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Quantum Archeology


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#1 eldras

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 08:43 AM


Hi I'm new here so i'll cut and poste something that isn't riddled with dyslexia for which I apologise in advance in future posts, if there is a future:

This is going to get wiped from wiki & it's a pity to waste it:



Quantum Archeology - also known as quantum information retrieval, is a controversial and emerging idea about information retrieval in transhumanist and futurist philosophy written and debated about (see 'Notes' below) at universities and in books and on forums like Ray Kurzweil's MINDX. One of it's most acute theories describes a possible method for raising the ancient dead using advancing statistical quantum calculations by treating a person as a data set at a defined point of spacetime and seeking to accurately describe that point - then reconstruct them.


It anticipates coming process technologies usually called hypercomputing that include, but are not limited to quantum computing, nanocomputing, and light speed computing and it attempts to look at resurrection issues in terms of information manipulation, in a world that has post-human level intelligence (assumed to occur at more than 10^17 flops (Hans Moravec).

It first surfaced in 2002 in discussions about Tipler's The Physics of Immortality and Steven Wolfram's A New Kind of Mathematics, using the forecasting ideas of new statistics, ideas from fiction and with a focal point called the Omega Point by Pierre Teilihard De Chardin, a Jesuit priest, and Tipler, a professor of mathematics.

Supporters include Frank Tipler and opponents Robert Ettinger, and it was discussed at the Pentagon sponsored AI@50 in the USA in 2006.

The idea was inspired by Asimov's Foundation trilogy where Hari Seldon makes aggregate probabilistic predictions using psychohistory across thousands of years.


The basis of psychohistory is the idea that, while the actions of a particular individual could not be foreseen, the laws of statistics could be applied to large groups of people and used to predict the general flow of future events.

Quantum Archeology does it backwards, ie uses statistical methods to determine the past at quantum level detail, instead of the future.

It is well written about under specialist headings as information theory, and the resurrections of the dead is one of the most bizarre applications of quantum forecasting.

The idea advances that it is possible to reconstruct the exact states of any event (philosophy) of spacetime, enabling the resurrection of any person, including the memories of any person, when no phsyical part of them is remains extant. Is is based on the view that the cosmos is entirely subject to law and past movements are therefore definable and reconfigurable.

Asimov used the analogy of a gas: in a gas, the motion of a single molecule is very difficult to predict, but the mass action of the gas can be predicted to a high level of accuracy -known in physics as the Kinetic Theory.

Quantum archeology is the opposite of psychohistory and is an attempt at ideating method to prepare for the science of how those predictions are made, including methods like sampling(probability) and is in its infancy.

It assumes the cosmos is a determinist system and it therefore follows it is possible to describe any history with enough processing power leading to resurrection by future techniques.

Frank J. Tipler immediately supported the idea in 2003 and his letter was published on MINDX, although he saw raising the dead as three dimensional resurrectees as unnecessary because computer simulation will be the same thing.

"You are indeed correct that this is possible because the current universe has limited complexity....the complexity of the visible universe today is bounded above by 10^{123} bits of information. It is indeed correct that the 2nd law of thermodynamics applies to the universe as a whole. In fact, the Second Law is essential in the proof that the laws of physics REQUIRE the computer capacity of the universe to increase without limit."
Like archeology which is able to reconstruct objects from ancient times using surviving fragments, knowledge about similar objects, and probabilities, quantum archeology assumes future computing power like quantum computers will enable this by back tracing, using laws of cause and effect with emerging mathematical and statistical methods.

There are always more variables in the cosmos than there were is history allowing enough information to be gathered to reconstruct any historical event down to the quantum particle. The universe is becoming increasing complex and any group of variables should plot backwards to a time when there are fewer events.


Everett's Many World's Theory implies that many future worlds will have only a few common ancestors. Moreover, a s time advances, the number of events in the cosmos multiplies allowing checking of back tracing from different variables to common roots. Therefore enough variables will exist at any future time to resurrect any past event in infinite or near infinite worlds.


Quantum Archeology further holds that no event in the cosmos can be non-determined, just complex, and makes no special conditions for human beings or any observers.




The idea was first discussed on line in the kurzweilai forums in 2002, where it was initially regarded as a pseudoscience, but began to be taken seriously and received endorsement from eminent scientists like Frank J. Tipler and written about (see Notes below) as quantum resurrection.


Critics of the theory include Professor Robert Ettinger, who thinks there may be some special property of a human body not knowable by mapping.

Another criticism of the theory is that entropy causes irretrievable information loss at death and therefore resurrection would breech the second law of thermodynamics.


Quantum archaeologists retort that entropy does not imply abstract chaos but presently unmeasurable complexity.

Religious objections include the belief human beings operate by different laws to the rest of the universe which was a challenge made to Everett's Many Worlds Theory.


Another objection is that a computer-aided resurrection may not produce the same real person. Cyonics founder Professor Robert Ettinger in 2007 wrote on quantum archeology:

"...it may eventually be possible to simulate as large a portion of spacetime as desired, to any desired degree of accuracy. But that does not necessarily mean that a simulated person would be alive in our sense, i.e. capable of having subjective experiences....In extreme brevity, because the map is not the territory. A simulation is a description of a thing and not the thing itself."


Some philosophers have criticized transhumanism on the grounds that it is an attempt at a religion since both posit immortality, resurrection description of the universe, and through the Simulation Argument, a creator, but transhumanist's absence of of a subjective valuation system for Man except as an object, is dangerous.

Extropians rebuff this by asserting the theory is intensely humanist and values Man so much it attempts a survival strategy for the dead as well as the living.


Debates occur about the nature of identity such as those discussed in The Prospect of Immortality, and by the philosopher Professor Derek Parfit; the computing capacity needed, and the social and legal difficulties of raising the dead.

Moore's Law and other trends published by Kurzweil indicate when there will be enough processing power to achieve simulations complex enough to map out a world, and it is expected that a 200 Qubit quantum computer may be able to do this (30 Qubits would match todays supercomputer, and D-Wave Systems claims to have built a 16 Qubit system).

It is assumed that singularity technology and Artificial General Intelligence will be required to model enough of the local universe to simulate any human being and many futurists including Vernor Vinge and Ray Kuzweil expect that by 2030.







[edit] See Also





[edit] Notes
& sources dealing with the topic by other names

1964 "The Future of Man" Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (
Omega Point theory) ISBN 0-385-51072-1

1993 "The Coming Technological Singularity", Verner Vinge. Symposium held at NASA Lewis Research Center (NASA Conference Publication CP-10129)

1995 "The Physics of Immortality" Prof Frank J Tiper. ISBN 0333618645

1998 "Time and history in quantum tunneling" in Superlattices and Microstructures, Volume 23, Number 3, March pp. 823-832(10) A.M.Steinberg

2000 Sub-Poissonian photon statistics of higher harmonics: quantum predictions via classical trajectories Jirí Bajer et al 2000 J. Opt. B: Quantum Semiclass. Opt. 2 L10-L14 doi:10.1088/1464-4266/2/3/102

2002 "Psychohistory" (A tool for Historical Prediction) by Christos Z. Konstas ISBN : 960-7928-72-5.

2003 "Are You Living In a Computer Simulation?" Nick Bostrom. Philosophical Quarterly, Vol. 53, No. 211, pp. 243-255.

2005 "The Singularity Is Near" Ray Kurzweil ISBN 0-670-03384-7.

2005 Quantum Archeology Wed 7 Dec Vlatko Vedral Manchester Theoretical Physics Group SCHUSTER COLLOQUIUM. (see also eg Vlatko Vedral deposited papers Los Alamos http://xxx.lanl.gov/find/ on quantum information recovery (same principle as quantum resurrection).

2006 "Information recovery from black holes" by Vijay Balasubramanian, Donald Marolf, Moshe Rozali in General Relativity and Gravitation pub by Springer Netherlands ISSN 0001-7701 (Print) 1572-9532 (Online) Issue Volume 38, Number 11 / November

2006 "A Beginner's Guide to Immortality:" Extraordinary People, Alien Brains, and Quantum Resurrection by Clifford A. Pickover ISBN-13: 9781560259848.

2007 New Scientist article on C.A. Pickover's book (above) Nov 17th.

2007 "The Never-Ending Days of Being Dead: Dispatches from the Front Line of Science" Faber and Faber by Marcus Chown ISBN: 057122055X

2008 "How much of one-way computation is just thermodynamics?" Janet Anders, Damian Markham, Vlatko Vedral, Michal Hajdušek January 21st, arXiv:quant-ph/0702020v1

Psychohistory.org

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia....ntum_Archeology"

#2 Karomesis

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 04:55 PM

some impressive posting Eldras.

you're in good company here. ;)

#3 maestro949

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 06:07 PM

When you ponder these thought experiments and realize that they are theoretically possible thought presently intractable, it makes longevity look fairly simple regarding the information that is required.

By simply moving the decimal place over a few points for the precision within certain technologies we should be able to reconstruct fully working cells and organs relatively soon. From there it's just a matter of designing mechanisms to make the necessary adjustments to the machinery.

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#4 bgwowk

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 07:40 PM

You seem to have combined several different ideas under one label, and missed some history. As far as I know, the idea of reconstructing people from information left behind in the universe began with Fyodorov in the 19th century

http://en.wikipedia....rovich_Fyodorov

I am not aware of Asimov's psychohistory inspiring any of it.

Ideas for reconstructing past events and people based on computational reversal of classical particle trajectories need to be distinguished from quantum mechanical approaches. Even if quantum mechanics were not a factor, the classical approach is now known to be unworkable even in principle because of chaos.

Archeological approaches need to be further distinguished from brute-force computational approaches that simply seek to recreate all possible people in all possible universes using diverging computing power. The Omega Point is an example.

There is a book called Forever For All by Mike Perry that reviews all these ideas. Everyone needs to understand that ideas seeking to put Universal Resurrection on a scientific foundation are extremely far-fetched, even by transhumanist standards.

Edited by bgwowk, 12 February 2008 - 07:44 PM.


#5 maestro949

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 09:01 PM

Even if quantum mechanics were not a factor, the classical approach is now known to be unworkable even in principle because of chaos.


The problem here is that it's possible that Chaos doesn't exist. Apparent randomness doesn't equate to true randomness as you can never truly measure any observation with specific precision for setting initial conditions. The notion that an initial condition can be specified is flawed as there will always be a rounding error of these values. We lack this information to answer this basic question "Does chaos exist?" and it's possible that we always will.

#6 eldras

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 09:36 PM

[quote name='bgwowk' date='12-Feb 2008, 02:40 PM' post='223894']
As far as I know, the idea of reconstructing people from information left behind in the universe began with Fyodorov in the 19th century

http://en.wikipedia....rovich_Fyodorov



Thanks for Feodorov. Crikey what read. I heard a memory of him way back but I see with joy he is is amazing! What a refence...thanks enormously! I was only trying to do a stub at wiki.

I am not aware of Asimov's psychohistory inspiring any of it.

Yes Asimov incited the psychohistory movements from Foundation

http://www.psychohistory.org/


#Ideas for reconstructing past events and people based on computational reversal of classical particle trajectories need to be distinguished from quantum mechanical approaches.#

I agree that would be useful. And I also see that the aim of resurrection of the ,ong dead will naturally subvert every discipline to it's aim
and combine or chuck away anything necessary.

There are probably very manys of calculating the past points in space time.

I'm not a fan of chaos theory if that's what your advancing? Chaos is a biblical idea when they couldn't find an explanation for things.

Small things make big changes and the sysetm is too complex or myterious in some other way to analyse?

No No that doesn't work for me! Nor of nonlinear theories. That doesn't mean there cant be simualtaneous events with different causes that interact in ways that are presently unknown to us.

But that's just complexity.



Quantum mechanics too is determinist with Many Worlds, but even with sorce theory which I looked at today it follows laws, and once there are laws thiere is predicitabilty.

##Archeological approaches need to be further distinguished from brute-force computational approaches that simply seek to recreate all possible people in all possible universes using diverging computing power.##


Oh absoutely.

But one can also put a request into the brute force approach to select appropriate paths by eg defining what a search/breeding genetic algorithm tanks should do, where to junction etc so it's SOME brute force and SOME guides.



#The Omega Point is an example.#

Yep true enough.

##There is a book called Forever For All by Mike Perry that reviews all these ideas. Everyone needs to understand that ideas seeking to put Universal Resurrection on a scientific foundation are extremely far-fetched, even by transhumanist standards.##



Well I haven't read the book yet, but I absolutely dispute QA is far fetched though to answer your challenge I would need ONE reason at a time why you think it seems so for you.
While I loved speculative ideas, I'm only into ones that are practical & possible, and also as cheap and as simple as can be.

I go flash readPerry's book but if it demonstrates why QA is far fetched or far off, -rather than ...I'll stuck my neck out here... a failure of invention methodology and imagination....I'll eat my hat (it's wool)

Message Einstein pinned over his door at Princeton:

"Imagination is more important than knowledge."


One can of course dismiss it as a glib one liner, but not from him... in that special position ....not THERE!

It must mean someting profound for the true searcher.

Imagination is something learnable, as I am finding out that science is to my amazement.

Re: methods taking ages:

I would have agreed with you until I began by chance to attend serious stats meetings and look at what they'd been playing with.

And then also the construction of what's being done in [[A.G.I.]] which I've looked at in far more detail see www.agi-08.org


I think there are real short cuts demonstrably available like setting up seed A.I. for asymtotic machine intelligence with a containment protocol.
A rapid build is surely achievable, and there are really great maths and other admin techniques to move very quickley to post human systems of a general naute, as we already have post human systems of specific natures.


I feel handicapped at this point as I'm engaged on a build and it's classified, which is the oppposite of what free science debates are about.

Well met!

#7 bgwowk

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 11:32 PM

Even if quantum mechanics were not a factor, the classical approach is now known to be unworkable even in principle because of chaos.


The problem here is that it's possible that Chaos doesn't exist. Apparent randomness doesn't equate to true randomness as you can never truly measure any observation with specific precision for setting initial conditions. The notion that an initial condition can be specified is flawed as there will always be a rounding error of these values. We lack this information to answer this basic question "Does chaos exist?" and it's possible that we always will.

The extreme sensitivity of certain classical systems to initial conditions is an established mathematical fact. This means that the macroscopic behavior of certain systems becomes ever more sensitive to ever finer details of initial conditions as time progresses, making prediction of certain aspects of future behavior impossible with any finite knowledge of initial conditions. Chaos is not random, but unpredictable nonetheless.

Edited by bgwowk, 12 February 2008 - 11:38 PM.


#8 bgwowk

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Posted 13 February 2008 - 12:14 AM

I am not aware of Asimov's psychohistory inspiring any of it.


Yes Asimov incited the psychohistory movements from Foundation

http://www.psychohistory.org/

I don't question that Asimov started the fictional field of psychohistory. I question whether psyochohistory inspired the idea of retrodiction. The idea of using physics to reverse predict the past in extreme detail is much older than Asimov.

## Everyone needs to understand that ideas seeking to put Universal Resurrection on a scientific foundation are extremely far-fetched, even by transhumanist standards.##

I absolutely dispute QA is far fetched though to answer your challenge I would need ONE reason at a time why you think it seems so for you.
While I loved speculative ideas, I'm only into ones that are practical & possible, and also as cheap and as simple as can be.

Quantum Archeology, in the sense of retrodicting detailed past events or people, is probably the least practical, possible, cheap, or simple idea one can possibly imagine. The main problem is that there is no way to determine the Universal Wave Function (the deterministic complete set of quantum states that compose all of reality). Once branches decohere from each other, information goes elsewhere into the multiverse where you can't interact with it or otherwise detect it anymore. In other words, once a quantum mechanical state is seen to collapse, the details of the original superposition become inaccessible.

There are also other little practical details like the fact that electromagnetic waves, including light waves, necessary to retrodict events on Earth are continuously running away from us at the speed of light. Photons necessary to compute what was happening 100 years ago are now spread over a sphere of 100 light-year radius and getting farther every day.

Then there's the problem of measurement equipment and a computer trying to retrodict a system that includes itself, which would seem to be impossible on its face.

Of all these schemes, I think the most credible one for technological resurrection is computational brute force. However to even resurrect one person, this scheme requires orders and orders of magnitude more computational power than could be built using the matter and energy of the entire visible universe. (Consider that there are more ways to shuffle a deck of cards, nevermind a brain, than there are atoms in the galaxy.) This cannot happen without a cosmological Omega Point that permits future computing to grow without limit. If you look up "far-fetched" in any good dictionary, there will be a fold out picture of the Omega Point. :~

Edited by bgwowk, 13 February 2008 - 01:50 AM.


#9 maestro949

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Posted 13 February 2008 - 12:47 AM

Even if quantum mechanics were not a factor, the classical approach is now known to be unworkable even in principle because of chaos.


The problem here is that it's possible that Chaos doesn't exist. Apparent randomness doesn't equate to true randomness as you can never truly measure any observation with specific precision for setting initial conditions. The notion that an initial condition can be specified is flawed as there will always be a rounding error of these values. We lack this information to answer this basic question "Does chaos exist?" and it's possible that we always will.

The extreme sensitivity of certain classical systems to initial conditions is an established mathematical fact. This means that the macroscopic behavior of certain systems becomes ever more sensitive to ever finer details of initial conditions as time progresses, making prediction of certain aspects of future behavior impossible with any finite knowledge of initial conditions. Chaos is not random, but unpredictable nonetheless.


Unpredictable only due to a lack of information and specificity. Increase both and observable chaos diminishes as we see in quantum systems vs. classical systems. More precision and information = less chaos. Had we the tools to capture the state of a cube of the universe (e.g. our galaxy) at numerous time intervals with extreme precision (subatomic information for which we are presently unaware of at this point), we should be able to predict quite a bit of what would occur within a subset of that cube for some time forward. We would also be able to work backwards for some particular time and reverse engineer prior states within that subset. The amount of time forward you could predict with any accuracy would be dependent on the size of the cube as external events would pollute our state data.

All of this is predicated on technology that doesn't exist and the assumption that more information can be extracted than what classical and quantum physics can currently deliver to us. These are fun thought experiments but nothing more at this point.

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#10 bgwowk

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Posted 13 February 2008 - 01:56 AM

Agreed, maestro. The idea that nothing is ever really lost, and that even past wrongs can be righted by virtue of ever increasing knowledge and resources certainly has deep moral appeal.

Edited by bgwowk, 13 February 2008 - 01:58 AM.


#11 maestro949

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Posted 13 February 2008 - 02:43 AM

Agreed, maestro. The idea that nothing is ever really lost, and that even past wrongs can be righted by virtue of ever increasing knowledge and resources certainly has deep moral appeal.


Indeed. And while resurrecting long dead people may be reserved for hyper-advanced civilizations millions of years in the future, moderately improved cryopreservation techniques might leave enough information embedded in brain tissue such that a neural net could be reverse engineered within a hundred years or so.

#12 bgwowk

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Posted 13 February 2008 - 05:08 AM

Certainly the best possible package of information that could be left behind for future civilizations for reconstruction of personal identity is your brain. It beats the heck out of trying to salvage information from photons scattered through a billion cubic parsecs of the multiverse. :~

Edited by bgwowk, 13 February 2008 - 05:12 AM.


#13 eldras

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Posted 13 February 2008 - 08:23 AM

bgwowk

Great posts. I like 'retordiction' - is it yours? The history of ideas goes back until you find someone you identify with and THAT's the source!

I guess I was very influenced by Asimov.






Quantum Archeology, in the sense of retrodicting detailed past events or people, is probably the least practical, possible, cheap, or simple idea one can possibly imagine.



Nope I imagine it pretty lucidly, I see we are different ones with very different well delevoped skills. This means we are agog that such skills can exist, often.


The main problem is that there is no way to determine the Universal Wave Function (the deterministic complete set of quantum states that compose all of reality).


You may not see a way but to suggest there is no way is drawing a cil-de-sac, which I dispute can ever exist, though as you have anticipated in your caveat, I invoke infinity mathematics. (but I dont necessarily depend on infinities as there are techniques for problem sooving in this area which are quite fun and can be gleaned from '''Edward de Bono''')



Once branches decohere from each other, information goes elsewhere into the multiverse where you can't interact with it or otherwise detect it anymore. In other words, once a quantum mechanical state is seen to collapse, the details of the original superposition become inaccessible.




I think it looks like that on the surface, but under it you are left with disarming fact events have ocured...they have touched your world, and left archaeological traces.

With quite a few of those traces, it shoud be possible with some leg work (like the number crunching you are keen on) to retrodict.

Moreover because of the advancing complexity of the cosmos, there wil be many more events in the present world from which to vector retrodict using graphs, and defining what MUST have occurred by Sherlock Holmes type ellimiation of the impossibles.

What you are left with however improbable MUST be the case.

Because of number crunching capacities not presently available - though anticipated in a couple of decades eg quantum computing, light computing, and especially much more sophistciated represetational maths - we can reduce memory sizes of computers and achieve fantasic speeds.

It isn't necessary to invoke Many World Interpretation & I did it partly to incite the idea of time travel as a solution to some problems and resove the grandfather paradox, but there may come a time when World CAN make contact. Certainly one decent theory says that universes collide and that's what causes new worlds.


If decoherence is taken as a fact then logically it has happened by laws and at the very least a simulation would be 'possible' to recreate it and calculate information.



A point I offer is that information 'can' be created. One does have to forage for it in archaeology.

Frank Tipler suggests the cosmos is finite by way of information and even cites an upward figure for it, while MC Price has said that logically universes may be manufactured since there is a self-evidently a mechanism for them to come into being already, and Steven Hawking that it is finite but unbounded.





There are also other little practical details like



Ho! I dont underestimate the enormity of the task, just I welcome it...in fact I relish it, especially because I have a 'method' that I have developed for tackling mass calculations which I shall launch on the imminst unsuspecting glitterati in due course!



(eg) fact that electromagnetic waves, including light waves, necessary to retrodict events on Earth are continuously running away from us at the speed of light. Photons necessary to compute what was happening 100 years ago are now spread over a sphere of 100 light-year radius and getting farther every day.


One could simply get Banke Moon to order them to turn round.

If he was a difficult to contact, one could note that every event (such as a photon or electromagnetoc wave that had left the earth since your beloved ancestor departed and was cremated in a viking longboat in 400 CE) has left a trace among the variables in todays environment.


You probably daily reflect that at least one molecule in your glass of water has passed through the bowels of Oliver Cromwell (cited Richard Dawkins video lecture on blinkx video), and this is despite the fact that many of those molecules will have decayed to atoms.

There is evidence, there are traces...the world is becomeing MORE compex..there is tons more evidence to resurrect the past than we could possibly need for the smallest event!


Waves or particles it makes no difference and waves are in fashion, and they truely do explain everyting I can think about. I see waves explain the world. You have alreaduy conceeded they are not random but mega compex.

It isn;t true though that they require too much computing power to manipulate. What they require is SOME cmputing power and SOME representation maths.
That's pretty well up to inventors at the maths face to miniturize.

At oreswnt we are doing it long hand.

But when machine intelligence is here THEY will contruct the abstractions.






Then there's the problem of measurement equipment and a computer trying to retrodict a system that includes itself, which would seem to be impossible on its face.



Yes. Measurement is the fulcrum of science.

But it isn't going to done in 3d but in software, and reduction techniques....by pattern-spotting- is the business hereon.

Of all these schemes, I think the most credible one for technological resurrection is computational brute force. However to even resurrect one person, this scheme requires orders and orders of magnitude more computational power than could be built using the matter and energy of the entire visible universe.


Yes but not with quantum computers. a mere 30 qbits yeilds more mower than supercomputers can. True that aint built, and there is the massive efficiency probem to get round, but it looks like they COULD be built and for very small systems, we arrive at infinity maths and hence solve this problem.







(Consider that there are more ways to shuffle a deck of cards, nevermind a brain, than there are atoms in the galaxy.) This cannot happen without a cosmological Omega Point that permits future computing to grow without limit. If you look up "far-fetched" in any good dictionary, there will be a fold out picture of the Omega Point. :~



Most amusing...the idea of using a book. But that proves my point, one system inside a system can have complexity than the macro system itself, it's possible to turn Godel'sincompleteness theorem on its head.

Maths exists. you can pretty well prove what you like with it as long as you dont expect to go into technolgy before AGI gets here.

But it's the QUEST!¬ THE QUEST!

Ho let go of that topsail messmates!

weigh anchor!

The Singularity is Near!

#14 eldras

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Posted 13 February 2008 - 02:20 PM

Hi maestro949 I dunno ther science seems in place to me. Statistics is a very developed area. I mean you can calculate rather than analyse a person's memory I assume, ie working up from dna the propbabilising form a few certain vents...ah maybe not

#15 eldras

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Posted 13 February 2008 - 03:04 PM

I am not aware of Asimov's psychohistory inspiring any of it.

Yes Asimov incited the psychohistory movements from Foundation

http://www.psychohistory.org/

I don't question that Asimov started the fictional field of psychohistory. I question whether psyochohistory inspired the idea of retrodiction. The idea of using physics to reverse predict the past in extreme detail is much older than Asimov.


I didn't type to infer you did, Old Man!
I say he incited it - unfictionally - and attempts are being made at a science of psychohistory because of it.

Psychohistory is more about movements through averaging, and I see retrodiction can be about specifics I see Michael Clive Price is referenced in the wiki article and I should think it's a term in use in quantum science.

The ref above is to the science of psychohistory not it's fiction.

Retrodiction sounds incredibly important.

Almost occult, and I seem to jump that Newton and many early 'scientists' were astologers into the scared geometry which the Christian church wiped when they sacked Egypt and forced conversion.

My knowledge of astrology is inexpert a couple of years nigh school now and then and uable to make a conclusion on it's validity (I was told it would take 15 years study so cut and ran).

But if retrodiction is from astrology then prediction according to celestial bodies is not mad, just a bit simplistic.

We need Newton here to debate it's validity, or rather instruct on it, he would floor me because he has studied it and I have not.

He should be raised again by about 2030 latest! :~


Retrodiction I see is used in quantum optics.

I dunno if you are able to usnderstand that field somewhat, but can archaeological predictions presently be made to any quantum event?

I shall reply to your other points as a bob up and down in the ether if that's OK.

The debate is already too wide for my progress.

#16 eldras

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Posted 13 February 2008 - 03:12 PM

resurrecting long dead people may be reserved for hyper-advanced civilizations millions of years in the future, moderately improved cryopreservation techniques might leave enough information embedded in brain tissue such that a neural net could be reverse engineered within a hundred years or so.



You're having a larf!?

I expect this with AGI in 20 years tops, may be much less. You cant think it will be millions of years???

#17 eldras

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Posted 14 February 2008 - 12:33 PM

Apologies to you for not sparring on quantum archeology, and yes I see it is like retrocition now.

I dont see that anything but AI is important to tackle, because of what AGI

see www.AGI-08.org

is capable of doing, and I already know it can be built and was theoretically acrhitected to safety by July last year in the UK.

I'm off to Oxford to build it and apologies fro not adressing your very competant pint about QA you were kind enough to deal seriously with, and which I dnt have enough knpowldge to reply ojn

Cheers

eldras

#18 eldras

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Posted 14 February 2008 - 04:58 PM

QUANTUM ARCHEOLOGY




Quantum Archeology
- (Quantum Archaeology) also known as quantum resurrection and quantum information retrieval, is is a controversial and emerging idea in modern science about bringing the dead back to life like ancestor simulation and using techniques common in retrodiction.

It is curent in transhumanist and futurist philosophy and is written and debated about (see 'Notes' below) at universities and in books and on forums like Ray Kurzweil's MINDX.

It ruthlessly asserts that there is no qualitative difference between information expressed as a living human being or as a set of data; that as any long dead person is describable & therefore resurrectable, by reconfiguring historical spacetime coordinates using coming science and technolgy they are likely to be reassembled.


One of it's most acute theories describes a possible method for raising the ancient dead using advancing statistical probabilistic sampling quantum calculations like those pioneered by Professor Ray Solomonov, by treating a person as a data set at a defined point of spacetime and seeking to accurately describe that point - then reconstructing them robotically.


It anticipates coming process technologies usually called hypercomputing that include, but are not limited to quantum computing, nanocomputing, and light speed computing and it attempts to look at resurrection issues in terms of information manipulation, in a world that has post-human level intelligence (assumed to occur at more than 10^17 flops (Hans Moravec).

It first surfaced in 2002 in discussions about Tipler's The Physics of Immortality and Steven Wolfram's A New Kind of Science, using the forecasting ideas of new statistics, ideas from fiction and with a focal point called the Omega Point by Pierre Teilihard De Chardin, a Jesuit priest, and Tipler, a professor of mathematics.Supporters include Frank Tipler and opponents Robert Ettinger, and it was discussed at the Pentagon sponsored AI@50 in the USA in 2006.

The idea was inspired by Asimov's Foundation trilogy where Hari Seldon makes aggregate probabilistic predictions using psychohistory across thousands of years.

PSYCHOHISTORY REVERSED

The basis of psychohistory is the idea that, while the actions of a particular individual could not be foreseen, the laws of statistics could be applied to large groups of people and used to predict the general flow of future events.

Quantum Archeology does it backwards, ie uses statistical methods to determine the past at quantum level detail, instead of the future.

It is well written about under specialist headings as information theory, and the resurrections of the dead is one of the most bizarre applications of quantum forecasting and information retrieval using quantum mechanics. Ancestor states are the same for ancestors of groups of sub-atomic particles or for the memories body of a long deceased person, the parameters of the tank dependent only upon what variables or fixed points you can measure from the present, deducing backwards to what must have been, like someone joining up the dots in a child's puzzle.

Quantum Archeology advances that it is possible to reconstruct the exact states of any event (philosophy) of spacetime, enabling the resurrection of any person, when no physical part of them is remains extant. Is is based on the view that whole the cosmos is entirely subject to law and any past points in spacetime are therefore discoverable by enough calculation.

Asimov used the analogy of a gas: in a gas, the motion of a single molecule is very difficult to predict, but the mass action of the gas can be predicted to a high level of accuracy -known in physics as the Kinetic Theory.

Quantum archeology is the opposite of psychohistory and is an attempt at ideating method to prepare for the science of how those predictions are made, including methods like sampling(probability) and is in its infancy.

It assumes the cosmos is a determinist system and it further assumes since human complexity of the cosmos is increasing there will be vastly more useful data available in the present than the past, from which to construct adequate coordinates.

Although the application of quantum archaeological techniques to resurrection was novel, techniques had been researched since the quantum theory exploded onto the world stage from Einstein's monumental work in Relativity.

For a long time it seemed that the cosmos was lawless, but the Many Worlds Interpretation returned physics to determinism, supporting the pathos-filled paragraph by Einstien in a letter to Max Born in September 1944;

“You believe in the God who plays dice, and I in complete law and order in a world which objectively exists, and which I, in a wildly speculative way, am trying to capture. I hope that someone will discover a more realistic way, or rather a more tangible basis than it has been my lot to find. Even the great initial success of the Quantum Theory does not make me believe in the fundamental dice-game, although I am well aware that our younger colleagues interpret this as a consequence of senility. No doubt the day will come when we will see whose instinctive attitude was the correct one.”

We know from Everett's theory that the universe is entirely governed by law, and once the basics of it have been grasped, it is immediately obvious that that must permeate to the smallest thermodynamic levels as well, leaving traceable foootsteps to any point in the past. But Everett's meeting with Neils Bohr in Copenhagen in Spring 1959 had not gone well: it is said Bohr wouldn't allow him to discuss his Many Worlds Theory. One cant know Bohr's objections, and it probably doesn't matter. The theory is an assault on the uniqueness of a man, and that it is probably true makes it less forgivable.

It seems incredible to the layman that a science could advance or retreat acording to politics, but the professional scientist knows only too well one has to fight for a new theory, and that it wont be ignored once exposed. Darwin and Newton had refused to discuss their new science, and what is being called the nmst important theory of the 20th century (BBC 'Parellel Lives') is giving circulation to Everett's work which has led to the advent of quantum computers.


When quantum archeology began to be discussed there was a refusal to take it seriously, partly because it overturned the long-held paradigm that death was irreversible when nothing of the pshyical body was left. When scientists examined it there surprisingly little hostility as it became clear it was correct quite quickly, and also that human death could not be a permanent state in terms of the scientific identity of any possible past human, which had to be describable in terms of data or outside science.

The only issue was then could a point of space time be plotted that gave enough historical coordinates to resurrect when nothing of the person remained to work with?

That issue in turn reduced to could one assemble enough computing power.

Robert Ettinger had wrestled alone with such ideas and continues to break new ground

( Feb 2008 "I suspect--although I don't know--that there is a law of conservation of information, so that in principle no information is ever lost and is in principle capable of recovery").

and found one probable solution by capturing as much of a clinically dead person as possible in a cryonic suspension. He anticipated that future techniques would allow a revival and rejuvenation and that as much information as possible should be stored, beginning with the brain.

Quantum archeology is the natural continuation of that idea, though cryonic suspension is successfully argued to be important for reconstruction.


Frank J. Tipler immediately supported the idea and his letter was published on Ray Kurzweil MINDX, although he saw raising the dead as three dimensional resurrectees as unnecessary because computer simulation will be the same thing.

“You are indeed correct that this is possible because the current universe has limited complexity....the complexity of the visible universe today is bounded above by 10^{123} bits of information. It is indeed correct that the 2nd law of thermodynamics applies to the universe as a whole. In fact, the Second Law is essential in the proof that the laws of physics REQUIRE the computer capacity of the universe to increase without limit.”


Like archeology which is able to reconstruct objects from ancient times using surviving fragments, knowledge about similar objects, and probabilities, quantum archeology assumes future computing power like quantum computers will enable this by back tracing, using laws of cause and effect with emerging mathematical and statistical methods.

There are always more variables in the cosmos than there were is history allowing enough information to be gathered to reconstruct any historical event down to the quantum particle. The universe is becoming increasing complex and any group of variables should plot backwards to a time when there are fewer events.


Everett's Many World's Theory implies that many future worlds will have only a few common ancestors. Moreover, a s time advances, the number of events in the cosmos multiplies allowing checking of back tracing from different variables to common roots. Therefore enough variables will exist at any future time to resurrect any past event in infinite or near infinite worlds.


Quantum Archeology further holds that no event in the cosmos can be non-determined, just complex, and makes no special conditions for human beings or any observers.




The idea was first discussed on line in the kurzweilai forums in 2002, where it was initially regarded as a pseudoscience, but began to be taken seriously and received endorsement from eminent scientists like Frank J. Tipler and written about (see Notes below) as quantum resurrection.


MAJOR CRITICISMS

Another criticism of the theory is that entropy causes irretrievable information loss at death and therefore resurrection would breech the second law of thermodynamics.

Quantum archaeologists retort that entropy does not imply abstract chaos but presently unmeasurable complexity.

Religious objections include the belief human beings operate by different laws to the rest of the universe which was a challenge made to Everett's Many Worlds Theory.


Objections from cyonics founder Professor Robert Ettinger that an objective perspective is not a subjective one - which should also be assigned validity, and may be much more important for survival in human terms - is hard to dispel. He has urged caution in quantum archeology and gives the example of the human mind uploaded into a robot to demonstrate:

in 2007

“...it may eventually be possible to simulate as large a portion of spacetime as desired, to any desired degree of accuracy. But that does not necessarily mean that a simulated person would be alive in our sense, i.e. capable of having subjective experiences.... A simulation is a description of a thing and not the thing itself.”

and in 2008

“In general, the map is not the territory. A description of a thing is not the thing, except in the case that the "thing" is itself an abstraction or description. In particular, a description of a physical object is not that object and lacks some of the properties of the object, as well as including some properties that the object does not have. Further, an automaton that behaves like a person is not necessarily a person, i.e. alive in our sense, capable of subjective experience or feeling. In other words, a person has qualia. A quale is a physical state or phenomenon, not yet understood, but not necessarily duplicable in inorganic matter.



The objection from qualia is a nightmare for many physicists for there is no way to disprove it and history has been a progression of more complex denouements about the structure of humaness. The Egyptians famously threw away the brain which we find laughable today.

General Relativity Professor Roger Penrose has stated that we may not know everything necessary about the brain and has advanced an idea about atomic gravity acting at the synapes to explain the deeper manifestations of human consciousness.

Some philosophers have criticized transhumanism on the grounds that it is an attempt at a religion since both posit immortality, resurrection, description of the universe, and through the Simulation Argument, a designer, but transhumanist's absence of of a subjective valuation system for Man except as an object, is dangerous.

Extropians rebuff this by asserting the theory is intensely humanist and values Man so much it attempts a survival strategy for the assumed irrecoverably dead as well as the living.


Debates occur about the nature of identity such as those discussed in The Prospect of Immortality, and by the philosopher Professor Derek Parfit; the computing capacity needed, and the social and legal difficulties of raising the dead.

Moore's Law and other trends published by Kurzweil indicate when there will be enough processing power to achieve simulations complex enough to map out a world, and it is expected that a 200 Qubit quantum computer may be able to do this (30 Qubits would match todays supercomputer, and D-Wave Systems claims to have built a 16 Qubit system).

It is assumed that singularity technology and Artificial General Intelligence will be required to model enough of the local universe to simulate any human being and many futurists including Vernor Vinge and Ray Kuzweil expect that by 2030 when intelligent technologies are expected on consistently performing trend graphs.

There were very few attempts to build accelerating intelligence and the first conference for Artificial General Intelligence was set up for March 2008; if any of the AGI projects succeed ahead of 2030, it will fulfill the criterea for resurrection by quantum archeology.







See Also



Notes
& sources dealing with the topic by other names

1829-1903 posthumous "What Was Man Created For?: The Philosophy of the Common Task" N.F. Fedorov First mention of resurrection through science (ISBN: 0907855091)

1964 "The Future of Man" Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (Omega Point
theory) ISBN 0-385-51072-1

1987 Renormalisation group theory of spin glasses V S Dotsenko 1987 see ancestor statesJ. Phys. C: Solid State Phys. 20 5473-5478 doi:10.1088/0022-3719/20/33/005

1993 "The Coming Technological Singularity", Verner Vinge. Symposium held at NASA Lewis Research Center (NASA Conference Publication CP-10129)

1995 "The Physics of Immortality" Prof Frank J Tiper. ISBN 0333618645

1998 "Time and history in quantum tunneling" in Superlattices and Microstructures, Volume 23, Number 3, March pp. 823-832(10) A.M.Steinberg

2000 Sub-Poissonian photon statistics of higher harmonics: quantum predictions via classical trajectories Jirí Bajer et al 2000 J. Opt. B: Quantum Semiclass. Opt. 2 L10-L14 doi:10.1088/1464-4266/2/3/102

2000 The Large the Small and The Human Mind Professor Roger Penrose Cambridge University Press

2002 "Psychohistory" (A tool for Historical Prediction) by Christos Z. Konstas ISBN : 960-7928-72-5.

2003 "Are You Living In a Computer Simulation?" Nick Bostrom. Philosophical Quarterly, Vol. 53, No. 211, pp. 243-255.

2004 Quantum Archaeology 'What is actually Teleported?' IBM Journal of Research & Development. Vol. 48 NO. 1 January p64-end re: ancestor states.

2005 "The Singularity Is Near" Ray Kurzweil ISBN 0-670-03384-7.

2005 Quantum Archeology Wed 7 Dec Vlatko Vedral Manchester Theoretical Physics Group SCHUSTER COLLOQUIUM. (see also eg Vlatko Vedral deposited papers Los Alamos http://xxx.lanl.gov/find/ on quantum information recovery (same principle as quantum resurrection).

2006 "Information recovery from black holes" by Vijay Balasubramanian, Donald Marolf, Moshe Rozali in General Relativity and Gravitation pub by Springer Netherlands ISSN 0001-7701 (Print) 1572-9532 (On line) Issue Volume 38, Number 11 / November

2006 "Resurrection of Schrödinger's cat" Jae-Seung Lee and A K Khitrin New J. Phys. 8 144

2006 "A Beginner's Guide to Immortality:" Extraordinary People, Alien Brains, and Quantum Resurrection by Clifford A. Pickover ISBN-13: 9781560259848.

2006 Quantum tool kits could transform archaeology New Scientist July 21st issue 2561

2007 New Scientist article on C.A. Pickover's book (above) Nov 17th.

2007 "The Never-Ending Days of Being Dead: Dispatches from the Front Line of Science" Faber and Faber by Marcus Chown ISBN: 057122055X

2008 "How much of one-way computation is just thermodynamics?" Janet Anders, Damian Markham, Vlatko Vedral, Michal Hajdušek January 21st, arXiv:quant-ph/0702020v1

Psychohistory.org

#19 solbanger

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Posted 14 February 2008 - 05:28 PM

Even if quantum mechanics were not a factor, the classical approach is now known to be unworkable even in principle because of chaos.


The problem here is that it's possible that Chaos doesn't exist. Apparent randomness doesn't equate to true randomness as you can never truly measure any observation with specific precision for setting initial conditions. The notion that an initial condition can be specified is flawed as there will always be a rounding error of these values. We lack this information to answer this basic question "Does chaos exist?" and it's possible that we always will.


Good point. I've always thought of chaos and order as mere opinions, much like good or evil, or even hot and cold. It all depends on your perspective as to what is chaos and what is order. Some people may say that order is the amount of energy put in to resist a zero-point state. The more energy put in, the greater likelihood of order, but the opposite is just as true, the more energy put in the more likelihood of chaos.

#20 eldras

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Posted 17 May 2008 - 10:32 AM

Even if quantum mechanics were not a factor, the classical approach is now known to be unworkable even in principle because of chaos.


The problem here is that it's possible that Chaos doesn't exist. Apparent randomness doesn't equate to true randomness as you can never truly measure any observation with specific precision for setting initial conditions. The notion that an initial condition can be specified is flawed as there will always be a rounding error of these values. We lack this information to answer this basic question "Does chaos exist?" and it's possible that we always will.

The extreme sensitivity of certain classical systems to initial conditions is an established mathematical fact. This means that the macroscopic behavior of certain systems becomes ever more sensitive to ever finer details of initial conditions as time progresses, making prediction of certain aspects of future behavior impossible with any finite knowledge of initial conditions. Chaos is not random, but unpredictable nonetheless.


Agreed, but that still doesn't mean things are unpredictable and controllable ...for example if we catch events early enough.


The fact that systems are extremely comp[lex is just the challenge of describing complexity: all the actions in a complex system follow laws. This immediately means prtediction is much easier. While individual events look difficult to predict, they may not in fact ben, since much of the action in the systm is possible to predict by approximation.

#21 RighteousReason

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Posted 12 September 2008 - 11:01 PM

does anybody know of any good references for ideas relating to scientific resurrection with future technology, or terms/phrases other than "quantum archeology" that this type of idea is known as?

Edited by Savage, 12 September 2008 - 11:01 PM.


#22 eldras

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Posted 01 November 2008 - 03:21 AM

does anybody know of any good references for ideas relating to scientific resurrection with future technology, or terms/phrases other than "quantum archeology" that this type of idea is known as?


Frank J Tipler write the Physics of Immortality which may help.

Colin Pickover has a book out on it which I haven't yet looked at.
Retrodiction (se wiki) is the opposite of prediction

Pyschistory is a term used by Asimov to predict the future, but in the detail quantum archeology does.

Fedorov (cited in this thread) was a 20th century futurist and his work is slowley being translated to english, who mentioned ideas like it so some Russian term may be useful?

⌛⇒ MITOMOUSE has been fully funded!

#23 eldras

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Posted 09 September 2011 - 02:43 PM

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Resurrection Science (Quantum Archeology)
-Raising the dead by science and technology.
UNDER CONSTRUCTION
Howard Carter Born 1874 London
Egyptian Archeologist Howard Carter who found
and preserved Tutankhamen in 1922

ABSTRACT
Quantum Archeology (Archaeology) describes the emerging science of resurrecting dead people using coming technologies.
THE ARGUMENT

Quantum Archeology - (Quantum Archaeology) also known as quantum resurrection quantum information retrieval and resurrection science, is a controversial and emerging idea about process technologies. Statistics probability and number crunching are increasingly specific in assisting archaeological retrodiction, plotting detailed maps of our ancestors, and with enough computing power is likely to be able to describe their memories, and resurrect them with coming technology.
MANIPULATING DATA
Quantum Archeology ruthlessly asserts
'there is no qualitative difference between information expressed as a set of data or expressed as a living human being;
that any long dead person is describable and will therefore be resurrectable by coming technologies;
that by configuring historical space-time coordinates using probability and logic any past event may be reassembled.'

A splinter group affirms that any future event may be calculated as the past and future are subject to the same universal laws of cause and effect. The future is much harder than the past because reconfiguring it may take many factors more computer processing power than any present universe may hold.

One of QA's most acute theories describes a possible method for raising the ancient dead using advancing statistical probabilistic sampling quantum calculations like those pioneered by Solomonoff, treating a person as a data set at a defined point of space-time and seeking to accurately describe that point - then reconstructing them using nano robotics by probability algorithms.

It anticipates hypercomputing which includes, but is not limited to quantum computing, nanocomputing, and light computing and it attempts to look at resurrection issues in terms of data manipulation in a world that may have post-human intelligence (assumed to occur at more than 10^17 flops of computing power (Hans Moravec)).
Statistical methods will improve predictability & are hurtling at dramatic speed, using approximations and pattern matching as well as the 19th century preference for constants (the 'C' in E=MC/\2 is a constant; C is the speed of light agreed by convention to be 299,792,458 metres per second). Boltzman's equation S=klogW gave a formula for finding entropy using constants. Just as in linguistics, statistics, and all mathematics, is founded on agreed memes. Although like language it is a self-referential but infinite system, like language helps Man survive, increase pleasure and avoid pain. Co-founder of A.I. Solomonoff's Algorithmic Probability is an example of a landmark advance in statistics and he was briefly engaged in this debate and confirmed probabilistic assumptions on averaging during conversations and emails before and after AI@50, which was a meeting of 150 experts in Artificial Intelligence at Dartmouth Park in 2006.
"Quantum Archeology" first surfaced in 2002 in discussions about Frank J. Tipler's The Physics of Immortality and Steven Wolfram's A New Kind of Science, using the forecasting ideas of new statistics, ideas from fiction and with a focus called the Omega Point by Pierre Teilihard De Chardin a Jesuit priest, and Tipler, a professor of mathematics. Supporters include Frank Tipler and opponents Robert Ettinger, and it is being debated by an increasing number of scientists and philosophers including Lord Martin Rees, Hans Moravec, David Deutsch, Edward Fredkin, Rich Terrell, Nick Bostrom, Peter S. Jenkins, David Chalmers, Jean Baudrillard, in the general ideas of Simulation Ontology and rational theology/afterlife/resurrection.
Q.A. was inspired by Asimov's Foundation trilogy where Hari Seldon predicts across thousands of years using psychohistory a concept of mathematical sociology using the law of mass action. Psychohistory predicts the future but only aggregately on a mass scale: the larger the number of years the more accurate the predictions. Some futurists on Kurzweilai.net argued this could be done in reverse because there are zillions of measurable variables in the present which all had to converge on the same historical point. This meant it would be easier than ordinary number crunching to reconfigure ANY past event as calculations reduced quickly.
People's memories ,seemingly dread and disintegrated, they argued were no special set of laws but similar to any other set of events with spacetime coordinates.
Such an idea had been thought of independently and separately by Russian philosopher Nikolai Fyodorovich Fyodorov in the 1800's whose works are slowly being translated. Fyodorv tried to plan specific actions for scientific research of the possibility of restoring life and making it infinite. His first project is connected with collecting and synthesizing decayed remains of the dead based on "knowledge and control over all atoms and molecules of the world". (wiki)

Nikolai Fyodorov by Leonid Pasternak

PSYCHOHISTORY REVERSED
"In solving a problem of this sort, the grand thing is to be able to reason backward. That is a very useful accomplishment, and a very easy one, but people do not practise it much. In the everyday affairs of life it is more useful to reason forward, and so the other comes to be neglected. There are fifty who can reason synthetically for one who can reason analytically." Sherlock Holmes Study In Scarlett.
The basis of psychohistory is the idea that, while the actions of a particular individual could not be foreseen, the laws of statistics could be applied to large groups of people and used to predict the general flow of future events.
Quantum Archeology does it backwards, ie uses statistical methods to determine the past at quantum level detail, instead of the future.
It is well written about under specialist headings as information theory, and the resurrections of the dead is one of the most bizarre applications of quantum forecasting and information retrieval using quantum mechanics. Ancestor states are the same for ancestors of groups of sub-atomic particles or for the memories body of a long deceased person, the parameters of the tank dependent only upon what variables or fixed points you can measure from the present, deducing backwards to what must have been, like someone joining up the dots in a child's puzzle.
Quantum Archeology advances that it is possible to reconstruct the exact states of any event whose space-time coordinates can be established, and recreate it with sufficient technical skill, enabling the resurrection of any person, when no physical part of them remains. Is is based on the view that the cosmos is subject to law and any past points in space-time are therefore discoverable by enough calculation.
Asimov used the analogy of a gas. In a gas, the motion of a single molecule is very difficult to predict, but the mass action of the gas can be predicted to a high level of accuracy -known in physics as the Kinetic Theory.
Quantum archeology is the opposite of psychohistory and is an attempt at ideating a method to prepare for the science of how those predictions are made, including methods like sampling (probability) and is in its infancy.
It assumes the cosmos is a determinist system and it further assumes since human complexity of the cosmos is increasing there will be vastly more useful data available in the present than the past, from which to construct adequate coordinates.
Although the application of quantum archaeological techniques to resurrection was novel, techniques had been researched since the quantum theory exploded onto the world stage from Einstein's monumental work in Relativity.
For a long time it seemed that the cosmos was lawless, but the Many Worlds Interpretation returns it to complete cause and effect.
Einstein in a pathos filled letter to Max Born
“You believe in the God who plays dice, and I in complete law and order in a world which objectively exists, and which I, in a wildly speculative way, am trying to capture. I hope that someone will discover a more realistic way, or rather a more tangible basis than it has been my lot to find. Even the great initial success of the Quantum Theory does not make me believe in the fundamental dice-game, although I am well aware that our younger colleagues interpret this as a consequence of senility. No doubt the day will come when we will see whose instinctive attitude was the correct one.” (Sept 1944)
We know from Everett's theory that the universe is entirely governed by laws, even at the very small levels and once they have been grasped, it is immediately obvious that laws must permeate to the smallest thermodynamic levels, leaving traceable footsteps to any point in the past since the existence of any event has only come about by plottable reaction. But Everett's meeting with Neils Bohr in Copenhagen in Spring 1959 went terribly; Bohr wouldn't allow him to discuss his Many Worlds Theory and Everett gave up physics. One cant know Bohr's objections but the theory is an assault on the uniqueness of a man (and on Bohr's work) and that it is probably true makes it less forgivable.
It seems incredible to the layman that a science could advance or retreat according to politics, but the professional scientist knows only too well one has to fight for a new theory, and that it wont be ignored once exposed. Darwin and Newton had refused to discuss their new science after barrages of attacks and even ridicule, and what is being called one of the most important theories of the 20th century (BBC 'Parallel Lives') is giving circulation to Everett's work which has led to the advent of quantum computers.

When quantum archeology began to be discussed there was a refusal to take it seriously, partly because it overturned the long-held paradigm that death was irreversible when nothing of the physical body was left. When scientists examined it there was surprisingly little hostility as it became clear it was correct quite quickly, and also that human death could not be a permanent state in terms of the scientific identity of any possible past human, which had to be describable in terms of data or else it was outside science.
The only issue was then could a point of space time be plotted that gave enough historical coordinates to resurrect someone when nothing of them remained? That reduced to how much computing power would it take to effect a Bostrom Simulation of the local universe.
That issue reduced to could one assemble enough computing power to resurrect the dead?

WHO IS GOING TO DO THIS?

Pioneers at first, probably wealthy visionaries, who will certainly get even wealthier.

It is possible that Resurrection may become a basic human right to be carried out by public private partnerships.

George Edward Stanhope Molyneux Herbert, 5th Earl of Carnarvon at the races, just months before he opened Tutanhamen's tomb
Lord and Lady Carnarvon at the races, just months before he co-opened Tutankhamen's tomb in Egypt.

HOW MUCH COMPUTING POWER IS NEEDED?
Nick Bostrom, Professor at Oxford has dealt with this in his famous paper: The Simulation Argument:
"(for) a realistic simulation of human history...we can use ~10^33 - 10^36 operations as a rough estimate[10]. As we gain more experience with virtual reality, we will get a better grasp of the computational requirements (100 billion humans50 years/human30 million secs/year[10^14, 10^17] operations in each human brain per second [10^33, 10^36] operations."
and also:
"a rough approximation of the computational power of a planetary-mass computer is 10^42 operations per second, and that assumes only already known nanotechnological designs, which are probably far from optimal. A single such a computer could simulate the entire mental history of humankind (call this an ancestor-simulation) by using less than one millionth of its processing power for one second." (ibid)
It is unlikely that no trace of anyone who has ever lived could be deduced by powerful computers likely to be available around 2045 (calculated by Ray Kurzweil using trend predictions like Moore's Law).
People long dead are going to be brought to life, and this can be done by State policy. At first the resurrectees may not be faithful representations of the deceased, but before long they will be ready to be brought back to life with all their memories intact and computers used to instantly reconstruct and rehabilitate them.
To argue this is preposterous, is to argue there are known limits to hypercomputing power which would affect resurrection, which is false.
Here is an example done now from a single image (one variable) - quantum archeology
will use statistical techniques to configure near infinite points of reference for any dead person deduced from variables gatherable in the world of the present:

(Pictures of reconstruction of face of Coppernicus from surviving limited data copyright refused)
Robert Ettinger had wrestled alone with such ideas and continues to break new ground
( Feb 2008 to me: "I suspect--although I don't know--that there is a law of conservation of information, so that in principle no information is ever lost and is in principle capable of recovery").
Ettinger's solution was to capture as much of a clinically dead person as possible in a cryonic suspension.
He anticipated that future techniques would allow a revival and rejuvenation, and that as much information as possible should be stored, beginning with the brain.
The Law of Conservation of Information coined by creationist William Dembski is scorned by evolutionists but may have a seed of a profoundly viable idea for quantum archeology and could involve the plank limit.
To a determinist, the dynamic cosmos is as viable run backwards as forwards.
The principle is immutable causation, and in this sense there can be said to be a Law of Conservation of Information that nothing is ever lost, since running a sufficient simulation backwards must make required events in the cosmos reconfigurable. The lawyer and the historian trade in being able to reconstruct data from the past - data assumed lost - by cross examination, the study of surviving objects and masses of deductive logic. Then judgements are made according to what is most probable.The archaeologist is no less careful.
Quantum Archeologists will do more logic than is perhaps imaginable using coming super systems, because computers are only logic machines running at incredible and accelerating speeds.
Ray Kurzweil and others have discovered formulaic graphs which are astonishingly predictable (The Singularity Is Near 2005).

Quantum archeology is the natural continuation of that system of prediction.
Frank J. Tipler immediately supported the idea and his letter was published on Ray Kurzweil's MINDX, although he saw raising the dead as three dimensional resurrectees as unnecessary because a computer simulation will be the same thing as our reality:
“You are indeed correct that this is possible because the current universe has limited complexity....the complexity of the visible universe today is bounded above by 10^{123} bits of information. It is indeed correct that the 2nd law of thermodynamics applies to the universe as a whole. In fact, the Second Law is essential in the proof that the laws of physics REQUIRE the computer capacity of the universe to increase without limit.”

Like archeology which is able to reconstruct objects from ancient times using surviving fragments, plus knowledge about similar objects, and probabilities, quantum archeology will enable this by back-tracing using laws of cause and effect with emerging mathematical and statistical methods in vastly sophisticated systems.
In an inflating universe there are always more present variables in the cosmos than there were in history, allowing enough information to be gathered to reconstruct any historical event down to the quantum particle.
To retrodict one specific event in history you could use any small set of many billions of possible sets, and it is improbable enough relevant set would not exist in the present to complete and accurate resurrection.

This fact alone is magic to the quantum archeologist! In the year 10 there may be 100 events. But from them evolves by cause and effect a trillion events in the year 100. It follows that there are on average 100,000,000,000 events in year 100 from which to plot back to configure each event in year 10.
Those are good odds, and information is unlikely to be lost because of them.
Only a few of them would probably give all the 10 events exactly by retrodicting by known laws of science.
Quantum archeologists believe that since the universe is becoming increasing complex any group of variables should plot backwards to a time when there are fewer events.
HOW DO YOU RECOVER THE INFORMATION ?
Australopithecus afarensis reconstruction 3.9 million years old.

In 2010 the University of Copenhagen reconstructed the entire nuclear genome of an extinct human being describing him to a high degree (Nature 463, 757-762 (11 February 2010) . This will be increasingly applied to reconstruct other events such as previously living human beings from mere fragmentary data
We will use hypercomuting...coming computers together with mathematics, especially statistics.
There are probably many ways to describe a deceased person to the Nth degree.
Josep Burcet wrote in 2005 about a 'retrieval hypothesis' for recovering enough information about deceased people to effect a resurrection, citing Ervin Laszlo's 'Creative Cosmos' (below) where information is held indefinitely in the Quantum Vacuum until a fundamental change occurs in the cosmos, and the issue is how to extract it.
The idea behind time travel is that information about people exists but is back in time.
Everett's Many Worlds Theory implies that many future worlds will have only a few common ancestors. Moreover, as time advances, the number of events in the cosmos multiplies allowing checking of back tracing from different variables to common roots. Therefore enough variables will exist at any future time to resurrect any past event in infinite or near infinite worlds.

Quantum Archeology further holds that no event in the cosmos can be non-determined, just complex, and makes no special conditions for human beings or any observers.

The idea was first discussed on line in the kurzweilai.net forums in 2002, where it was initially regarded as a pseudoscience, but began to be taken seriously and received endorsement from eminent scientists like Frank J. Tipler and written about (see Notes below) as quantum resurrection.
SIMULATED OR REAL RESURRECTION?
"Any illusion indistinguishable from reality IS reality"
Maxim of Witchraft
Example of a reconstruction of a face using standard techniques
A debate surfaces about the validity of a simulation in a machine, though few in science doubt such simulations will eventually be possible:
"Humans are interested in the past. Archeologists scrutinize fragments of pottery and other broken artefacts, painstakingly piecing them together and attempting to reconstruct the cultures to which such objects belonged. Evolutionary biologists rely on fossil records and gene sequencing technologies to try and retrace the complex paths of natural selection. If the freely-compounding robot intelligences ultimately restructure space into an expanding bubble of cyberspace consuming all in its path, and if the post-biological entities inherit a curiosity for their past from the animals that helped create them, the 10^86 bits available would provide a powerful tool for post-human historians. They would have the computational power to run highly-detailed simulations of past histories- so detailed that the simulated people in those simulated histories think their reality is (real)." Extropia. MINDX
If you produce a recipe or a map of a complete event, like a human being and all their memories at the instant of their (first) death (this paper argues that death is reversible therefore 1st death is what deceased persons have gone through at present), it should be possible with technologies of the future to resurrect them young and fresh in the real world - one we inhabit!
COMMON OBJECTIONS
Q.A. IS IMPOSSIBLE BECAUSE OF ENTROPY
Another criticism of the theory is that too much information is lost for ever on death and destruction of the body.
Quantum archaeologists respond that entropy does not imply abstract chaos but presently unmeasurable complexity.
The number of surviving points in the present from which we can back trace to what existed years ago is much larger than the size we need to calculate events in history, because events multiply with time. For example if you wanted to configure a person's DNA and he left 4 sons that would be 4 starting points to assist your calculation. As time went on he may have 20 great grandchildren and these could help calculations. Each event calculated along one trajectory would not give a definite event, but a certain minimum number would do that. Such conclusions by trajectories into the past involve probability. The tool of probability calculation is well advanced and will get much better as time goes on. It is highly likely we will be able to probablise details thought lost forever, and be able to do it on presently immeasurably small particles.
BRAIN PARTICLES DECAY IRRETRIEVABLY
Yes many do, but you can configure by inference where they must have been at any given time by back-plotting from known data available in the present.
Because there are many more events in the present than the past, many points will back-plot to exactly the same event in history: you dont need all of them to get a definitive reading!

QUANTUM ARCHEOLOGY DEPENDS ON QUANTUM COMPUTERS
No it is a case of how accurate our measurements and deductions can be. Every action leaves a chain of actions from it. One way to think of it is like a snooker table; by taking measurements like the speed and position of the balls in play you can deduce where they must have come from since the last hit. in a bid enough simulation, ie a machine having enough processing power, you would be able to reconstruct the snooker room as well! The speed and position of an electron may be a mystery, but each electron MUST follow the laws of science and therefore its history will be possible to describe with coming capabilities.
YOU NEED SUB-ATOMIC DETAILS OF DISPERSED MEMORY
No. The brain is made of molecules and atoms, and sub atomic particles may be irrelevant in reconstruction.
However if they are needed, these too will be calculable by retrodiction, following the same principle...that there are many loci points in the present from which to calculate backwards and reconstruct the deceased.

RELIGIOUS OBJECTIONS
Religious objections include the belief human beings operate by different laws to the rest of the universe which was a challenge made to Everett's Theory. This is rebuffed by Many Worlds Theory states people are exactly the same as anything else in space-time.
The common objection that it is ungodly or 'playing with nature' has been answered in many debates. QA supporters argue that raising the dead does not infringe on God, as if God exists he is capable of carrying out resurrection through the agency of Man, indeed much of his work has historically been done that way.
Its unfortunate Quantum Archeology was voted off wikipedia a number of times but it is likely to return as it becomes notable.

IT HASN'T BEEN DONE YET
Objections from cryonics founder Professor Robert Ettinger that a theoretically objective perspective may not encompass a subjective one - which should also be assigned validity, and may be much more important for survival in human terms - is hard to dispel. He has urged caution in quantum archeology and gives the example of the human mind uploaded into a robot to demonstrate:
“...it may eventually be possible to simulate as large a portion of spacetime as desired, to any desired degree of accuracy. But that does not necessarily mean that a simulated person would be alive in our sense, i.e. capable of having subjective experiences.... A simulation is a description of a thing and not the thing itself.”
and again
“In general, the map is not the territory. A description of a thing is not the thing, except in the case that the "thing" is itself an abstraction or description. In particular, a description of a physical object is not that object and lacks some of the properties of the object, as well as including some properties that the object does not have. Further, an automaton that behaves like a person is not necessarily a person, i.e. alive in our sense, capable of subjective experience or feeling. In other words, a person has qualia. A quale is a physical state or phenomenon, not yet understood, but not necessarily duplicable in inorganic matter."- (Robert Ettinger to me 2007, 2008).
The objection from qualia is a nightmare for many physicists as there is no way to disprove it and history has been a progression of more complex denouements about the specialness of Man. The Egyptians famously threw away the brain during the preservation rituals which we find laughable today.
General Relativity Professor Roger Penrose has stated that we may not know everything necessary about the brain and has advanced an idea about atomic gravity acting at the synapses to explain the deeper manifestations of human consciousness. Should this theory be correct it will reduce our workings by factors of size and not disprove our underlying method, that by applying the laws of science to probability and observation we can reconstruct things from the past that are indistinguishable from what they were.
Some philosophers have criticized transhumanism on the grounds that it is an attempt at a religion since both posit immortality, resurrection, description of the universe, and through the Simulation Argument, a designer, but transhumanist's absence of of a subjective valuation system for Man except as an object, is dangerous.
Extropians rebuff this by asserting the theory is intensely humanist and values Man so much it attempts a survival strategy for the assumed dead as well as for the living.
Another objection from quantum mechanics is that retrodiction traces myriad histories, not just one common past, and therefore it would be impossible to calculate the exact person as required. This is refuted on the grounds that Many Worlds Theory has returned cosmology to determinism, and the sheer scale of the calculation involved baffles people into believing it is not possible.
We may well describe many worlds, but there are likely to be ways of calculating which exact world we wish to resurrect artefacts....living or non-living....from.
Anything that has existed or will exist has definite pathways, however many parallel worlds split, and therefore are always calculable. The aim is not to capture the actual person from the past, but only to calculate their space-time or other coordinates to the Nth degree, and then to reconstruct them in the present.
WHAT WILL BE RESURRECTED?
It is even now possible to resurrect a clone of some mammals including Neanderthal Man, so some form of immortality is possible with present technology; the real challenge is retrieving everyone's memories, for memories constitute the man.
How far this can be taken is dependent on our measuring and construction expertise, though most agree this is likely to leap with the advent of hypercomputers, when machines begin designing and inventing for themselves. Invention is close to the heart of Man's genius, but it cannot be a mystical process and so will be achieved mechanically.
The objection assumes some special property of a human being not accessible by the laws of science.
Techniques are likely to be discovered that can manipulate the extremely small as well as the very large, but it is thought unlikely that faithful replication beyond sub-atomic levels would be necessary to resurrect people and their memories, even if superstrings are not the smallest possible state, which they may well not be.
Debates occur about the nature of identity such as those discussed in chapter 8 of The Prospect of Immortality (free online), and by Oxford philosopher Professor Derek Parfit. Other issues are the computing capacity needed, and the social and legal difficulties of raising the dead.
Moore's Law and other trends popularized and discovered by Kurzweil indicate when there will be enough processing power to achieve simulations complex enough to map out a world, and it is expected that a 200 Qubit quantum computer may be able to do this.
It is assumed that singularity technology and Artificial General Intelligence will be required to model enough of the local universe to simulate any human being and many futuristsVernor Vinge and Ray Kuzweil expect it by 2030 when intelligent technologies are expected on consistently performing trend graphs.
There were very few attempts to build accelerating intelligence and the first conference for Artificial General Intelligence was set up for March 2008; if any of the AGI projects succeed ahead of 2030, it will fulfil the criteria for resurrection by quantum archeology.
RESURRECTION - A BASIC HUMAN RIGHT
Resurrection will become a basic civil and human right, as it becomes clear that it is indeed possible to raise the ancient dead with coming technology. We have outlined probable scientific methods by which resurrection may happen, and invited people to contest the validity of our assertions elsewhere in this work.
MAN HAS A SOUL THAT CANT BE INTERFERED WITH BY SCIENCE
QA is a scientific idea and has nothing to do with religion.
THERE ARE MANY PAST HISTORIES YOU WONT FIND THE CORRECT ONE
This objection is from The Many Worlds Interpretation of quantum mechanics, that states the world is splitting into more at each event.
It is answered from statistical dynamics within Many Worlds maths.
All past and all future possible histories are correct in that they do tend to exist.
However any defined history will have effect markers in the present able to converge to tributary specificity beyond out present science to configure, and conformable as the correct histories by cross-calculation proofs as done in simultaneous equations, from other markers and marker effects.
The required past, calculated within a set of known present markers, is not all the past but a narrowing field of the past as you begin to eliminate irrelevant histories by impossibilities, calculating probabilities that will tend to 100%.
"...when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth" - Sherlock Holmes. The Sign of Four
RESURRECTION OF QUANTUM INFORMATION IS AGAINST THE LAW OF ENTROPY
While the Law of Entropy looks sound, it does not state that the total energy in a system alters.
Information is just certain arrangements of data, expressed as particles of energies.
Data is constantly arranging and rearranging, but the beauty of it is that it moves according to the laws of science and not in unpredictable ways.
Every thought you have ever had is the inevitable resultant of things moving according to scientific laws, and this was also true for your ancestors.
It is therefore not possible that an event in history could be lost give sufficient computing power. More, the amount of computing power needed for such a calculation estimated now
While there may be some parts of the past that are hard to trace direct paths to, there will so many starting points available that many lines of calculation will aggregate to the required points.
THERE ISN'T ROOM TO BRING BACK THE DEAD
We will make and find new places to live in the cosmos when we have enough science to resurrect the dead. Such a time may be closer than many think if one considers computer ability trends.
CONTINUITY STOPS SO THE RESURRECTEES ARE NOT THE SAME PEOPLE
Despite time passing, so long as you accurately restore the deceased to their last state, repairing them to full health and youth, the fact that time has passed does not mean they are entirely different people. The key to men is their memories. There is great hope to assume we will be able to restore all memories, including some we thought were lost as we aged.
PENROSE HAMMEROFF OBJECTION

This argument states that the human self operates at quantum and indeterministic levels, and could never be recaptured once dead.
Even if the quantum mind is proven- at the moment it is conjecture and may even be against Ockham's Razor-it must still operate by laws.
Sooner or later those laws will be discovered and spacetime coordinates from the entire deceased person reconfigured.

CHAOS THEORY MAKES QUANTUM ARCHEOLOGY IMPOSSIBLE
The advent of chaos theory that sprang from the work of Alan Turing showed that the butterfly effect was present in systems. Very small changes, often from the sub systems effected the major systems. This merely means that calculations must be more specific and more maths and computing than we have, as well as new sciences, are certain to come.
WHO WILL JUDGE THE RESURRECTEES FOR THEIR PAST CRIMES?
Law is specific expert area which is likely to evolve with our technology; retrospective law is not usually allowed by most legal systems.
CAN FUTURE PEOPLES READ MY THOUGHTS NOW?
Future people are likely to have massive facilities of mind and body, probably unimaginable today, if many of the philosophical propositions of A.I. are correct eg 'intelligence has no upper limit.' With such powers our present thoughts may have little interest for them.
IF WE CAN RAISE THE PAST CAN WE PREDICT THE FUTURE?
Yes, it's the same method. We already make predictions and live by them. Predictions in the future will be massively more accurate. A philosophical difficulty is the place of Man and the seeming refutation of free will: that may be answered with 'the compatibility argument' in philosophy, which holds that free will & determinism are not in conflict. Work will need to be done about how to determine which timeline is required, which is at present thought impossible as science, though not as philosophy.
ARE THERE ANY LIMITS TO PREDICTION/RETRODICTION?
Yes. The limits are the capacity of the machine doing the calculations. If 'M Theory' is correct, then the universe may be too vast for the smartest machine ever to predict it.
However it may still be able to predict enough of it to be useful. It is also likely that coming machines will easily be able to retrodict almost all dead people and their memories, because the machines of the future are going to be very intelligent & have huge capacities.
WHY DOESN'T RESURRECTION HAPPEN ANYWHERE ELSE IN NATURE
This objection is the old one that such events are against nature. however resurrection is a daily event in nature and especially in the human body, where cells are copied as they die and are replaced by new and identical ones. you are already a copy of the 'self' that existed years ago, many times over!
DOES QUANTUM ARCHEOLOGY INVALIDATE CRYONICS?
No. The more data about someone we store the easier it will be to resurrect them. If you can get a cryonic suspension it is wiser to get that; quantum resurrection has not been achieved yet because our computers are not sophisticated enough, and there may be some unforeseeable reason why it would not work.
QUANTUM ARCHEOLOGY IS COUNTER-INTUITIVE
It is also against surface observation! We observe people dying and they have never come back.
Because something is counter intuitive cannot mean it is wrong, and there are many examples were logic is accepted over intuition and observation, such as the earth goes round the sun even though we see the sun rising. Until the first man went above the earth, there was no proof that the earth was round from direct observation. This proof is called empirical proof, because things can be seen. However there is also logical proof, which has to be accepted as true in science when the proposition are true, and the rules are true and have been applied correctly.
Quantum Archeology is based on many propositions (which are true) and many rules (which are true); even though the conclusion seems impossible and in conflict with our instinct, we MUST accept it as true when both the propositions are true and the rules of logic have been correctly applied. Einstein discusses "true" in his 1916 work on Relativity is the most impactful scientist for 300 years redifining the Universe as Ptolomy and Copernicus had.
Q.A is consistent with logic and good science.
WHY WASN'T QUANTUM ARCHEOLOGY DISCOVERED BEFORE
Ideas about resurrection are ancient, but until 1859 when Charles Darwin published On The Origin of Species By Means Of Natural Selection, and when Alan Turing designed the Automatic Computing Engine in 1946, it was assumed that 'God would resurrect the dead because Man would always find it too complicated'. People are less certain where the limits of science are.
RESURRECTING THE DEAD IS TOO COMPLICATED TO BE POSSIBLE
It was once too complicated to sequence the human genome or go to the moon. What we can analyse and describe is growing bigger every year, every month. Every week more data can be manipulated more efficiently. It is likely that quantum space-time events will be manipulated too and complete enough descriptions of any historic person at the very instant of their death to be calculable.
WHEN YOU'RE DEAD YOU'RE DEAD
Quantum Archeology, like cryonics , demands a new definition of death.
There is no scientific reason why the ancient dead - with all their memories intact, rejuvenated to full health - should not be resurrected and continue living in a vast cosmos.
John Ellis
Oxford University Computer Laboratory
1st readable draft
21st April 2008

See Also
Information Theory
Psychohistory
Statistics
Prediction
Quantum Theory
Many Worlds Theory
Technological Singularity
Forecasting


Notes
& sources
1829-1903 posthumous "What Was Man Created For?: The Philosophy of the Common Task" N.F. Fedorov First mention of resurrection through science (ISBN: 0907855091)
1964 "The Future of Man" Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (Omega Point
theory) ISBN 0-385-51072-1
1977 Foundations of Mathematical Logic Haskel .B Curry ISBN 0 486 63462 0
1987 Renormalisation group theory of spin glasses V S Dotsenko 1987 see ancestor statesJ. Phys. C: Solid State Phys. 20 5473-5478 doi:10.1088/0022-3719/20/33/005
1993 "The Coming Technological Singularity", Verner Vinge. Symposium held at NASA Lewis Research Center (NASA Conference Publication CP-10129)
1995 "The Physics of Immortality" Prof Frank J Tiper. ISBN 0333618645
1996 The Creative Cosmos, Ervin Laszlo, Floris Books ISBN: 0863151728
1998 "Time and history in quantum tunneling" in Superlattices and Microstructures, Volume 23, Number 3, March pp. 823-832(10) A.M.Steinberg
2000 Sub-Poissonian photon statistics of higher harmonics: quantum predictions via classical trajectories Jirí Bajer et al 2000 J. Opt. B: Quantum Semiclass. Opt. 2 L10-L14 doi:10.1088/1464-4266/2/3/102
2000 The Large the Small and The Human Mind Professor Roger Penrose Cambridge University Press
2000 Forever For All R Michael Perry ISBN-10: 1581127243 # ISBN-13: 9781581127249 Universal-Publishers
2002 N. A. Berdyaev The Religion of Resusciative Resurrection "The Philosophy of the Common Task" "Philosophiya obschego dela" of N. F. Fedorov, translated by Fr. S. Janos 2002. ISBN 978-0823680740
2002 "Psychohistory" (A tool for Historical Prediction) by Christos Z. Konstas ISBN : 960-7928-72-5.
2003 "Are You Living In a Computer Simulation?" Nick Bostrom. Philosophical Quarterly, Vol. 53, No. 211, pp. 243-255.
2004 Quantum Archaeology 'What is actually Teleported?' IBM Journal of Research & Development. Vol. 48 NO. 1 January p64-end re: ancestor states.
2005 "The Singularity Is Near" Ray Kurzweil ISBN 0-670-03384-7.
2005 Quantum Archeology Wed 7 Dec Vlatko Vedral Manchester Theoretical Physics Group SCHUSTER COLLOQUIUM. (see also eg Vlatko Vedral deposited papers Los Alamoshttp://xxx.lanl.gov/find/ on quantum information recovery (same principle as quantum resurrection).
2006 "Information recovery from black holes" by Vijay Balasubramanian, Donald Marolf, Moshe Rozali in General Relativity and Gravitation pub by Springer Netherlands ISSN 0001-7701 (Print) 1572-9532 (On line) Issue Volume 38, Number 11 / November
2006 "Resurrection of Schrödinger's cat" Jae-Seung Lee and A K Khitrin New J. Phys. 8 144
2006 "A Beginner's Guide to Immortality:" Extraordinary People, Alien Brains, and QuantumResurrection by Clifford A. Pickover ISBN-13: 9781560259848.
2006 Quantum tool kits could transform archaeology New Scientist July 21st issue 2561
2007 New Scientist article on C.A. Pickover's book (above) Nov 17th.
2007 Edward Anderson. Records Theory
2007 "The Never-Ending Days of Being Dead: Dispatches from the Front Line of Science" Faber and Faber by Marcus Chown ISBN: 057122055X
2008 "How much of one-way computation is just thermodynamics?" Janet Anders, Damian Markham, Vlatko Vedral, Michal Hajdušek January 21st, arXiv:quant-ph/0702020v1
2010 ' Theological Implications of the Simulation Argument' Ars Disputandi Volume 10 1566-5399
2010 "Algorithmic Probability and Heuristic Programming and AGI" Ray Solomonoff
Psychohistory.org
2010 "Closed timelike curves via post-selection: theory and experimental demonstration": Seth Lloyd, Lorenzo Maccone, Raul Garcia-Patron, Vittorio Giovannetti, Yutaka Shikano, Stefano Pirandola, Lee A. Rozema, Ardavan Darabi, Yasaman Soudagar, Lynden K. Shalm, Aephraim M. Steinberg: arxiv.org/abs/1005.2219


#24 Alex Libman

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Posted 12 September 2011 - 11:28 AM

I've joked about this in the past, but it's really the most mind-blowing game-changing discovery the human civilization is likely to ever deal with! I would also say that IMHO this is more likely to be attainable than faster-than-light travel and time travel (especially to alter past). The idea of privacy will be a joke, as every atom of your body and mind at any nanosecond of its existence would be accessible to infinite future archaeologists who can see past the illusion of time!

Edited by Alex Libman, 12 September 2011 - 11:29 AM.


#25 eldras

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 06:03 AM

I still haven't read Mike's book.

Bob Ettinger & John MacCarthy have 'died' recently one in one out I think.

Interesting to see which one resurrects first.

I'm still working on the article above sporadically while trying to run an A.I. in UK):

https://sites.google...tumarchaeology/

#26 Julia36

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Posted 30 August 2012 - 08:41 AM

Thanks for helpful comments I've updated the article and it is here for your pleasure!
Due to complications logging in my user name has changed..I'd prefer open forum debate on this rather than emails to em as I'm a partial recluse.impacting issue for cryonics is ath we will have to converge our technologies in Quantum Archaeology and Recondtruction from cryonic suspension to succeed in eiather (i signed up insurance for cryonics in aprox 1990)

Quantum Archaeology 1/8

Email



The science and engineering of resurrecting the dead.

Dedication - for Frank Jennings Tipler

"wer dachte mehr"


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"All great truths begin as blasphemies."

George Bernard Shaw



This public version in preparation (50,000+ words).

Assembled from better minds on Kurzweilai.net, and longecity.org Images are holding places only.
(c~) text copyrights waived. (As this essay changes it may be safest to download and print a copy of the bit you're interested in as it may not be here tomorrow!). A version above may be an easier place to start.




ABSTRACT



Quantum Archaeology - (QA) is a breaking idea of resurrection in transhumanism. It attempts a science of bringing the long dead & their memories back to life using coming process technologies, mathematics and statistics, where no trace of them remains in the present. It was thrown off wikipedia at the first attempt as original research and not notable, and that version can be seen here.


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Quantum Computers which IBM expects to be ready after 2022 and do near infinite calculations in a few seconds., may be passed by new maths as super recursive algorithms.






Quantum archaeology was inspired by Russian born Asimov's psychohistory - in turn inspired by Einstein's determinist denouement of Brownian motion, and was also an idea of the 19th century Russian cosmist movement. It was awoken after the birth of the world wide web by Frank Tipler's responding to cryonics, and QA was forged in discussions on internet forums.




It is a drafted in classical physics and could easily be called retrodiction for it back-calculates events that must have been from those known in the present. Information loss may be got round by the enormous timelines we can trace back. If the physical universe cant be reversed, at least archaeology can calculate probabilisticaly what must have been down to the quantum level which is the smallest that the human brain has been theorized to operate at (quantum tubules).
Whether it is relevantly so minute or not doesn't affect the idea, which assumes only that the world operates by laws, they can be stated, and we can calculate backwards to establish all events. This comes easily to futurists who are used to prediction which is statistical inference in calculating what happens next.



QA assumes that the universe is governed by laws and that will know enough of them to calculate our past accurately.

Presently conceived insimple axiomatic logic QA includes a detailed, expanding four dimensional graph of history called the Quantum Archaeology Grid, and anticipates hypercomputation, synthesis of data banks and clever, vastly superior ways of manipulating numbers.

Quantum means the minimum amount of an entity. So quantum archaeology is the archaeology (recovery and analysis of human data) of the smallest amounts of entities.

QA posits recovery and reconstruction of sufficient data to calculate the details of anyone dead - including their memories - preparing a map of them for later technologies, like micro robots, to build to order.

Quantum robots which Paul Benioff at Argonee National Laboratory conceived in 1981 (along with quantum computers, which David Deutsche


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at Oxford immediately recognised as a breakthrough and structured), and which have not yet been built, are an interesting subset of quantum machines,



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and may be able to rebuild people once lost to history from minutely accurate grids. Coming technologies like 3D printing seem to have no scale limits and may eventually be used routinely at quantum levels, nor be restricted to three dimensions, as non-living events then people are resurrected to full functionality. These resurrectees will be indistinguishable from the real thing underEttinger's maxims of identity. Once the quantum archaeological grid is drawn, any number of a specific dead person could be manufactured, a complete simulation of their consciousness from conception to death written down or run as a computer program, and all would be authentic, despite the ego screaming at such possibilities. The processing power to achieve that is close, and the mathematics already in place.


This paper looks at the objections and the implications of quantum archaeology. I will also attempt to argue that the greatest theme in Life is a love that survives death and that this is of itself a will to recursive civilisation It is impossible to cite the necessary facts and references from which comes this insufficient collation, that must come in a longer version of graphs, tables, techniques, data bases and I have mentioned but a few of their large numbers as my occupation as once OK poet has allowed.







INTRODUCTION


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We must attack death on every front. We must plan against it for the future, dismember it in the present, and revoke it in the past.



In our hands lie the great tools of science and technology. Behind them the tested systems of causality (and it's sub-set,probability) by which all classical laws of science operate.Add to these the vast facts we are collecting in numerous data bases, plus the near occult genius of modern statistics and computing and we may soon make specific descriptions of even the tiniest event that was assumed long buried in history.




Quantum archaeology has to be a painstaking, laborious, meticulous craft, proceeding by incrementals and piecing together from a mass of apparently chaotic information, what is, what couldn't be, and what certainly must have been.





It must apply the techniques set down by Malthus for data handling, who introduced a finery of detail that cataloguing and analysis have sought to copy - including Darwin, who credited him in his introduction in Origin:

"This is the doctrine of Malthus, applied to the whole animal and vegetable kingdoms."

We must apply the doctrine of Malthus to the whole of human history to the quantum level, drawing a complete minute archaeological record, listing known data and configuring missing data using causal lines & probability, There is much work: it will be years before it is achieved, but the stakes are high and we can begin now.If we succeed, the dead will rise, a new age will dawn - The Age of Resurrected Man - and this will affect our psyches will be utterly changed like the coming technologies that will underpin it.

This is a serious attempt to abolish the history of death. Undying we are at last intrinsically valuable. We can and must master Nature, and halt & reverse it's cruelty and time limits like blind heuristic evolution. Peace's Paradise Engineering provides a philosophical direction here, and Artificial General Intelligence or Intelligence Amplification foreseen by Verner Vinge in his address to address to NASA will certainly enable them.
These two great goals..resurrection and and re-engineering the sentient world are the pillars of transhumanism.

Few would dare daydream this before the advent of machine calculators. These are anticipated to become vast enough to configure the positions of every molecule in the ocean. Could they calculate where each has come from back to the dawn of time?

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The Ocean has 4.4 X 10^46 molecules.(Click to enlarge). Random chaos or intricate and retraceable complexity?

Technology is arriving faster today than yesterday, and faster tomorrow that we grasp today. No-one is out of the game. Nobody is beyond repair, no-one is dead. Because no-one is finally dead. The value shifts QA demands from newbies is daunting. Even hardened thinkers find it challenging to ditch long held beliefs in the face of this new wind. And this is just the start of what mathematics as machinery is going to do.




The birth cry of a new meme like the discovery of gravity, evolution or relativity, is often derided as lunacy. Then as profoundly wrong and wicked. But nothing is more powerful than an idea whose time has come, and this unusual spark, catching the imagination of thinkers from the most curious of extropian disciplines, has already lit fires of interest in groups not usually associated with coming technology.



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Copying the dying to new bodies was conceived by Hans Moravec.



If quantum archaeology works, civilization will become recursive. People from the past will interact with people from the present. There are other implications of resurrecting the dead in a high-tech society but this paper's object is to argue that a resurrection engineering science is feasible.





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The world's first digital, programmable computer, Colossus,was built by the UK Post Office 1943.


The concept has already been proved with classical archaeology and remarkable facial reconstructions are demonstrably accurate. Polish police forensics department has reconstructed the face of Copernicus (see page 5). None of it remained, and it was deduced from fragments in the present - as was Tutankhamen (above) and the much older Georgian couple (below). These probability reconstructions mixing science and art are good enough for relatives to recognize, so a principle exists even using presently crude techniques that its possible to sketch some of the past with amazing accuracy. Quantum archaeology conjectures the brain must also be reconstructable by using environment records, causalities and probabilities in hypercomputers, and there will be no recovery difference between things inside or outside a skull, or things about which we have no surviving fragments or records and those which have a lot.

This is no way invalidates cryonics which is the best way we have of preserving data of the dead for future reconstruction, and is complimentary to it.

Since the environment is an interactive interrelated system, many extant variables can be used to construct anything that has existed by cross-referencing within the laws of physics and back tracking what must have been. The only requirement seems to be enough computing power.

The sizes of a human being that are unique are in nanometres, with the lower rages of not more than the ions which determine neural cavity receptors. Classical physics can deal with most of it. Quantum physics is still unravelling, but at least one interpretation is deterministic, and probability is able to make predictions (and implicitly retrodictions) for the others.



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All events are limited by and linked by laws.


Einstein controversially refused to accept Brownian motion was random and proved it was causal in the Annus Mirabilis papers.. An unabashed determinist, He was sure everything possible in science had to exist by cause and effect - , however complex it seemed to be because of it's scale, and in the face of highly successful competing theories. Few doubt he is the greatest scientist the world has ever seen, and the world of the very small is being studied for understandable laws and measurements which it does not yet have.


The size and scale of necessary calculations made resurrection unthinkable but emerging computers and maths see them as small problems. Important techniques like super-recursive algorithms (SRAs) are enabling vast data manipulations that may be better than even quantum computers. The data of a person who died long ago doesn't have to exist any more - there just has to be a maths to recreate it probabilistically (which this essay argues is necessarily a branch of causation), and the beginnings of that maths is already here.

Cosmologists use maths to reach back in time and reconstruct events within the first 10 -35th (0.00000000000000000000000000000000001) of a second after the big bang. Mapping a human being a few thousand years ago seems a much easier task.

Cosmologists have tons of planets, suns and galaxies to work back from. But quantum archaeologists have a growing number of data bases like the archaeological record, and the biological record. Coupled with things like DNA records, epigenome records, geology, history and known laws of science, is it too difficult to imagine a reconstruction - so accurate that a deceased person's mind could be precisely plotted and rebuilt - in the future? How far could we go right now? Would this indeed be the deceased person- and is a copy the same as the original? How would they be rehabilitated, where would they live, and what would be their rights?

Quantum archaeology postulates resurrection, attempts to answer these questions in terms of science, and is an attempt at a method.

We can find or calculate causal and probabilistic pathways to what must have been in the minds of deceased people at the moment of their deaths if we can reconstruct a detailed enough simulation of the past. The physical makeup of a person should be expressible as dynamic data sets, and these could be calculated for any time in the past. Quantum archaeology side-steps the issue of free will, where it arises in identity, by adopting compatibilism - both are true, but different perspectives.

Drawing space-time coordinates by statistical techniques, it may be easier to calculate backwards as there are more events in the present than past, and cross-checking from available event pathways can give accurate historical maps in great detail for required timelines. Digital probabilistic physics suggests the cosmos is a probabilistic system. If so other laws may be relevant in addition to pure causality, but where there are laws there is predictability.

Our particular universe, thought in M-theory to be one of an infinite number, is an interrelated system, not just connected by gravity, but by all the events and fields that exist. What happens in the north affects what happens in the south, and some particles affect each other instantly with almost unbelievable symmetry across incredible distances, although we dont understand how they are causally connected yet.

Time is not the issue in physics like the normal world. In physics time is the relationship between events, and movement and distances are ways of describing the forces of energy affecting them. Since Einstein showed time is relative, it may be possible for events in the past to influence events in the future interactively.. It doesn't matter when a person died, what matters is whether we have enough processing power or maths to do the calculations accurately describing them for resurrection. These calculations are too big for us at present, but may eventually be done probabilistically if not causally.


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(Click to activate) Cause and Effect underpin science

In the coming computers, massive calculations will be easier and we can enter the mathematics as inflatable symbolism, like seeds contain inflatables for big trees. We even have a maths for infinities! Every bit of a person's life - including their most private thoughts - are going to be drawn by quantum archaeologists, at first for genus or species but then specific individuals. Once we have a map of a person we will resurrect them robotically in groups when our technology is ready. Scientists believe that may be about 2045.

It doesn't matter if quantum archaeology takes a hundred billion years.... the dead are in no hurry! The impact on the psyche may be enormous as people realize death is not a terminal. We can already say what computing power will be needed to construct accurate maps of the past because we already have an idea about how to do it and maps with hundreds of billions of moving variables already exist (New World Simulation 2011).

Predicting how computing is advancing, and what we need, we guess that in 20-40 years we'll be able to map anything that has ever lived on earth down to their atoms.

This paper attempts to show that nothing of a long dead person need still remain and yet a complete map of their brain and body can be drawn by retrodiction from present events. Then it will attempt to show that coming quantum robots will physically resurrect them.



As we gain mastery over the quantum world, we can learn to create or gather quantum information. Groups of thinkers are examining the line of logic on this, testing what is known to be possible in science against what is expected to be possible as our machines improve.



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The very small obey laws so we can calculate where things were.


Quantum archaeology, a useful addition to experimental archaeology, involves probabilities to reassemble the past by cause and effect, by measurement and calculation, by time grids and algorithmic probability, and by cross-referencing across vast reconstruction systems, including at the planck scale of the quantum world.

It makes makes no assumption that we'll be able to mine information from from the past light cone of the universe, although it will attempt that as well, but it is about using the information in the present to figure out what detailed events in the past must have been

It is the deliberate reconstruction of data from the past, to recreate persons, places, things and relationships using probabilities and classical cause and effect to retrodict and rebuild people back to life: at first as detailed mapping, and then reassembling atoms.

There are many starting points. A person's memory is their raw DNA neuron growth, altered by the events that happen to them which cause memory, both epigenetically and by RNA changes. Memories are built by physically determined lawful reactions to previous events, and we will attempt to reconstruct everyone who has ever lived to full youthful health: that man who lived near you; that boy who was killed in an accident; that old woman you once knew; all the soldiers killed; all the babies who died at birth; it seems only a matter of enough computing power for the present is littered with effects of earlier causes and these can surely be traced back.

Computing power increases by predictable amounts annually and we should have enough by 2030 to achieve first results and be operational by 2045.


Many methods of classical archaeology are useful. Relative dating, record assembly and keeping, preservation protocols, intellectual property, stewardship and meticulous rigour are necessary. What is different is the accelerating science of computation which makes things possible that were too vast to be thinkable before. A dead person is not of infinite complexity. A person is 3 billion letters of DNA effected by epigenetic, RNA, and brain changes....plus anything else we discover, multiplied by the events and time of history. To calculate those possibilities by hand and then eliminate the impossible ones would take trillions of man-years. The coming computers are predicted to be able do it in seconds, and be error free.

For however complicated men's lives were, all have been determined within the laws of science. With enough computing power it should be possible to trace every event - and every thought!

It isn't the aim of this paper to deal in any detail with economic, social nor political issues. Emerging technology is likely to cope because the scale of improvement that is coming is thought to be massive, and the viability of quantum archaeology and techniques of how resurrection may be done is the paper's central theme.
I have also tried to avoid theological debates, whose enormous portion deals with resurrection of the dead, because the philosophies of theology and science have been in opposition since Darwin in contemporary society as was evidenced by the (online) Dawkins v Williams Oxford debate.

I have used hypertext where necessary but generally removed links where they are easily highlighted to a search engine. If this paper is book-published, references will be inserted by a professional indexer.

I am hopeful that anybody objectively reviewing these ideas will conclude that quantum archaeology needs to be explored, and more rigorously than I am able to do.

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Great British poet Chatterton PRB. Dead, or medically recoverable?

THE QUESTIONS


Is death beyond a rigorous resurrection science?


The controversial debate in transhumanism, challenges assumed values and considers the limits of archaeology.





  • How far can archaeological reconstruction go?


  • How small must measurement be to reassemble every detail relevant to a deceased person?


  • To the cell? To the mitochondria? To the atom? To the superstring?


  • How accurately can we plot history? To living memories? Further?


  • If we cant retrieve the data, can we reconstruct it by a probability matrix - a sort of quantum archaeology grid of all relevant past events?

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"When will the stone open it's tomb?"Ted Hughes

For generations men have said 'If there's one thing certain - it's death." But is this still true as archaeology accelerates, reconstructing more and more artefacts? We could reassemble ruins, then we could reassemble artefacts, then we could reassemble bones & skeletons, and recently full facial reconstructions of people dead for thousands of years have been reassembled. We have done more. Achieved by probability, these are provably so accurate that their friends would instantly recognize them.

What is to stop archaeology...assuming science and technology progress...from reviving a living person and their memories? And if we can do one person...what's to stop us resurrecting them all?


Why shouldn't death be reversible like, any other causal process?

We can turn ice to water and water back to ice, and we can break and re-form complex molecules with greater speeds and at diminishing cost, stealing energy from different sources to make up for entropy or energy loss.


Why couldn't we do that with deceased Man?

I will show in this paper that some species have already evolved ways to live forever, and Man may evolve to that.

Here are some ideas on how attempts to resurrect the dead may become possible using things like engineering technologies, mathematics and statistics.

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Quantum deals with the very small.

(Bosonic sodium). Mad randomness or intricate order?


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[center]Archaeologists deal with recovery of lost things


>>>>Go to Page 2 quantumarchaeology2



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#27 Julia36

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Posted 01 September 2015 - 04:53 AM

Better discussion on this closed thread:

 

http://www.longecity...topgams-thread/






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