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Does Melatonin improve the quality of your sleep?


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124 replies to this topic

Poll: Does Melatonin improve the quality of your sleep (258 member(s) have cast votes)

Does Melatonin improve the quality of your sleep

  1. Yes (116 votes [44.11%])

    Percentage of vote: 44.11%

  2. No (56 votes [21.29%])

    Percentage of vote: 21.29%

  3. Yes, but inconsistently (65 votes [24.71%])

    Percentage of vote: 24.71%

  4. I haven't taken it, but I still want to chime in, so thanks for including this particular poll-choice! (26 votes [9.89%])

    Percentage of vote: 9.89%

Is melatonin worth the Ciz-ash it Ciz-osts?

  1. Yes (154 votes [54.61%])

    Percentage of vote: 54.61%

  2. No (31 votes [10.99%])

    Percentage of vote: 10.99%

  3. Enough with the Hip-hop colloquialisms already... sheesh! (51 votes [18.09%])

    Percentage of vote: 18.09%

  4. I'm Mr. T! Got a problem with that, FOOL?!?!?! (46 votes [16.31%])

    Percentage of vote: 16.31%

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#121 Perek

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Posted 27 November 2015 - 05:57 PM

 

The effects of day-time exogenous melatonin administration on cardiac autonomic activity.
Harris AS1, Burgess HJ, Dawson D.  2001.
Melatonin has a functional role in the nocturnal regulation of sleep and thermoregulation. In addition to its action on peripheral receptors, melatonin may act by altering autonomic activity. To determine the effect of melatonin on cardiac autonomic activity, 5 mg of melatonin or placebo was orally administered to 12 young subjects at 14:00 hr, in a repeated measures design. Melatonin decreased sleep onset latency to Stage 2 sleep by 4.92+/-1.81 min (measured by Multiple Sleep Latency Tests), rectal temperature by 0.19+/-0.05 degrees C, and increased foot temperature by 0.74+/-0.45 degrees C (all P<0.05). Melatonin decreased heart rate by 3.66+/-1.68 beats/min (P<0.05) and pre-ejection period (measure of cardiac sympathetic activity) by 16.48+/-4.28 ms (P<0.05), but had no effect on respiratory sinus arrhythmia (measure of cardiac parasympathetic activity) (P>0.05). As the decrease in pre-ejection period is likely to have resulted from a decrease in blood pressure, these results do not confirm an effect of melatonin on cardiac sympathetic activity. However, the results do clearly indicate that melatonin is unlikely to drive the previously observed presleep increase in cardiac parasympathetic activity.

Melatonin possesses time-dependent hypnotic effects.
Tzischinsky O1, Lavie P.  1994.
The present study investigated the hypnotic effects of 5 mg melatonin in comparison with placebo when administered at 1200, 1700, 1900 and 2100 hours. Eighteen young adults were studied with the 7/13 ultrashort sleep-wake paradigm after an overnight sleep deprivation. Melatonin was administered according to a double-blind Latin square design. After each administration, melatonin significantly increased sleep propensity, the spectral power in the theta, delta and spindles bands, and subjective sleepiness. It significantly decreased the power in the alpha and beta bands and oral temperature. The latency to maximum effect varied linearly from 3 hours 40 minutes at 1200 hours to 1 hour at 2100 hours. These findings indicate that melatonin possesses a time-dependent hypnotic effect and suggest that endogenous melatonin may participate in sleep-wake regulation.

Dietary factors and fluctuating levels of melatonin
Katri Peuhkuri,* Nora Sihvola, and Riitta Korpela.  2012.
Melatonin is secreted principally by the pineal gland and mainly at nighttime. The primary physiological function is to convey information of the daily cycle of light and darkness to the body. In addition, it may have other health-related functions. Melatonin is synthesized from tryptophan, an essential dietary amino acid. It has been demonstrated that some nutritional factors, such as intake of vegetables, caffeine, and some vitamins and minerals, could modify melatonin production but with less intensity than light, the most dominant synchronizer of melatonin production. This review will focus on the nutritional factors apart from the intake of tryptophan that affect melatonin levels in humans. Overall, foods containing melatonin or promoting the synthesis of it by impacting the availability of tryptophan, as well those containing vitamins and minerals which are needed as co-factors and activators in the synthesis of melatonin, may modulate the levels of melatonin. Even so, the influence of daytime diet on the synthesis of nocturnal melatonin is limited, however, the influence of the diet seems to be more obvious on the daytime levels.

 

Melatonin in Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Related Disorders
Melatonin and mitochondrial function.
Melatonin-mitochondria interplay in health and disease.
Melatonin, mitochondria, and cellular bioenergetics.

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Food Sources

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https://books.google...AAQBAJ&pg=PA595
http://www.immunehea...-melatonin.html
http://nutritionfact...ural-melatonin/
http://www.onegreenp...nanas-and-more/
http://naturalsociet...elatonin-sleep/
http://hubpages.com/...ural-Sleep-Aids

 

Thanks, but guess we all know how to dig up dead rats diaries....


Edited by Perek, 27 November 2015 - 06:01 PM.

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#122 Strelok

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Posted 02 February 2016 - 01:17 AM

I've tried a lot of melatonin supplements over the years.  I recently tried Natrol's 3-mg time-released tablets, which I take 1 - 1.5 hours before bed.  I can honestly say that these tablets have worked better than any other melatonin tablets I've tried.  For the longest time I always seemed to do best with small doses of melatonin (300mcg - 1mg time-released), and never liked the effects of 3mg or higher immediate-release tabs. 

 

Now these aren't much of a game changer, but there is a noticeable improvement in sleep, and it's been working for me for about 2 weeks now. 


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#123 Kalliste

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Posted 03 February 2016 - 11:35 AM

I've tried a lot of melatonin supplements over the years.  I recently tried Natrol's 3-mg time-released tablets, which I take 1 - 1.5 hours before bed.  I can honestly say that these tablets have worked better than any other melatonin tablets I've tried.  For the longest time I always seemed to do best with small doses of melatonin (300mcg - 1mg time-released), and never liked the effects of 3mg or higher immediate-release tabs. 

 

Now these aren't much of a game changer, but there is a noticeable improvement in sleep, and it's been working for me for about 2 weeks now. 

 

I'm also using those Natrol, it's a very good source for Melatonin. Sometimes I'll bite it off at the middle if I know I have to get up early in the morning. Eating the entire pill is enough to make it hard for me to wake up even if my bladder is screaming at me.

One of those tabs is equal to a night of VERY good sleep for most time.

 

Note that they contain some amount of Vit B6 which is a very powerful dream-related agent, foor good or bad depending on your level of nightmares. Once I ate Ashwaganda, Lithium, B6 and Melatonin right before bed-time and I suffered the most chillingly vivid nightmare.

 

Add some HIT to the day and one of those before sleep an hour or so and I sleep like a baby.

Also started using UVEX after 8pm to avoid blue light.

 

Natrol also has a 10mg fast release pill that I will break into 4 pieces, it works wondersly fast. They taste like candy strawberry.

Some American/Australian parenting forums come up in Google on that pill, people use it to set quarreling kids to sleep, don't know how safe that is but it might be useful parenting advice :-D



#124 Kinesis

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 10:27 PM

A 1 mg melatonin tab before bed helps me go to sleep. The cool thing though is it’s totally transparent. I don’t feel drugged and there’s no residual effect when it wears off. Just get a good night’s sleep and wake up refreshed.

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#125 Nate-2004

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Posted 23 March 2018 - 10:14 PM

This poll needs an "it depends" option. It improves REM but possibly at the expense of deep sleep.


Edited by Nate-2004, 23 March 2018 - 10:14 PM.





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