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Acetylated Resveratrol


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Poll: Would you be interested? (33 member(s) have cast votes)

Actylated Resveratrol

  1. Definitely (23 votes [69.70%])

    Percentage of vote: 69.70%

  2. No (10 votes [30.30%])

    Percentage of vote: 30.30%

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#61 stevei

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Posted 07 April 2009 - 02:46 PM

It doesn't look particularly good value. The main reason to have better absorption is to get the cost down, no? We're not aware of any disadvantages other than cost if you simply consume the required amount of 99% resv each day? Reverse is $42.95 for 60 capsules, with a suggested dose of 2-4 caps per day. We know that each cap has 805mg of contents, but don't know how much of this is tri-acetylated resv.

On the other hand, you can get T-Rez with 60 capsules of 400mg 98% resv for $34.99. For the same price as 4 caps of Reverse each day, you could take 5 caps of T-Rez, giving 2g of 98% resv. So I find it hard to see any reason to go with Reverse instead of straight high purity resv.

#62 renwosing

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Posted 07 April 2009 - 03:51 PM

Maxwatt,

Its part n parcel of M&A.

Renwosing
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#63 alpine

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Posted 15 May 2009 - 04:55 PM

Bump for any updates on the theory behind acetylated resv
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#64 Furbix

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Posted 16 April 2010 - 10:57 AM

Bump for updates, want to try this.
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#65 michael084

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Posted 24 June 2010 - 11:37 AM

Any new studies on this? I am seeing more of it available on the market claiming to be naturally acetylated because of being from some algae or something. Kind of vague.
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#66 maxwatt

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Posted 24 June 2010 - 07:50 PM

Any new studies on this? I am seeing more of it available on the market claiming to be naturally acetylated because of being from some algae or something. Kind of vague.


No new studies, nor any old ones on acetylated resveratrol in humans that I am aware of, pub med search turns up nothing. I can find nothing on using algae as a source. Yeast and bacteria have been used to make resverarol, but not so far in an acetylated form.

However I did find this in vitro study, which indicates the tri-acetyl form of resveratrol will oppose some of the beneficial effects of resveratrol, and of di-acetyl resveratrol.

I would avoid all such products until they are better studied. We want to prolong life, not shorten it.

J Agric Food Chem. 2007 Jan 10;55(1):80-9.
Biological activity of acetylated phenolic compounds.
Fragopoulou E, Nomikos T, Karantonis HC, Apostolakis C, Pliakis E, Samiotaki M, Panayotou G, Antonopoulou S.

Department of Science of Nutrition--Dietetics, Harokopio University of Athens, 17671 Athens, Greece.
Abstract
In recent years an effort has been made to isolate and identify biologically active compounds that are included in the Mediterranean diet. The existence of naturally occurring acetylated phenolics, as well as studies with synthetic ones, provide evidence that acetyl groups could be correlated with their biological activity. Platelet activating factor (PAF) is implicated in atherosclerosis, whereas its inhibitors seem to play a protective role against cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to examine the biological activity of resveratrol and tyrosol and their acetylated derivatives as inhibitors of PAF-induced washed rabbit platelet aggregation. Acetylation of resveratrol and tyrosol was performed, and separation was achieved by HPLC. Acetylated derivatives were identified by negative mass spectrometry. The data showed that tyrosol and its monoacetylated derivatives act as PAF inhibitors, whereas diacetylated derivatives induce platelet aggregation. Resveratrol and its mono- and triacetylated derivatives exert similar inhibitory activity, whereas the diacetylated ones are more potent inhibitors. In conclusion, acetylated phenolics exert the same or even higher antithrombotic activity compared to the biological activity of the initial one.

PMID: 17199317



#67 michael084

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 01:53 AM

Any new studies on this? I am seeing more of it available on the market claiming to be naturally acetylated because of being from some algae or something. Kind of vague.


No new studies, nor any old ones on acetylated resveratrol in humans that I am aware of, pub med search turns up nothing. I can find nothing on using algae as a source. Yeast and bacteria have been used to make resverarol, but not so far in an acetylated form.

However I did find this in vitro study, which indicates the tri-acetyl form of resveratrol will oppose some of the beneficial effects of resveratrol, and of di-acetyl resveratrol.

I would avoid all such products until they are better studied. We want to prolong life, not shorten it.

J Agric Food Chem. 2007 Jan 10;55(1):80-9.
Biological activity of acetylated phenolic compounds.
Fragopoulou E, Nomikos T, Karantonis HC, Apostolakis C, Pliakis E, Samiotaki M, Panayotou G, Antonopoulou S.

Department of Science of Nutrition--Dietetics, Harokopio University of Athens, 17671 Athens, Greece.
Abstract
In recent years an effort has been made to isolate and identify biologically active compounds that are included in the Mediterranean diet. The existence of naturally occurring acetylated phenolics, as well as studies with synthetic ones, provide evidence that acetyl groups could be correlated with their biological activity. Platelet activating factor (PAF) is implicated in atherosclerosis, whereas its inhibitors seem to play a protective role against cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to examine the biological activity of resveratrol and tyrosol and their acetylated derivatives as inhibitors of PAF-induced washed rabbit platelet aggregation. Acetylation of resveratrol and tyrosol was performed, and separation was achieved by HPLC. Acetylated derivatives were identified by negative mass spectrometry. The data showed that tyrosol and its monoacetylated derivatives act as PAF inhibitors, whereas diacetylated derivatives induce platelet aggregation. Resveratrol and its mono- and triacetylated derivatives exert similar inhibitory activity, whereas the diacetylated ones are more potent inhibitors. In conclusion, acetylated phenolics exert the same or even higher antithrombotic activity compared to the biological activity of the initial one.

PMID: 17199317

Thanks, that is how I look at it too, just making sure before I ask the vendor for the studies he is claiming to have copies of.

#68 FILY

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Posted 26 July 2010 - 03:00 AM

We are tri-acetyl-resveratrol manufacturer from China. The price is about $900/kg. But main application is in cosmetic formula, not supplement.
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#69 zorba990

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Posted 11 January 2011 - 03:59 AM

bump. As a fan of NAC and ALCAR still wondering about this...

#70 zorba990

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Posted 15 May 2012 - 02:23 AM

Down to $500/KG now? Interesting to see the water solubility (if true):
http://www.ebiochem....ratrol-98-19633 I guess still waiting on toxicity studies....

#71 FILY

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 03:48 AM

Resveratrol analogues suppress proliferation and gene expression in human prostate cancer
LNCaP cells and are selectively biotransformed by rat liver extracts

Attached Files



#72 neuropill

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Posted 09 August 2012 - 02:03 PM

I first want to say that this forum is quite remarkable. I had never seen it before today and there is a lot of good information on here, not just a bunch of people screaming about things they know nothing about as with a lot of health forums across the internet. Secondly I want to say that I am by no means adverstising this product, I just want to gauge interest in it and I felt like this was a great place to start. I work for a dietary supplement company and we will soon be releasing 3,5,4'-triacetyl resveratrol. It will be in effective dosages (not yet determined) and contain ingredients such as piperine and others to decrease enzymatic activity and increase enzymatic competition. We are toying with the idea of using compounds such as HPBC and flax oil as a delivery system in a liquid capsule. After a lot of research we felt as though this compound was the best of both worlds when it comes to increasing lipophilicity without going as far as creating a trimethoxy compound which in a few studies has shown to have potent anti-tumor properties but negligble antioxidant properties. Would any of you be interested in this sort of product? What would be your concerns? I know one of your main concerns would be price but I can assure you we are not here to rip anyone off or provide a product that contains minute amounts of active ingredients. I have seen this too much in this industry and it is ridiculous. I am not sure of price just yet but it should not exceed $50.


What's your website?

#73 maxwatt

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 02:49 PM

I doubt they are pursuing this. Some Chinese companies offered the substance when the post was written, but there has been no research with this substance and we don't even know the toxicology much less if it might be good for you.

Interest in acetylated resveratrol was inspired by one of Sinclair's papers showing greater blood serum levels with 3,5,acetyl resveratrol. They offer 3,5,4'-triacetyl resveratrol which is a different substance, easier to synthesize but untested in rodents, much less in humans.

#74 bixbyte

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Posted 26 August 2012 - 01:51 PM

I doubt they are pursuing this. Some Chinese companies offered the substance when the post was written, but there has been no research with this substance and we don't even know the toxicology much less if it might be good for you.

Interest in acetylated resveratrol was inspired by one of Sinclair's papers showing greater blood serum levels with 3,5,acetyl resveratrol. They offer 3,5,4'-triacetyl resveratrol which is a different substance, easier to synthesize but untested in rodents, much less in humans.


Chinese sellers calling and email me day and night, they are stuck.
Prices are trending lower if you ask for a quote and make a lower offer.
But they overcharge on postage.



#75 MechTech

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Posted 14 September 2012 - 08:29 AM

Should we not be careful overstimulating the SIRT1 gene with a triacetyl. I read some were that it can expedite spread of some cancers?

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#76 Libertarian Longevity

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Posted 26 October 2012 - 02:32 PM

(snip)

If you don't have any plasma data on this compound or tox issues this is what I could see happening.

Lets use numbers 1,2,3 for each hydroxy group. You could have any one of these methoxy groups getting converted to a hydroxyl group. This gives a few new compounds that we don't know what proteins they will target or if they will target SIRT1. I agree a methoxy version will not be metabolized as fast but do any of its metabolites have deleterious effects? Maybe we could all pitch in a get some mice? That would be pretty cool. We could have a control group on just pure resveratrol and then a group on methoxy resveratrol. Do you have the ability to do this?


For one thing, he is talking about tri-acetylated resveratrol, not methoxy. Published data on 4'methoxy-resveratrol indicates it is inactive vis-a-vis Sirt1. 4'-acetyl-resveratrol is very active, almost time release on the cellular level, according to published papers by Sinclair and other Sirtris scientists. Tri-acetyl resveratrol I have seen no published data for. I do know a chemist who synthesized it, it's much easier to make than 4', but I have no idea what he did with it, if it worked, or if he even took it or fed it to mice. That he disappeared shortly after he announced he had synthesized it doesn't give me a warm fuzzy feeling, even though that's probably a coincidence. He also got his masters and took a real job.

It is a very good idea to keep some pet mice around. If you tell me the results on the mice, I would have more confidence in possible human applications. There is a good possibility this is superior to resveratrol by avoiding conjugation by the liver before it is absorbed by one's cells. This could be a very good thing. But until we see some test results, this is all wishful thinking.

For that matter, speaking of resveratrol analogues, polydatin is promising and available if you know where to look. Some Japanese researchers have reported on its metabolites, and it results in high blood levels of resveratrol, higher than one gets by taking resveratrol. It seems to bypass intestinal glucoronidation and first pass liver metabolism, giving quite a spike.

From a source supplier I purchased 100 grams capsules with each capsule containing 100mg of 4'-acetyl-resveratrol and 100mg of Pterostilbene. At the time I purchased as part of a bigger order with other products I was considering using for my own health/longevity retail site. The retail site never really got off the ground, but I was left with this large amount of capsules. Sometimes I take them regularly and sometimes not so regularly. Also sometimes I'll take one capsule when taking them, other times I'll take 2-4. I've never gotten sick or had any negative reactions from taking them, although they aren't like drugs which you feel any immediate effects you are aware of when you take them if you are already in good health.

Just from taking them myself and allowing friends who are interested to have some my supply it has already went down enough where I'm pretty sure I have less than 100 capsules left, but after the research done in japan on how much acetyl resveratrol increases your chances of survival even if exposed to high doses of radiation and its ability to negate much of the harmful effects of radiation, I think keeping some in any emergency first aid kit would prove beneficial in taking them if I or people I know are exposed to harmful levels of radiation or run into other problems where these could prove beneficial.

Whether all the ones I've taken as sort of a health supplement has increased my lifespan or negated some of the harmful effects of when I smoke ciggs, I don't know for sure. Although I like to think they have a positive health effect and since they cause no bad side effects, taking them as a daily supplement doesn't cause any problems as far as I know. So I think 4'-acetyl-resveratrol is a safe supplement which potentially has some very positive health benefits, although from my use I can only really establish that it is safe and doesn't cause bad health effects since I didn't do any testing on myself with how it might be working inside my body.

Edited by Libertarian Longevity, 26 October 2012 - 02:38 PM.





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