVectin-SD.

Palmitoyl Pentapeptide:

Only preliminary studies have been conducted for the effects that stimulate collagen production, improving skin elasticity, repairing sun damaged skin and diminishing wrinkles. Sufficient concentration is necessary to produce results, although non-irritating.

Progesterone:

Not clinically proven as a topical skin rejuvenation cream but preliminary studies suggest effects that include diminishing wrinkles and fine lines and improving overall skin texture. Look for concentrations of 400 to 500 milligrams per ounce. Consult with your physician prior to use as this is a hormone with potential side effects similar to estrogen.

Tretinoin (Retinoic acid- Retin A / Renova):

Tretinoin is a form of Vitamin A that is clinically proven to have significant effective results for anti-aging treatment and skin care issues. Although available by prescription only results range from the reduction of both wrinkles and fine lines, increasing collagen production, smoothing skin texture, increasing skin thickness, improving elasticity, improving acne, exfoliation, improving overall skin tone, diminishing mottled pigmentation and increasing skin hydration. This is the strongest of the Vitamin A's and can be very irritating to the skin.

Retinol (a form of Vitamin A):

Retinol is clinically proven to have similar yet less significant effects as Tretinoin due to less efficient absorption into the skin. Effective skin rejuvenation treatments require a concentration of .3% to .6% of retinol. Can cause skin irritation so follow application directions carefully. The Afirm Product Line is a particularly popular option because it offers Retinol in strengths of 1X, 2X, and 3X.

Starting with the lower 1X strength to give your skin a chance to adapt, then gradually increasing the retinol strength can be an excellent strategy, especially for those with sensitive skin.

Retinyl Palmitate (Vitamin A derivative):

Promising preliminary anti-aging treatment research indicates that retinyl palmitate has similar skin rejuvenation effects to that of Tretinoin. A product such as Derma E's Vitamin A Retinol Palmitate Complex is non-irritating and considered a milder, more viable alternative to tretinoin.

Spin Traps:

Promising preliminary research on anti-aging treatment suggests significant rejuvenating results by trapping free radicals, detoxifying free radicals and as for skin protective properties. Described as an intelligent antioxidant that turns skin damaging free radical activity into productive regenerative activity. Touted as the next generation of anti-aging treatments, though rather difficult to locate specific products other than PCA Skin's Phaze 5 Nutrient Toner with an active spin trap ingredient.

Vitamin C (ascorbic acid):

Clinically proven in stable versions, Vitamin C increases collagen production, has powerful antioxidant properties, healing properties, reduces fine lines and wrinkles while minimizes scars. Look for Vitamin C Ester (ascorbyl palmitate) like Jason's Perfect Solutions Ester C+ as it is a stable, absorbable version of vitamin C. L-Ascorbic Acid is also widely considered to be an effective form of vitamin C which the skin can absorb in a stable version of 5% concentration.

L-Ascorbic Acid is often used in conjunction with hyaluronic acid to assist in effective absorption. Do not layer with Copper Peptides as the combination will nullify the effect of both products. Simply use each skin anti-aging treatment at a different time of day.

Vitamin E (tocopherol):

Clinically proven effective as an antioxidant, improving the skin's moisture content, skin protection properties, smoothing, and healing properties. A product's ingredient description should state high-potency E.

Vitamin K:

Clinically proven as an effective treatment for broken capillaries and bruising. An alternative to treating dark circles under the eyes and spider veins. Look for "Super K" products such as Vita K's Super Vitamin K for Blotchy Skin.

#102 sentinel

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Posted 03 September 2007 - 07:40 AM

Here's a good link for an informative page which collates inforamtion ingredients etc on most of the major Sunscreens:

http://maybe-leedong.spaces.live.com/Blog/...7!928.entry

sentinel

#103 luminous

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 02:41 AM

Fredrik,

I have a couple of followup questions.

You mentioned that Skinceuticals C + E ferulic serum is best bought on ebay in small sample bottles. I've never used ebay, but I just joined. I think I understand the whole bidding process. But I've always wondered how sellers acquire certain items being sold, especially if they've stockpiled the merchandise in quantity. For instance, who are these people selling the Skinceuticals C + E ferulic serum samples? Are they perhaps greedy dermatologists who received a large quantity of samples intended for patients? If not, and the samples were purchased by the sellers, why can't I acquire the samples directly myself? One of the sellers says that the samples are NOT sealed and also do not come with an expiration date. I find that a bit unsettling. Any info you might have on this would be most helpful.

Also, you said in an earlier post that topical antioxidants aren´t that impressive and that a good sunscreen is much more protective against photodamage. You went on to say that the C + E ferulic gives a protection that equals spf 8 and that a sunscreen with spf 15 saves your skin from 55% of the free radicals, which no current topical antioxidant product can do. Are you saying that perhaps we shouldn't bother with antioxidants at all and instead focus totally on finding the best sunscreen?

Thanks for all the great info!

#104 sdxl

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 01:51 PM

Are you saying that perhaps we shouldn't bother with antioxidants at all and instead focus totally on finding the best sunscreen?

Not Frederik, but here is my view on it. Since sunscreens and antioxidants primarily work in different ways to protect against photodamage, there is no reason why you shouldn't use both. Sunscreen is the most important, because without UV there is no cascade of detrimental effects. But even the best sunscreens aren't capable preventing from all the UV reaching your skin, so antioxidants are a second line of defense. And some antioxidants have additional effects like stimulating collagen synthesis, etc., which is a positive thing.

#105 Fredrik

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 02:05 PM

Are you saying that perhaps we shouldn't bother with antioxidants at all and instead focus totally on finding the best sunscreen?

Sunscreen is the most important, because without UV there is no cascade of detrimental effects. But even the best sunscreens aren't capable preventing from all the UV reaching your skin, so antioxidants are a second line of defense. And some antioxidants have additional effects like stimulating collagen synthesis, etc., which is a positive thing.


Agree! When you´ve found a sunscreen you can use daily and re-apply at least once (about 4-5 hours after the first application, every 2 hours if in direct sunlight) and you started on a retinoid nightly THEN you can start with an topical antioxidant.

Sunscreen, retinoid and antioxidant, in order of importance.

But only one antioxidant, as far as I know, have directly increased synthesis of collagen (in vitro though). That is l-ascorbic acid, a regulator of collagen synthesis.

Luminous: Nothing wrong with these samples at all. I would never buy the original 30 ml bottle. The serum keeps fresher if stored in small bottles (the samples) that you use up over a couple of weeks = minimum contact with oxygen. The colour should be clear to light yellow (champagne). If it´s dark yellow it has oxidized (because l-ascorbic acid is a damn good antioxidant, that´s why it is so easily oxidized!)

Edited by fredrik, 04 September 2007 - 02:25 PM.


#106 luminous

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Posted 05 September 2007 - 12:51 AM

Thanks, sdxl & Fredrik. Fredrik, since you seem fairly certain that there is nothing wrong with the samples, I'm thinking that you must know more than I do about how the sellers typically acquire them. Agreed that the samples seem to be a bargain in terms of price and freshness compared with full size bottles. However, I'm still curious and wondering why I can't get the samples directly myself rather than depending on the ebay middleman. Any ideas on this? Thanks.

#107 Fredrik

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Posted 05 September 2007 - 11:32 AM

Thanks, sdxl & Fredrik.  Fredrik, since you seem fairly certain that there is nothing wrong with the samples, I'm thinking that you must know more than I do about how the sellers typically acquire them.  Agreed that the samples seem to be a bargain in terms of price and freshness compared with full size bottles.  However, I'm still curious and wondering why I can't get the samples directly myself rather than depending on the ebay middleman.  Any ideas on this?  Thanks.


I suppose you could get a sample by going to a "Med-SPA" or a dermatologist that sells skinceuticals. But why would they keep giving you samples for the rest of your life? You can´t officially buy them, the samples are not ment for selling.

#108 chipdouglas

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Posted 05 September 2007 - 10:20 PM

Frederik,

Would you be so kind as to tell me how long last a 20 G tube of Retin-A ?

#109 sdxl

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Posted 05 September 2007 - 11:25 PM

20 g of tretinoin cream does last me about 6 weeks with nightly use.

#110 chipdouglas

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Posted 06 September 2007 - 12:15 AM

20 g of tretinoin cream does last me about 6 weeks with nightly use.


Although somewhat irrelevant with my initial query ; have you been impressed with Retin-A's skin rejuvenating effects ?

Thanks

#111 sdxl

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Posted 06 September 2007 - 07:27 AM

20 g of tretinoin cream does last me about 6 weeks with nightly use.


Although somewhat irrelevant with my initial query ; have you been impressed with Retin-A's skin rejuvenating effects ?

Thanks

Can't say much about that.

#112 saxiephon

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Posted 07 September 2007 - 01:06 PM

Can anyone determine what plant antioxidant was used in the study below?

Antioxidant To Retard Wrinkles Discovered

Science Daily — A new method for fighting skin wrinkles has been developed at the Hebrew University Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Quality Sciences.

In her doctoral research at the university, Dr. Orit Bossi succeeded in isolating a plant-based antioxidant that delays the aging process by countering the breakdown of collagen fibers in the skin. Dr. Bossi conducted her research under the supervision of Zecharia Madar, the Karl Bach Professor of Agricultural Biochemistry at the Hebrew University, and Prof. Shlomo Grossman of Bar-Ilan University.

Antioxidants operate against free radicals which cause a breakdown of many tissues in the body, including the skin. When found in small quantities in the body, free radicals are not harmful and are even involved in various physical processes. When there is an excess of free radicals, however, as occurs during normal aging or as a result of excessive exposure to ultra-violet radiation from the sun, the result, among other things, is a breakdown of the collagen and elastin fibers in the skin. When this happens, there is a loss of skin elasticity and the formation of wrinkles.

"A problem with many of the commercial antioxidants found today in the market that are said to retard the aging process is that they oxidize quickly and therefore their efficiency declines with time," said Dr. Bossi. "Vitamin C, for example, oxidizes rapidly and is sensitive to high temperatures. This is also true of the antioxidant EGCG which is found in green tea, and vitamin E. As opposed to these, the antioxidant which I used in my research is able to withstand high temperatures, is soluble in water, and does not oxidize easily and thus remains effective over time."

Dr. Bossi is looking towards a new generation of cosmetic products which will not only combat wrinkles but will be more effective against deeper levels of skin wrinkles than current products. Dr. Bossi did not reveal the plant source she used to derive the antioxidant, since the research is in the process of being patented.

In her research, Dr. Bossi conducted experiments on mice skin tissue, which, she says, resembles that of humans. She applied her antioxidant on two skin cell groups -- those which had been exposed to the sun's rays and received her antioxidant and those which also had been exposed to sun but did not receive the antioxidant. The untreated cells showed a rise in free radicals causing wrinkles, while those cells which had been treated showed no significant increase in the free radicals level.

#113 chipdouglas

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Posted 07 September 2007 - 02:26 PM

Could it be Kinetin ? Cause kinetin is relevant to skin aging, well it's not being clearly shown yet, but it looks promising.

#114 chipdouglas

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Posted 07 September 2007 - 05:06 PM

I mentioned Kinetin, but I should have used the name of the substance itself : furfuryladenine instead.

#115 sentinel

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Posted 24 September 2007 - 09:07 AM

My Retin - A product (Tretinoin 0.05%) finally turned up and I have applied it 2 nights running. I was going to apply every 2-3 nights initially to avoid excessive irritation, redness etc but after night one I felt no tingling, dryness or redness. Still the same after night 2 so I'm just wondering if others have had a more noticable level of reaction/sides or if this is fairly common?

BTW I also got some factor 50 sunscreen with mexoryl SX and XL so I'm protecting against the increased photosensitivity, even if it does make me look like Caspar the friendly ghost!

Sentinel

#116 sdxl

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Posted 24 September 2007 - 12:07 PM

It can take a few days before the side effects kick in. The first time it took me 1 week of nightly use before my face became sensitive. And another week of use before the sensitivity went away, or at least was much more tolerable. Be sure to use only gentle products. I never experienced direct noticeable irritation from tretinoin.

#117 sentinel

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Posted 24 September 2007 - 12:10 PM

Thanks, that's interesting to hear.

When you say "sensitive" do you mean redness or stinging.. Also I assume you were upping your UVA/B blockers during the day?

#118 tintinet

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Posted 24 September 2007 - 01:37 PM

Years ago, I used retin-A regularly without sensitivity. After I had been using it for years (approximately 6) I developed apparent hypersensitivity/contact dermatitis with its use. This seemed to take at least 2-3 days to evolve following topical application.

I have since switched to tazorac/tazarotene gel without any irritation or reaction. Mild peeling in AM following PM topical application, but skin looks and feels better after using tazarotene.

#119 sentinel

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Posted 24 September 2007 - 01:44 PM

Bizzare! That's a long time to get sensitised. I suppose part of what I'm asking is if I am not experiencing any sides at all is it likely that the product is bogus (it is a generic called Retino by Janssen-Cilag (India)) or am I just lucky?

#120 sdxl

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Posted 24 September 2007 - 02:22 PM

Thanks, that's interesting to hear.

When you say "sensitive" do you mean redness or stinging.. Also I assume you were upping your UVA/B blockers during the day?

Sensitivity as in things that normally wouldn't sting do. Like sunscreen with alcohol. And yes there was some redness involved. I always use sunscreen during the day.




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