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Sinclair and New Resveratrol Product


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#61 Anthony_Loera

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Posted 25 August 2008 - 02:32 AM

Anthony,

In the price watch thread you said you had some Viv*x. Is there any stuff that falls out of solution? If not, then either sorbitol is a great resveratrol solvent (I've already discovered that glycerol is a terrible solvent.) or this is a homeopathic product.



Hmm... Let me pout it our into a tall glass and leave it overnight...

Anthony

#62 Anthony_Loera

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Posted 25 August 2008 - 02:40 AM

Anthony,

In the price watch thread you said you had some Viv*x. Is there any stuff that falls out of solution? If not, then either sorbitol is a great resveratrol solvent (I've already discovered that glycerol is a terrible solvent.) or this is a homeopathic product.



Hmm... Let me pout it our into a tall glass and leave it overnight...

Anthony


Hehehee.... I just looked at the bottles again.

Did I say tall glass?Woops!
My mistake, more like a shot glass...

yes one of the bottle contents fit into a shot glass. I believe each bottle contains about 50ml.

Cheers
A

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#63 Anthony_Loera

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Posted 25 August 2008 - 12:18 PM

Picture of Viv*x and shot glass is attached.

A

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#64 Crepulance

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 08:12 AM

Ali, hey, I hear what you're saying. And yes there's a possibility that there are flaws and cracks in his logic, and hell, there's even the chance that he did sell out for a lesser product, you're right, I don't know, and I'm not aware of the proof. All I have to go on is his reputation, but that holds a lot of weight and merit. So with all those questions you've posed, I temporarily trust that he too has thought through all of this prior to attaching his name to it. Is that to say I won't be proven wrong, no. But I'd rather wait to be proven wrong then spend my time trying to prove him wrong. This is all due to his stature. Sure I'm sure, if not positive, that there is a cheaper method to achieve the same solution of ingredients that comprises his drink, but as committed as a lot of people on these threads are, I can guarantee you a large percentage of the population don't want to deal with measuring, and blending whey shakes, and this that and the other that is all over these boards to get the solutions just so. McDonald's is McDonald's for one main reason, convenience. Public wants convenience. And Anthony, when I said superior, obviously that's just speculation due to his stature, but I certainly wasn't meaning it in regards to price, yes, the pricing is ridiculous, but people will be willing to pay it. I back the boy until evidence comes up to the contrary about the effectiveness of his product, not $, and if that evidence comes out, I'll be quick to jump ship. So, we have some great scientific minds on these threads, let's splish and splash and test this thing, put it to the guantlet, seems like something these threads are good at, and let's get some results. Obviously not long term, I just mean in terms of product composition and validity. All the best Ressies...


Crep

Anthony,

In the price watch thread you said you had some Viv*x. Is there any stuff that falls out of solution? If not, then either sorbitol is a great resveratrol solvent (I've already discovered that glycerol is a terrible solvent.) or this is a homeopathic product.



Hmm... Let me pout it our into a tall glass and leave it overnight...

Anthony


Hehehee.... I just looked at the bottles again.

Did I say tall glass?Woops!
My mistake, more like a shot glass...

yes one of the bottle contents fit into a shot glass. I believe each bottle contains about 50ml.

Cheers
A



#65 hmm

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 03:09 PM

Somebody with a little bit of "street-cred" needs to try this stuff and report on it. Maxwatt should forgo his normal regimen for a month or so, and the rest of us should chip in enough money to purchase a few bottles of this stuff for him, so he can put the toe-test on it. He would need to figure out the minimum amount necessary to ingest to make himself feel at least as good as he feels on his current regimen...

Edited by hmm, 28 August 2008 - 03:36 PM.


#66 maxwatt

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 06:52 PM

Somebody with a little bit of "street-cred" needs to try this stuff and report on it. Maxwatt should forgo his normal regimen for a month or so, and the rest of us should chip in enough money to purchase a few bottles of this stuff for him, so he can put the toe-test on it. He would need to figure out the minimum amount necessary to ingest to make himself feel at least as good as he feels on his current regimen...


I might die trying

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#67 krillin

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Posted 29 August 2008 - 03:44 AM

I might die trying

A little sorbitol-induced osmotic diarrhea never hurt anyone. Chug chug chug!

#68 hmm

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Posted 29 August 2008 - 02:52 PM

Somebody with a little bit of "street-cred" needs to try this stuff and report on it. Maxwatt should forgo his normal regimen for a month or so, and the rest of us should chip in enough money to purchase a few bottles of this stuff for him, so he can put the toe-test on it. He would need to figure out the minimum amount necessary to ingest to make himself feel at least as good as he feels on his current regimen...


I might die trying

Wow, you have a very low opinion of this product! I would have thought you would exhaust the generosity of the people purchasing the product for you a long time before you could do any damage to your health!

#69 maxwatt

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Posted 29 August 2008 - 04:48 PM

Somebody with a little bit of "street-cred" needs to try this stuff and report on it. Maxwatt should forgo his normal regimen for a month or so, and the rest of us should chip in enough money to purchase a few bottles of this stuff for him, so he can put the toe-test on it. He would need to figure out the minimum amount necessary to ingest to make himself feel at least as good as he feels on his current regimen...


I might die trying

Wow, you have a very low opinion of this product! I would have thought you would exhaust the generosity of the people purchasing the product for you a long time before you could do any damage to your health!


But I would be foregoing what I consider a known benefit to my health for something unlikely to have the same benefit.

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#70 krillin

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Posted 29 August 2008 - 11:09 PM

Somebody with a little bit of "street-cred" needs to try this stuff and report on it. Maxwatt should forgo his normal regimen for a month or so, and the rest of us should chip in enough money to purchase a few bottles of this stuff for him, so he can put the toe-test on it. He would need to figure out the minimum amount necessary to ingest to make himself feel at least as good as he feels on his current regimen...


I might die trying

Wow, you have a very low opinion of this product! I would have thought you would exhaust the generosity of the people purchasing the product for you a long time before you could do any damage to your health!

If people have money to burn, why not just have the stuff tested for resveratrol content? Or does Shaklee make you sign a "do not analyze" agreement when you buy it?

#71 hmm

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Posted 30 August 2008 - 12:53 AM

Somebody with a little bit of "street-cred" needs to try this stuff and report on it. Maxwatt should forgo his normal regimen for a month or so, and the rest of us should chip in enough money to purchase a few bottles of this stuff for him, so he can put the toe-test on it. He would need to figure out the minimum amount necessary to ingest to make himself feel at least as good as he feels on his current regimen...


I might die trying

Wow, you have a very low opinion of this product! I would have thought you would exhaust the generosity of the people purchasing the product for you a long time before you could do any damage to your health!

If people have money to burn, why not just have the stuff tested for resveratrol content? Or does Shaklee make you sign a "do not analyze" agreement when you buy it?

Or perhaps Hedgehog could perform some blood serum tests with Vivix. But still, even if the blood serum levels of RSV turned out low, wouldn't there still be some lingering doubt that just maybe --the other ingredients are having some (as of yet) underappreciated kind of super-synergistic effect?

One reason I hate to see this product totally dismissed is that if Sinclair participated in marketing such a useless product, it leads me to believe he did so because he ran across enough evidence to convince himself that Resveratrol wasn't ever going to amount to much. So putting RSV in a Shaklee product was about the best that was ever going to come of it. I don't like this because I still harbor vague hopes of finding a way to build up to a dosage level that would actually increase life or health span.

Edited by hmm, 30 August 2008 - 12:53 AM.


#72 fredsdeadfriend

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Posted 23 October 2008 - 05:42 PM

Somebody with a little bit of "street-cred" needs to try this stuff and report on it. Maxwatt should forgo his normal regimen for a month or so, and the rest of us should chip in enough money to purchase a few bottles of this stuff for him, so he can put the toe-test on it. He would need to figure out the minimum amount necessary to ingest to make himself feel at least as good as he feels on his current regimen...


I might die trying

Wow, you have a very low opinion of this product! I would have thought you would exhaust the generosity of the people purchasing the product for you a long time before you could do any damage to your health!

If people have money to burn, why not just have the stuff tested for resveratrol content? Or does Shaklee make you sign a "do not analyze" agreement when you buy it?

Or perhaps Hedgehog could perform some blood serum tests with Vivix. But still, even if the blood serum levels of RSV turned out low, wouldn't there still be some lingering doubt that just maybe --the other ingredients are having some (as of yet) underappreciated kind of super-synergistic effect?

One reason I hate to see this product totally dismissed is that if Sinclair participated in marketing such a useless product, it leads me to believe he did so because he ran across enough evidence to convince himself that Resveratrol wasn't ever going to amount to much. So putting RSV in a Shaklee product was about the best that was ever going to come of it. I don't like this because I still harbor vague hopes of finding a way to build up to a dosage level that would actually increase life or health span.






WOW! You all really hate the entire concept of MLM or direct marketing, eh? Sounds like some of you might be too smart for your own good. The way you all seem to dismiss anything and everything associated with direct marketing reminds me of past discussions I've had with people on various subjects, but especially religion and politics. It amazes me how some people seem to just know everything and how they seem to always think that they are right.

Now I'm sure this post will get deleted and considered just a flame, but that is or was not my intention. Nor is it my intention to sell anything to anyone on this forum. I am scared to admit that I am a Shaklee dist for fear that I'll now be branded a schmuck or a dupe or whatever else and anything I say from this point on will be completely disregarded. And to think I got accepted into West Point out of hs and later finished 4 years of college, what luck must have been on my side to do all that seeing as I am just a stupid dupe that would waste his money on the crap Shaklee puts out.

Well, I started taking that waste of a product called Vitalizer about 3 months ago and although I didn't notice a difference, a close friend of mine swore it gave me more energy. Then I ran out and was without it for about 2 weeks and then I did notice a difference. I became depressed, tired and lazy that 2nd week I was not taking those multivitamins. I felt like I did before I started taking them. Now you all are so smart, tell me, is it a placebo effect? I've been back on the Vitalizer for about a week now, and I also added a daily dose of Vivix as well and I've started to feel more energetic. Again, is this just a placebo effect? Am I imagining things? I must be, because Vivix, according to all of you is a worthless, overpriced scam of a product, as is the vitalizer.

Oh, and btw, I am so stupid that somehow I only pay about $80 for my months supply of Vivix and less than that for my Vitalizer. Maybe because I'm so stupid I don't realize that I get a 15% discount as a member and another 10% discount by putting the products on autoship. I also get a free months supply of Vitalizer because I have them both on autoship. Oh, and how stupid I am for forgetting that the company actually pays me money to buy products as well, so that reduces the price I pay as well, to about 50% of the srp. Wow, how stupid of me to have figured out how direct marketing works.


But seriously, is it that impossible to believe that any MLM products can be of high quality?

#73 niner

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Posted 23 October 2008 - 11:46 PM

WOW! You all really hate the entire concept of MLM or direct marketing, eh? Sounds like some of you might be too smart for your own good. The way you all seem to dismiss anything and everything associated with direct marketing reminds me of past discussions I've had with people on various subjects, but especially religion and politics. It amazes me how some people seem to just know everything and how they seem to always think that they are right.

Got a little chip on your shoulder, eh Fred?

Now I'm sure this post will get deleted and considered just a flame, but that is or was not my intention. Nor is it my intention to sell anything to anyone on this forum. I am scared to admit that I am a Shaklee dist for fear that I'll now be branded a schmuck or a dupe or whatever else and anything I say from this point on will be completely disregarded. And to think I got accepted into West Point out of hs and later finished 4 years of college, what luck must have been on my side to do all that seeing as I am just a stupid dupe that would waste his money on the crap Shaklee puts out.

Sigh. Did you take any courses on pharmacology at West Point or the 4 years of college?

Well, I started taking that waste of a product called Vitalizer about 3 months ago and although I didn't notice a difference, a close friend of mine swore it gave me more energy. Then I ran out and was without it for about 2 weeks and then I did notice a difference. I became depressed, tired and lazy that 2nd week I was not taking those multivitamins. I felt like I did before I started taking them. Now you all are so smart, tell me, is it a placebo effect? I've been back on the Vitalizer for about a week now, and I also added a daily dose of Vivix as well and I've started to feel more energetic. Again, is this just a placebo effect? Am I imagining things? I must be, because Vivix, according to all of you is a worthless, overpriced scam of a product, as is the vitalizer.

Maybe it's a placebo effect, or maybe you're getting ripped off for some overpriced ALCAR or GTE; without knowing exactly what's in these products, who can say? Either way I'm not impressed.

But seriously, is it that impossible to believe that any MLM products can be of high quality?

A sensible person would consider the odds, as well as past history of MLM products. Anything with multiple levels of people taking a profit out of the system would have a hard time being a good value.

#74 Anthony_Loera

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Posted 30 October 2008 - 07:36 PM

hmm...
I remain skeptical at the least... specially after seeing Dr S. Hold up a nice 250mg Capsule below when he talked about resveratrol in his latest interview:

Attached File  Res_250MGx.jpg   11.71KB   11 downloads

A

Edited by Anthony_Loera, 30 October 2008 - 07:37 PM.


#75 TianZi

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Posted 01 November 2008 - 07:13 AM

"Well, I started taking that waste of a product called Vitalizer about 3 months ago and although I didn't notice a difference, a close friend of mine swore it gave me more energy. Then I ran out and was without it for about 2 weeks and then I did notice a difference. I became depressed, tired and lazy that 2nd week I was not taking those multivitamins."


During those 4 years at West Point, you should have honed your critical thinking skills. That means questioning the worth of testimonial anecdotes, and learning how objectively to compare and analyze true research (and recognize as a fraud that which merely masquerades as it).

Edited by TianZi, 01 November 2008 - 07:24 AM.


#76 Anthony_Loera

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Posted 03 November 2008 - 10:09 PM

These are our 250mg capsules.

Hmm.... maybe I should go with red/white capsule colors as well...
hmmmm let me think about that one:


Cheers
A

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#77 jcarlson892007

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Posted 08 December 2008 - 08:45 PM

These are our 250mg capsules.

Hmm.... maybe I should go with red/white capsule colors as well...
hmmmm let me think about that one:


Cheers
A


Anthony,

After reading through this forum topic, it is clear you are slightly biased and have strong intentions to defend your own product by cutting down other strong competitors. I am 19 and have taken Vivix for several months now and during that time my eye sight has improved dramatically. After noticing this, my opthamologist also noted that my iris's looked surprisingly bright and healthy. He asked if I knew why there was such improvements and I told him I was taking Shaklee Vivix. Not only that, but I have noticeably more energy. Now, for how long I've been taking this product, these results are surprising, but they are real. Do you dispute these results?

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#78 geddarkstorm

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Posted 08 December 2008 - 11:44 PM

Anthony,

After reading through this forum topic, it is clear you are slightly biased and have strong intentions to defend your own product by cutting down other strong competitors. I am 19 and have taken Vivix for several months now and during that time my eye sight has improved dramatically. After noticing this, my opthamologist also noted that my iris's looked surprisingly bright and healthy. He asked if I knew why there was such improvements and I told him I was taking Shaklee Vivix. Not only that, but I have noticeably more energy. Now, for how long I've been taking this product, these results are surprising, but they are real. Do you dispute these results?


There is nothing wrong, and only sensibly wise, about Anthony and the forum members wanting to test the claims of a product, as well as try to analyze what is actually in it. It is very important to know what one is taking, even for the simple fact of knowing what interactions with other medicines, supplements, and foods there might be; and for dosage reasons. At any rate, that's cool it worked well for you.

#79 maxwatt

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Posted 09 December 2008 - 02:02 AM

These are our 250mg capsules.

Hmm.... maybe I should go with red/white capsule colors as well...
hmmmm let me think about that one:


Cheers
A


Anthony,

After reading through this forum topic, it is clear you are slightly biased and have strong intentions to defend your own product by cutting down other strong competitors. I am 19 and have taken Vivix for several months now and during that time my eye sight has improved dramatically. After noticing this, my opthamologist also noted that my iris's looked surprisingly bright and healthy. He asked if I knew why there was such improvements and I told him I was taking Shaklee Vivix. Not only that, but I have noticeably more energy. Now, for how long I've been taking this product, these results are surprising, but they are real. Do you dispute these results?


Not exactly, as there is nothing to dispute in an anecdotal report such as yours. Such improvements can be explained by the placebo effect, especially with a sample size of one. Not to say you are not experiencing a sense of improved well-being, but without a control group of any kind, this could be due to other factors, or the mind's response to expectations.

Edited by maxwatt, 09 December 2008 - 10:40 AM.


#80 niner

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Posted 09 December 2008 - 06:37 AM

After reading through this forum topic, it is clear you are slightly biased and have strong intentions to defend your own product by cutting down other strong competitors. I am 19 and have taken Vivix for several months now and during that time my eye sight has improved dramatically. After noticing this, my opthamologist also noted that my iris's looked surprisingly bright and healthy. He asked if I knew why there was such improvements and I told him I was taking Shaklee Vivix. Not only that, but I have noticeably more energy. Now, for how long I've been taking this product, these results are surprising, but they are real. Do you dispute these results?

Do I dispute them? Umm, yes. 19 year olds tend not to have age-related eye problems nor do they usually lack for energy. They tend not to have money to throw around for overpriced supplements, and tend not to write with your voice. Call me a cynic, but you sound like a Shaklee dealer. The fact that this is your first post here is consistent with sock-puppetry, though all of these might just be coincidences... Welcome to ImmInst!

#81 jcarlson892007

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Posted 12 December 2008 - 05:50 PM

After reading through this forum topic, it is clear you are slightly biased and have strong intentions to defend your own product by cutting down other strong competitors. I am 19 and have taken Vivix for several months now and during that time my eye sight has improved dramatically. After noticing this, my opthamologist also noted that my iris's looked surprisingly bright and healthy. He asked if I knew why there was such improvements and I told him I was taking Shaklee Vivix. Not only that, but I have noticeably more energy. Now, for how long I've been taking this product, these results are surprising, but they are real. Do you dispute these results?

Do I dispute them? Umm, yes. 19 year olds tend not to have age-related eye problems nor do they usually lack for energy. They tend not to have money to throw around for overpriced supplements, and tend not to write with your voice. Call me a cynic, but you sound like a Shaklee dealer. The fact that this is your first post here is consistent with sock-puppetry, though all of these might just be coincidences... Welcome to ImmInst!


Thank you for your responses. They are indeed coincidences, but I'm sorry past posts have cause you to question the validity of my identity. I am 19 years old, and I am a Shaklee member, but not an active distributor, and I am in college right now. My parents buy the Vivix for me because after I tried one month of it and my near-sightedness greatly improved. Not only that, my pupils have always had problems constricting in brighter lit areas (due to a childhood brain tumor) and after about a month of taking Vivix they constrict much better in daylight (my opthamalogist noticed this as well). I am still taking Vivix so that we can see if it gets better and see what my opthamalogist has to during my next appointment. I don't have a lack of energy, but I have more since taking Vivix. It should also be noted that I have taken nutritional supplements as well for the past few years. Forgive me if it sounds like I'm trying to sell Shaklee products (I wouldn't attempt such a thing) but I saw that this forum was about Dr. Sinclair and Shaklee Vivix so I figured I should share my personal results.

I also want to note something interesting that I had not learned until hearing Shaklee's chairman of medical affairs Dr. Mcmanus speak, which is that legally Shaklee can only market Vivix towards anti-aging purposes. Now, this is probably the main benefit of Vivix as it is, but through all of the clinical trials Vivix has shown significant effects towards a lot of diseases and likewise that Shaklee simply cannot advertise because Vivix is not a 'drug'. Many people are taking Vivix for all sorts of things and are seeing results. I sincerely hope Shaklee publishes a large scale study on Vivix like they did in the 50 year study of its supplements. Anyways, I guess I don't have any anti-aging topics to discuss just yet, although it's never to late to start thinking about that. I appreciate your responses.

#82 Anthony_Loera

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Posted 12 December 2008 - 06:18 PM

JCarlson,

For a dietary supplement maker to market an herbal supplement legally, they must understand that only structure/function claims are permitted on dietary supplements:
http://www.cfsan.fda...s/sclmguid.html

Most supplement folks adhere to these rules, although some that do not receive warning letters from the FDA. If things aren't changed after the letter arrives, any disease claims made by any dietary supplement company allows the FDA to stop a dietary supplement from being sold, and label the supplement as a drug... which then has a whole other set of other restrictions that apply.

Herbal Resveratrol from any company, has to adhere to these rules on their labels and company website.

However, most folks who have a dreadful disease will likely go to Google scholar, and do an investigation on their own and decide what to naturally take for an issue. They go directly to the studies made at unbiased Universities and leave the flashy neon marketing behind.

This is certainly the way to go, and how I started finding out about the benefits myself some years back. (Of course I had some help from Dr. V, who went over the information with me...) But, Google scholar is a good place to start if you are looking for alternatives.


A

Edited by Anthony_Loera, 12 December 2008 - 06:24 PM.


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#83 jcarlson892007

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Posted 13 December 2008 - 06:05 AM

JCarlson,

For a dietary supplement maker to market an herbal supplement legally, they must understand that only structure/function claims are permitted on dietary supplements:
http://www.cfsan.fda...s/sclmguid.html

Most supplement folks adhere to these rules, although some that do not receive warning letters from the FDA. If things aren't changed after the letter arrives, any disease claims made by any dietary supplement company allows the FDA to stop a dietary supplement from being sold, and label the supplement as a drug... which then has a whole other set of other restrictions that apply.

Herbal Resveratrol from any company, has to adhere to these rules on their labels and company website.

However, most folks who have a dreadful disease will likely go to Google scholar, and do an investigation on their own and decide what to naturally take for an issue. They go directly to the studies made at unbiased Universities and leave the flashy neon marketing behind.

This is certainly the way to go, and how I started finding out about the benefits myself some years back. (Of course I had some help from Dr. V, who went over the information with me...) But, Google scholar is a good place to start if you are looking for alternatives.


A



Anthony,

I am certain that a much larger percentage of internet users with a disease would visit WebMD as opposed to researching university studies on Google scholar, however more smart the latter option would be. I agree that doing your own research--especially if it means finding a natural alternative--is very important to do for any medical condition. As for me, I don't have a disease. I am merely using Vivix to see how it affects my health. Dr. "Sellout" Sinclair spent two years with Shaklee developing it so I'm not too worried about adverse effects.

#84 Ringostarr

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Posted 13 December 2008 - 06:36 PM

JCarlson,

For a dietary supplement maker to market an herbal supplement legally, they must understand that only structure/function claims are permitted on dietary supplements:
http://www.cfsan.fda...s/sclmguid.html

Most supplement folks adhere to these rules, although some that do not receive warning letters from the FDA. If things aren't changed after the letter arrives, any disease claims made by any dietary supplement company allows the FDA to stop a dietary supplement from being sold, and label the supplement as a drug... which then has a whole other set of other restrictions that apply.

Herbal Resveratrol from any company, has to adhere to these rules on their labels and company website.

However, most folks who have a dreadful disease will likely go to Google scholar, and do an investigation on their own and decide what to naturally take for an issue. They go directly to the studies made at unbiased Universities and leave the flashy neon marketing behind.

This is certainly the way to go, and how I started finding out about the benefits myself some years back. (Of course I had some help from Dr. V, who went over the information with me...) But, Google scholar is a good place to start if you are looking for alternatives.


A



Anthony,

I am certain that a much larger percentage of internet users with a disease would visit WebMD as opposed to researching university studies on Google scholar, however more smart the latter option would be. I agree that doing your own research--especially if it means finding a natural alternative--is very important to do for any medical condition. As for me, I don't have a disease. I am merely using Vivix to see how it affects my health. Dr. "Sellout" Sinclair spent two years with Shaklee developing it so I'm not too worried about adverse effects.


It seems at though Viv# is just resveratrol added to a liquid muscadine extract. Not that complicated or advanced - that being said, my guess is that it works just fine for general health maintenance.
What bothers me is that Vivi$ acts like it has some proprietary holy grail. Heck, it does not even mention the muscadine grape - it calls it super grape. It says it has secured all the muscadine vineyards so no one else can offer a similar product. Garbage.

#85 jcarlson892007

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Posted 14 December 2008 - 11:47 PM

JCarlson,

For a dietary supplement maker to market an herbal supplement legally, they must understand that only structure/function claims are permitted on dietary supplements:
http://www.cfsan.fda...s/sclmguid.html

Most supplement folks adhere to these rules, although some that do not receive warning letters from the FDA. If things aren't changed after the letter arrives, any disease claims made by any dietary supplement company allows the FDA to stop a dietary supplement from being sold, and label the supplement as a drug... which then has a whole other set of other restrictions that apply.

Herbal Resveratrol from any company, has to adhere to these rules on their labels and company website.

However, most folks who have a dreadful disease will likely go to Google scholar, and do an investigation on their own and decide what to naturally take for an issue. They go directly to the studies made at unbiased Universities and leave the flashy neon marketing behind.

This is certainly the way to go, and how I started finding out about the benefits myself some years back. (Of course I had some help from Dr. V, who went over the information with me...) But, Google scholar is a good place to start if you are looking for alternatives.


A



Anthony,

I am certain that a much larger percentage of internet users with a disease would visit WebMD as opposed to researching university studies on Google scholar, however more smart the latter option would be. I agree that doing your own research--especially if it means finding a natural alternative--is very important to do for any medical condition. As for me, I don't have a disease. I am merely using Vivix to see how it affects my health. Dr. "Sellout" Sinclair spent two years with Shaklee developing it so I'm not too worried about adverse effects.


It seems at though Viv# is just resveratrol added to a liquid muscadine extract. Not that complicated or advanced - that being said, my guess is that it works just fine for general health maintenance.
What bothers me is that Vivi$ acts like it has some proprietary holy grail. Heck, it does not even mention the muscadine grape - it calls it super grape. It says it has secured all the muscadine vineyards so no one else can offer a similar product. Garbage.


Ringostarr,

To correct your post, Shaklee states on their site the scientific name of the muscadine grape. They call it the super grape because it contains the polyphenol Elagic acid, something not found in ordinary grapes. The resveratrol used in Vivix is derived from the muscadine grape's root, one of the most pure sources of resveratrol found in nature. Finally, Shaklee has secured some of the largest growers in the world, not all of the growers. Shaklee's advertising for Vivix may seem bold, but as a marketing major I know the importance of strong advertising for a company like Shaklee, especially when they don't put money toward television and print advertisement. In a few months I'll post whether or not I have further improvements from the Vivix.

#86 Anthony_Loera

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Posted 15 December 2008 - 03:02 AM

jcarlson892007,

I now do not believe you are using Vivi* at all, after your last post.

Here is why:
The resveratrol in Vivi* does not come from the muscadine grape. According to the label from the vivi* package, (which anyone can read if they actually had the product...) It states that the resveratrol comes from polygonum cuspidatum.

It does not state that the resveratrol comes from muscadine on the label. The label is what the FDA (and anyone else interested) will find where the resveratrol actually comes from. I doubt Shac**** would create a product that would defy FDA supplement label regulations.

Cheers
A

Edited by Anthony_Loera, 15 December 2008 - 03:03 AM.


#87 steelheader

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Posted 15 December 2008 - 05:41 AM

[quote
The resveratrol used in Vivix is derived from the muscadine grape's root, one of the most pure sources of resveratrol found in nature.
[/quote]

Now I know you are pulling our leg. No one is dumb enough to believe that grape vineyards would be uprooted to get reservatrol from the roots!

#88 bentl

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Posted 15 December 2008 - 08:01 AM

Going back to earlier in this thread (#27), there was reference to
ellagic acid interacting synergistically with resveratrol and that the muscadine grape was the only grape that contained ellagic acid. Shaklee seems to be pounding on that "super grape" angle but who says you have to use grapes?

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#89 jcarlson892007

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Posted 15 December 2008 - 05:43 PM

jcarlson892007,

I now do not believe you are using Vivi* at all, after your last post.

Here is why:
The resveratrol in Vivi* does not come from the muscadine grape. According to the label from the vivi* package, (which anyone can read if they actually had the product...) It states that the resveratrol comes from polygonum cuspidatum.

It does not state that the resveratrol comes from muscadine on the label. The label is what the FDA (and anyone else interested) will find where the resveratrol actually comes from. I doubt Shac**** would create a product that would defy FDA supplement label regulations.

Cheers
A


Anthony,

My apologies. The label said (root) after the trans-resveratrol and I assumed it meant the root of the muscadine. It is indeed the japanese knotweed as you said. Not sure how this misunderstanding would mean I'm not taking Vivix though. Do you get your resveratrol for revgenetics from the polygonum cuspidatum as well?

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#90 Anthony_Loera

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Posted 15 December 2008 - 06:52 PM

JCarlson,

99% of the supplements sold use resveratrol from Polygonum Cuspidatum.
I am not asking you to stop taking your favorite supplement, just to have your facts straight and not embellish it with incorrect information.

So far from your posts, you cite "Ellagic Acid" as the main motivator to buy this product, and not resveratrol... which can be found in many other products that are cheaper in price.

Is that the sum of your statements?

A




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