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Do You Think You Will Make It?


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145 replies to this topic

Poll: Do you think you will "live long enough to live forever"? (201 member(s) have cast votes)

Do you think you will live to see the technological revolutions that will grant you the choice of living indefinitely, or you think cryonics is your best hope?

  1. I will definitely make it. In a few decades, treatments needed to extend my lifespan dramatically will show up. (51 votes [23.18%])

    Percentage of vote: 23.18%

  2. My best hope lays with cryonics; by the time i die it will have developed a lot more. (14 votes [6.36%])

    Percentage of vote: 6.36%

  3. Voted I think that i have a really high chance of making it, either with treatemtns coming up in my lifespan or with cryonics, which could be much more developed by the time i die. (63 votes [28.64%])

    Percentage of vote: 28.64%

  4. I don't think there's much hope for me; in the next decades not much new stuff will come up and i'm very skeptic about any chance of cryonics working. (15 votes [6.82%])

    Percentage of vote: 6.82%

  5. I will probably not make it, neither with new treatments nor with cryonics. But i think my children/grandchildren will. (24 votes [10.91%])

    Percentage of vote: 10.91%

  6. We will never get to be able to life indefinitely. We will most likely destroy the environment/ourselves first. (19 votes [8.64%])

    Percentage of vote: 8.64%

  7. Voted I have definitely no idea. (21 votes [9.55%])

    Percentage of vote: 9.55%

  8. Why would i want to live more than i currently do? I don't care about this issue, death is a natural part of life and i'm fine with it. (7 votes [3.18%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.18%

  9. I don't know and i don't care. Whatever happens is fine. I'll just row with it and won't expend much energy at gettong to have an extended lifespan, even though it could be nice to live a few more centuries. (6 votes [2.73%])

    Percentage of vote: 2.73%

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#1 forever freedom

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Posted 01 December 2007 - 03:41 AM


I just want to summarize and see what are people's opinions here. I hope each one explains why he believes this or that so we can get better explained points of view. I think i basically covered all opinions i remember of having heard. I probably missed some; if your opinion isn't there just check the one that sounds more like you the most between these 9.

And one last question. What do you guys think are your particular odds of making it?

Edited by sam988, 01 December 2007 - 03:45 AM.


#2 gashinshotan

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Posted 01 December 2007 - 03:45 AM

I picked two:

"Why would i want to live more than i currently do? I don't care about this issue, death is a natural part of life and i'm fine with it." and "We will never get to be able to life indefinitely. We will most likely destroy the environment/ourselves first." I really don't fear death because I see it as a normal part of life and been in so many near-death encounters that I'm expecting it to happen.

#3 niner

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Posted 01 December 2007 - 04:12 AM

I picked two:

"Why would i want to live more than i currently do? I don't care about this issue, death is a natural part of life and i'm fine with it." and "We will never get to be able to life indefinitely. We will most likely destroy the environment/ourselves first." I really don't fear death because I see it as a normal part of life and been in so many near-death encounters that I'm expecting it to happen.

I have to say, gashinshotan, that it seems odd that you hang out at the "Immortality Institute". Not that we don't love you, but I'm just sayin'...

I voted for nothing, because I fall between "high chance" and "not much chance". I think that I have a modest chance. Probably even more modest than I believe, but it makes me happy to think that way...

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#4 Bruce Klein

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Posted 01 December 2007 - 04:16 AM

Vote: I think that i have a really high chance of making it, either with treatments coming up in my lifespan or with cryonics, which could be much more developed by the time i die.

#5 DJS

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Posted 01 December 2007 - 04:37 AM

I didn't vote.

My answer to this poll question would be: *possibly*.

I'm too intellectually honest with myself to extend my position beyond the claim of logical possibility. Forunately, my conceptual framework doesn't require any leaps of faith.

#6 Cyberbrain

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Posted 01 December 2007 - 04:45 AM

The fact that I still have 80-90 some more years to live (in terms of aging), I definitely think there would be some kind of break through to make me immortal.

#7 Athan

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Posted 01 December 2007 - 04:57 AM

I have no idea, but I sincerely doubt it. While great progress has been made and will be made, it is rather extreme to expect a high probability of success just off of hype and hopeful news. Wait a few decades and ask again...

#8 infundibulum

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Posted 01 December 2007 - 05:14 AM

I voted for:

I think that i have a really high chance of making it, either with treatments coming up in my lifespan or with cryonics, which could be much more developed by the time i die.

But I don't think there is a high chance - more like 50-50 because of the possibility of accidental death.

#9 cyborgdreamer

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Posted 01 December 2007 - 05:41 AM

I'm somewhere between 'There isn't much hope for me' and 'I have no idea'.

I desperately hope I can survive, but I just don't have the evidence to assume that I will. For me, the only thing worse then living a life knowing I'd die would be thinking I'd live forever and being wrong.

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#10 treonsverdery

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Posted 01 December 2007 - 07:13 AM

Item

Edited by treonsverdery, 01 December 2007 - 07:12 PM.


#11 Infernity

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Posted 01 December 2007 - 04:18 PM

Not certain but likely to make it.

#12 Karomesis

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Posted 01 December 2007 - 04:29 PM

the argument could be made that basic treatments are already here in the form of cutting edge supps, and stem cell treatments. so when people say " a few decades away" I really have no idea what they're talking about.

Do you mean to say a more advanced form of what we currently have? or are you referring to nanobots? IMHO, any form of attack on the SENS deadly seven represents a chipping away at the foundation of the aging process. AGE inhibitors and breakers represent one form of this, as do supps like NtBHA , SRT-501,and STAZN. don't forget stem cell treatments with adipose derived cells (cell loss) .

I'm almost certain I'm going to make it, barring a catastrophic accident or other form of unwelcome violence. I will stop at absolutely nothing to extend my lifespan. If that means making myself a testbed for new technologies, then so be it.

#13 caston

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Posted 01 December 2007 - 04:33 PM

I gave the first option my tick of approval. The future is created today and the only way to achieve the impossible is to imagine how it may be possible.

Edited by caston, 01 December 2007 - 04:35 PM.

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#14 forever freedom

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Posted 01 December 2007 - 07:14 PM

I checked this one: "I think that i have a really high chance of making it, either with treatemtns coming up in my lifespan or with cryonics, which could be much more developed by the time i die."


I believe that even if i die, and currently there are good odds i do, I get cryogenically suspended and eventually will be revived. I think it's very hard that in the future there won't come any techniques for reviving the ones that are suspended, even if it takes thousands of years. The fact that the cryonics field is growing -at a slow rate, but groing nevertheless- means that there is a certain security that companies like Alcor won't go bankrupt any time soon. Even if they do get near financial ruin, there will be wealthy patients that will help them (hopefully i will be one of them; by the time i die i hope i will pass a lot of money to the company i gfet suspended in, by creating some kind of post mortem fund, and i plan on building a higher security so that people who are suspended can sleep without worries :biggrin: ).


But that's all just speculation. Maybe a major comet will hit us first, or we will blow ourselves up, or the cryonics companies will eventually go bankrupt somehow (hopefully, if that happens, there will be public/government/scientific interest in keeping those who are suspended, suspended. Why would they? Wouldn't it be nice if we could bring someone from centuries or even thousands of years ago to our times? We could learn a lot from them). But in the case a major disaster happens, even if we stayed alive for hundreds of years, it wouldn't make much difference in the end; we would die anyways, cryogenically suspended or not.

#15 AdamSummerfield

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 12:04 AM

I voted:

I definately have no idea.

Left to myself, I will make it, but due to the actions of careless others, I may not.
Who is to say that I am not killed in my fathers car tomorrow by another driver as he drives me to visit Biopunk?

I picked two:

"Why would i want to live more than i currently do? I don't care about this issue, death is a natural part of life and i'm fine with it." and "We will never get to be able to life indefinitely. We will most likely destroy the environment/ourselves first." I really don't fear death because I see it as a normal part of life and been in so many near-death encounters that I'm expecting it to happen.


This would explain your most erratic and in some cases slightly offensive behaviour about the forums.

#16 gashinshotan

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 12:09 AM

I voted:

I definately have no idea.

Left to myself, I will make it, but due to the actions of careless others, I may not.
Who is to say that I am not killed in my fathers car tomorrow by another driver as he drives me to visit Biopunk?

I picked two:

"Why would i want to live more than i currently do? I don't care about this issue, death is a natural part of life and i'm fine with it." and "We will never get to be able to life indefinitely. We will most likely destroy the environment/ourselves first." I really don't fear death because I see it as a normal part of life and been in so many near-death encounters that I'm expecting it to happen.


This would explain your most erratic and in some cases slightly offensive behaviour about the forums.


I apologize. I have a poor understanding of the English language :(.

#17 forever freedom

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 12:13 AM

I voted:

I definately have no idea.

Left to myself, I will make it, but due to the actions of careless others, I may not.
Who is to say that I am not killed in my fathers car tomorrow by another driver as he drives me to visit Biopunk?

I picked two:

"Why would i want to live more than i currently do? I don't care about this issue, death is a natural part of life and i'm fine with it." and "We will never get to be able to life indefinitely. We will most likely destroy the environment/ourselves first." I really don't fear death because I see it as a normal part of life and been in so many near-death encounters that I'm expecting it to happen.


This would explain your most erratic and in some cases slightly offensive behaviour about the forums.


I apologize. I have a poor understanding of the English language :(.



Heheh this is an easy way of evading responsability isn't it. I also saw some of your posts, and no your problem is not a "poor understanding of the english language", which you seem to handle well enough.

Edited by sam988, 02 December 2007 - 12:14 AM.


#18 gashinshotan

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 12:23 AM

I voted:

I definately have no idea.

Left to myself, I will make it, but due to the actions of careless others, I may not.
Who is to say that I am not killed in my fathers car tomorrow by another driver as he drives me to visit Biopunk?

I picked two:

"Why would i want to live more than i currently do? I don't care about this issue, death is a natural part of life and i'm fine with it." and "We will never get to be able to life indefinitely. We will most likely destroy the environment/ourselves first." I really don't fear death because I see it as a normal part of life and been in so many near-death encounters that I'm expecting it to happen.


This would explain your most erratic and in some cases slightly offensive behaviour about the forums.


I apologize. I have a poor understanding of the English language :(.



Heheh this is an easy way of evading responsability isn't it. I also saw some of your posts, and no your problem is not a "poor understanding of the english language", which you seem to handle well enough.


I was referring to poor understanding in the colloquial sense - I can't seem to use the appropriate words for the appropriate readers. I guess that is to be expected after reading hundreds of dry, historical and biological books. Reading to much will distort your values and your mind.

#19 Luna

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 04:47 AM

I'm somewhere between 'There isn't much hope for me' and 'I have no idea'.

I desperately hope I can survive, but I just don't have the evidence to assume that I will. For me, the only thing worse then living a life knowing I'd die would be thinking I'd live forever and being wrong.



Howcome you think there is no hope for you?

#20 John Schloendorn

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 05:07 AM

If I thought I was likely to make it, hanging out here is just about the last thing I'd do ;-)
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#21 forever freedom

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 05:09 AM

If I thought I was likely to make it, hanging out here is just about the last thing I'd do ;-)



Why?? What would you be doing then?

#22 John Schloendorn

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 05:35 AM

Sit on rocks in sunny threshold countries and look at water.

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#23 eternaltraveler

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 06:04 AM

i'm going to make it

don't know about the rest of you....

:wink:

#24 eternaltraveler

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 06:06 AM

Sit on rocks in sunny threshold countries and look at water.

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#25 John Schloendorn

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 06:34 AM

Hehe grr ;-)

#26 cyborgdreamer

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 06:57 AM

I'm somewhere between 'There isn't much hope for me' and 'I have no idea'.

I desperately hope I can survive, but I just don't have the evidence to assume that I will. For me, the only thing worse then living a life knowing I'd die would be thinking I'd live forever and being wrong.



Howcome you think there is no hope for you?


There's a big difference between no hope and not much hope. :wink: Life extention technologies probably will be developed eventually but I'm highly skeptical of timeline predictions. Historically, people have never been very good at predicting the future. Plus, life extention carries a huge emotional bias; death is so psychologically aversive that people construct elaborate ways of dealing with it (e.g. afterlife fantasies, death as a 'natural part of life'). I find it far too convienient that these futurists place life extention technology comfortably within their own life spans.

Don't get me wrong, I certainly hope I'm mistaken. And I will fight with everything I have for a chance at immortality. However, I can't afford to let my own biases get the better of me. I don't want to be like the countless religious believers and immortality seekers who only believed what was comforting.

#27 abolitionist

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 08:09 AM

I picked two:

"Why would i want to live more than i currently do? I don't care about this issue, death is a natural part of life and i'm fine with it." and "We will never get to be able to life indefinitely. We will most likely destroy the environment/ourselves first." I really don't fear death because I see it as a normal part of life and been in so many near-death encounters that I'm expecting it to happen.


We tend to rationalize that which we believe we are powerless to prevent. Given the choice, people generally choose to fix the various health problems as they occur when able...

Avoiding death is also a "natural part of life"

Edited by abolitionist, 02 December 2007 - 08:11 AM.

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#28 gashinshotan

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 08:21 AM

I picked two:

"Why would i want to live more than i currently do? I don't care about this issue, death is a natural part of life and i'm fine with it." and "We will never get to be able to life indefinitely. We will most likely destroy the environment/ourselves first." I really don't fear death because I see it as a normal part of life and been in so many near-death encounters that I'm expecting it to happen.


We tend to rationalize that which we believe we are powerless to prevent. Given the choice, people generally choose to fix the various health problems as they occur when able...

Avoiding death is also a "natural part of life"


For me it is both a rationalization and a part of my nature. I tend to dive right into things and take risks which lead to drastic changes and even the threat of death and bodily harm. I thrive off the suspense of pushing the limits of my body, vehicles, people, and activities so I have necessarily accepted death in order for me to experience life.

#29 Ghostrider

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 08:29 AM

I really don't fear death because I see it as a normal part of life and been in so many near-death encounters that I'm expecting it to happen.


I never could understand this logic, why do assume that whatever happens in nature is good? What about natural disasters or wild fires? These things are natural, but people do not desire them.
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#30 TrekkieMan

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 12:10 PM

I really don't fear death because I see it as a normal part of life and been in so many near-death encounters that I'm expecting it to happen.


I never could understand this logic, why do assume that whatever happens in nature is good? What about natural disasters or wild fires? These things are natural, but people do not desire them.


Nature is morally neutral. Any natural act probably has both good and bad consequences.




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