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Modulation of gene expression:


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#1 zoolander

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Posted 23 October 2007 - 04:02 PM


An interesting read. The following paper/abstract states that "to evaluate the anti-aging effects of potential agents researchers must first identify and be able to quantify epidermal markers that change with age" They then propose that by modulating the gene expression of these epidermal markers we can then elvulate the anti-aging efficacy of the skin care product

J Drugs Dermatol. 2007 Jun;6(6 Suppl):s25-33.

    Modulation of gene expression as a new skin anti-aging strategy.
   
Talbourdet S, Sadick NS, Lazou K, Bonnet-Duquennoy M, Kurfurst R, Neveu M, Heusèle C, André P, Schnebert S, Draelos ZD, Perrier E.

    LVMH Recherche - Parfums Christian Dior, St. Jean de Braye, France.

BACKROUND/OBJECTIVES: The signs of aging may originate from natural processes or from exposure to the sun, wind, or other environmental factors. To evaluate the anti-aging effects of potential agents researchers must first identify and be able to quantify epidermal markers that change with aging. This paper summarizes the results of studies conducted to evaluate the transcriptional effects of an Aframomum angustifolium seed extract and Malva Sylvestris extract, and the antiaging efficacy of a skin care product containing the Aframomum angustifolium seed extract.

METHODS: The transcriptional effect of an Aframomum angustifolium seed extract on normal human keratinocytes (NHKs) and normal human fibroblasts (NHF) was evaluated in vitro with the use of a low-density DNA array technology. The Malva Sylvestris extract was studied with a commercial DNA macroarray and by a real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The in vitro anti-aging activities of the Malva sylvestris extract were compared with those of all-trans retinoic acid (RA), a well-established topical therapy for photodamage and wrinkles. The genes studied were known to be modified by RA. The anti-aging efficacy of a facial skin care product containing Aframomum angustifolium seed extract was evaluated in a single-center study using image processing analysis and in a 2-center study by evaluation of the photographs by the investigator, independent evaluators, and subjects.

RESULTS: In general, the Aframomum angustifolium seed extract strongly modified the gene expression profiles of NHKs and weakly modified the gene expression profiles of NHFs. After incubation with Aframomum angustifolium seed extract, the expressions of 3 antioxidant genes (metallothionein 1, metallothionein 2, and thioredoxin) were increased in NHKs, while expressions of 1 antioxidant gene (glutathione peroxidase) was increased in NHFs. Concerning the Malva sylvestris extract, a cDNA macro-array technology experiment with the reconstructed human epidermis model showed that some genes modulated by treatment with the Malva sylvestris extract are also regulated by RA treatment indicating a similar activity at the mRNA level. In the single-center study, a facial skin care product containing the Aframomum angustifolium seed extract significantly improved the homogeneity of the skin. The areas of the detected objects (skin imperfections) decreased significantly on each studied area of the face and the variance decreased significantly over the entire face. In the 2-center study, 28% percent of the subjects reported a greater than 50% overall global improvement in their skin by the end of the study compared to 11% of the subjects after 4 weeks of treatment. Seventy-six percent of subjects said they would purchase the cream.

CONCLUSIONS: The authors developed a low-density DNA chip method that permitted the study of the transcriptional effect of Malva Sylvestris extract and of Aframomum angustrifolium seed extract. The gene expression profiles obtained demonstrate the anti-aging properties of these compounds. An in vivo single-center study, performed and analyzed with an assay based on image processing analysis, demonstrated the antiwrinkle activity of a formulation containing the Aframomum angustifolium seed extract. The data obtained in the 2-center study suggests that the cosmeceutical containing Aframomum angustifolium seed extract produces a global rejuvenation effect in terms of redness, pigmentation, and fine lines similar to that noted utilizing an intense pulse light source.

    PMID: 17691207 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


here's a before and after photo. the resulst are pretty dramatic

Posted Image

#2 zoolander

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Posted 23 October 2007 - 04:02 PM

Sorry but I do not seem to be able to find any products containing the above mentioned extracts.

Anyone??

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#3 Fredrik

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Posted 23 October 2007 - 05:20 PM

The research is done by the designer brand Dior labs. It is this cream, Capture Totale, that the eternally youthful and slutty (in a crazy, good way) Sharon Stone is promoting:

http://www.amazon.co...760911&s=beauty

I don´t wanna pee on your parade here ;) but I´m not terribly impressed by Diors pseudo-scientific babble. I´ve read the other abstract by Dior concerning sirtuin activation in cell culture and they use the same trick in both papers. Mixing in vitro results on cell culture with an in vivo test of the commercial cream.

First they lay out a scientifically sound theory and test the extracts on cell culture. Then they test a cream with the extract on women and report positive changes that any moisturizer could produce (increased hydration, better texture etc).

Remember that they never showed that their creams actives penetrated beneath the stratum corneum, they never produced a punch biopsy showing the transcriptional effect of an Aframomum angustifolium seed extract on human skin. No histologic findings what so ever.

Same thing in the other paper, they never showed sirtuin activation IN VIVO, on the human subjects. Just in cell culture in their labs. They want to associate their high-end moisturizer with tests on cell culture.

If they can´t show that their actives reach the epidermis or the dermis and if they don´t show actual histological changes in the human subjects skin...then none of these papers matter. The skin is more complex than a petri dish.

Diors Capture Totale Multi-Perfection Correction Serum

Ingredients
Aqua (Water), Cyclopentasiloxane, Butylene Glycol, Polymethyl Methacrylate, Diglycerin, Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride, Glycerin, Alcohol, Polysorbate 20, Dimethicone/Vinyl Dimethicone Crosspolymer, Cetearyl Ethylhexanoate, Propylene Glycol, Polyacrylamide, Hydrolyzed Soy Flour, Sorbitol, C13-14 Isoparaffin, Parfum (Fragrance), Methylparaben, Tocopheryl Acetate, Algin, Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Protein, Phenoxyethanol, Chlorphenesin, Acrylates/C10-30 Alkyl Acrylate Crosspolymer, Tromethamine, Faex (Yeast Extract), Calcium Pantetheine Sulfonate, Polyvinyl Alcohol, Malva Sylvestris (Mallow) Extract, Laureth-7, Sodium Hyaluronate, Xanthan Gum, Carbomer, Iris Florentina Root Extract, Cellulose Gum, Chlorhexidine Digluconate, Hydrolyzed Adansonia Digitata Extract, Glycyrrhiza Glabra (Licorice) Extract, Hydrolyzed Soy Protein, Aframomum Angustifolium Seed Extract, Oenothera Biennis (Evening Primrose) Root Extract, Potentilla Erecta Root Extract, Plankton Extract, Palmitoyl Pentapeptide-3, Butylphenyl Methylpropional, Zinc Sulfate, Limonene, Alpha-Isomethyl Ionone, Ethylparaben, Butylparaben, Citronellol, Geraniol, Diacetyl Boldine, Propylparaben, Retinyl Palmitate, Linalool, Isobutylparaben, Sodium Metabisulfite, CI 14700 (Red 4), BHT, Tocopherol.
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#4 zoolander

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Posted 23 October 2007 - 06:00 PM

yes yes. I saw that the study was conducted in Dior Consumer labs. Of course that started a few alarm bell. I do think modulation of gene expression could be an effective treatment with aging skin. Most of the papers I have been reading have some sort skin care company involved. I haven't really got much to go at the moment to tell you the truth fredrik.

I know there is a lot of decent stuff out there about retinoids but I thought I'd try and keep most of the science based on compounds that do not need prescriptions

#5 zoolander

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Posted 23 October 2007 - 06:01 PM

I have to admit that when I saw the above before and after shot I thought "Bullshit". That's a pretty dramatic change for 2 months don't you think

#6 Fredrik

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Posted 23 October 2007 - 06:34 PM

I have to admit that when I saw the above before and after shot I thought "Bullshit". That's a pretty dramatic change for 2 months don't you think


Yes it is. It looks like she went through a series of glycolic acid peels and maybe used a retinoid in conjunction. She has that sheen and smoothness.

I know there is a lot of decent stuff out there about retinoids but I thought I'd try and keep most of the science based on compounds that do not need prescriptions


I understand. I´m sorry to say that the cosmetic industry is filled to the brim with junk science, that´s not your fault.

There is a non-prescription retinoid called RETINALDEHYDE that is patented and commercially available by a french pharmaceutical company called Avéne. It is a retinoic acid precursor, much much weaker than prescription retinoids but paired with glycolic or salicylic acids it will produce noticeable results over time.

Retinol has to be enzymatically converted into retinaldehyde in human skin before it can do anything positive. On pubmed there is a mix of animal and human experiments on retinaldehyde. But Avene is behind most of the human studies so...it´s hard not to be a skeptic in the world of cosmetic chemistry.

I´ll post the first abstract, It´s sort of an overview:

Retinoids in cosmeceuticals.Sorg O, Antille C, Kaya G, Saurat JH.
Clinique de Dermatologie, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland. olivier.sorg@hcuge.ch

Retinoids are natural and synthetic vitamin A derivatives. They are lipophilic molecules and easily penetrate the epidermis. Their biologically active forms can modulate the expression of genes involved in cellular differentiation and proliferation. Retinoic acid (tretinoin), its 13-cis isomer isotretinoin, as well as various synthetic retinoids are used for therapeutic purposes, whereas retinaldehyde, retinol, and retinyl esters, because of their controlled conversion to retinoic acid or their direct receptor-independent biologic action, can be used as cosmeceuticals. These natural retinoic acid precursors are thus expected to be helpful in (i) renewing epidermal cells, (ii) acting as UV filters, (iii) preventing oxidative stress, (iv) controlling cutaneous bacterial flora, and (v) improving skin aging and photoaging. Retinol and retinyl esters are not irritant, whereas demonstrating only a modest clinical efficiency. On the other hand, retinaldehyde, which is fairly well tolerated, seems to be the most efficient cosmeceutical retinoid; it has significant efficiency toward oxidative stress, cutaneous bacterial flora, epidermis renewing, and photoaging.

PMID: 17014484

http://www.ncbi.nlm....Pubmed_RVDocSum

http://www.ncbi.nlm....Pubmed_RVDocSum

http://www.ncbi.nlm....Pubmed_RVDocSum
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#7 zoolander

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Posted 23 October 2007 - 07:17 PM

Could I possibly ask for your retinoid source in India?

#8 Fredrik

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Posted 23 October 2007 - 07:27 PM

Could I possibly ask for your retinoid source in India?


Absolutely. I mentioned it in my original post even though I didn´t know if it was ok to provide an URL.

I order Taz from:

http://alldaychemist.com/

http://www.alldayche...Tazarotene.html

Beware of the very long shipping time. I think it took nearly six weeks last time. They ship it to england first If I´m not wrong. It feels like drug trafficking! Which it is.

#9 zoolander

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Posted 23 October 2007 - 07:30 PM

So how do you get it through. I know there are loopholes for some medications. Is this the case for Taz?

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#10 Fredrik

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Posted 23 October 2007 - 07:48 PM

So how do you get it through. I know there are loopholes for some medications. Is this the case for Taz?


I don´t know how they do it. I´ll check the package more carefully this time and see what they declare it as. I´ve only ordered from them once. This is the second time but I haven´t received my shipment yet so it is to early to tell if it will get through. A friend of mine ordered from them (and it got through), they said that if a shipment get caught they´ll resend it.

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#11 Fredrik

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Posted 23 October 2007 - 07:51 PM

Swedish laws on drug import says that if you have a prescription written on the foreign drug then the customs can´t take it. But It´ll be hard to find a MD here who knows about the anti-aging effects of taz. It´s originally a psoriasis medication.




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