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Most $$$ Jobs in 10 years


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#1 Nihilated

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Posted 21 August 2008 - 03:48 AM


In your opinion, what are the 5-10 most lucrative jobs going to be in the next 10 years?

Here's my list:
1. Nuclear engineering
2. Chemical engineering
3. Aerospace engineering
4. Nanotechnolgy
5. Medical
6. Law
7. Management Information System / Database Security



- nihil ex nihilo

#2 Shepard

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Posted 21 August 2008 - 04:10 AM

Polishing the supercomputers housing our AGI overlords?
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#3 Jimmy

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Posted 21 August 2008 - 07:05 AM

1) Biology Research, Bio-tech companies are starting everywhere!

2) A microbiology BS with a business minor can get you in the door of most industry labs. (As the supervisor, or lab manager, which is about $100,000.00 per year. My boss makes that while I, a lab tech, make about $40,000.00 per year. I need to get back to college and finish my degree!)

3) Medical Nanotechnology is becoming a new field of science, but I don't know what the pay is (I bet it would be a very nice income.)

4) Nuclear may be going down hill since so many people are against it. Eco-friendly (wind or solar may take over for energy, also bio-diesel or Hydrogen fuel cells)

5) Aerospace is good if you can get on at NASA. (Univ. Ala here in Huntsville is a NASA college, so that may be a good way to get in the back door. (Get to know people who work for NASA,"It's not what you know, but who you know," still is a true saying) But there may be budget cuts if the wrong person gets in the white house.

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#4 kismet

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Posted 21 August 2008 - 01:55 PM

But isn't nuclear energy pretty eco-friendly if we don't fu*k up and let our plants burn down, get bombed by terrorists and then somehow get rid of the waste?

#5 Athanasios

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Posted 21 August 2008 - 04:25 PM

Ha, I wish a medical researcher/engineer will be able to make the dough of a petrol engineer but I doubt it. I remember in one of my engineering physics courses, I was the only one in a biology related field. There were a few civil Es but everyone else was petrol. If I were to guess (60% weight) on the best engineering job, in terms of money in 10 years, it would still be petrol.

#6 platypus

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Posted 21 August 2008 - 05:07 PM

5) Aerospace is good if you can get on at NASA. (Univ. Ala here in Huntsville is a NASA college, so that may be a good way to get in the back door. (Get to know people who work for NASA,"It's not what you know, but who you know," still is a true saying) But there may be budget cuts if the wrong person gets in the white house.

I don't think NASA pays it employees very well but I guess the jobs could be very interesting.

Anything related to biology would be good in the future, as would petroleum and petroleum-geology related things, engineering for oil exploration etc. etc. The highest paying jobs will anyway be in finance, as today.

#7 lunarsolarpower

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Posted 21 August 2008 - 07:19 PM

In your opinion, what are the 5-10 most lucrative jobs going to be in the next 10 years?


You couldn't even be fully trained for some of today's top-paying careers within 10 years such as radiologist or orthopedic surgeon. Medical reimbursements overall seem to be continuing their decline so who knows if these fields will make much economic sense in the coming years.

One career I've recommended to many people to no avail is radiation oncology tech. After completing a two-year program you start at about $60k. After 3-4 years working you can move into dosimetry and make more than $100k and live practically anywhere in the country you like. The only thing I've found is that getting more information about this field can be difficult. You might start by contacting a radiation oncology center about job-shadowing.

Under-paid for the level of education required careers IMHO include pharmacy (the pay can be OK if you're willing to go anywhere), optometrist (never let Wal-mart take over your profession), most PhDs, and pediatric medicine (people don't do this for the money anyway though).

Speaking of pharmacy it is my understanding that you can still do it as an undergrad program in Canada though I'm not sure about the details of doing so then acquiring a US license. Otherwise its a 4 year bachelors then 4 more years for a PharmD.

Personally I didn't choose any of the above options of course :)

#8 kismet

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Posted 21 August 2008 - 07:45 PM

Biogerontology obviously *inserts wishful thinking*

#9 bio123

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Posted 22 August 2008 - 02:27 AM

The majority of jobs listed above are in the pauper category compared to Internet Poker Pro :)
Qualifications: A few months experience helps. Other: patience, self-discipline.
Salary: third-rate players (IMO) $2-3k p/w. Decent players: $5k p/w. Expert: $10k++ p/w.
Tax-free here in Australia :) (Not so in oppressive totalitarian regimes, e.g. USA.)

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#10 niner

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Posted 22 August 2008 - 02:55 AM

1. Nuclear engineering
2. Chemical engineering
3. Aerospace engineering
4. Nanotechnolgy
5. Medical
6. Law
7. Management Information System / Database Security

I really don't see the demand for nuclear, chem, and aerospace engineering. I have relatives in all three areas. Nanotech is a winner, imho. As LSP noted, medical reimbursement continues to slide. Law... don't know. Probably not a huge growth area, especially with internet outfits doing the simple bread and butter stuff really cheap. MIS/DB? Isn't this kind of moving down the expertise ladder, becoming kind of a commodity job? I may be off base on that. If the goal is to maximize money by, say, age 40, consider getting into one of the trades like plumbing, electrical, auto mechanics, HVAC. Make good money while your friends are in school running up huge debts. Learn to invest, and invest early and heavily. By the time your friends get their student loans paid off, you can retire, or go to school. Think about it. Anyway, everything on the list except nanotech is kind of yesterday's big thing. Of course, in ten years, nanotech might be that too, but probably not. I think it will have pretty good legs. A possible angle for ChemE is new sustainable processes, and replacements for petroleum. All IMHO, of course.

#11 lunarsolarpower

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Posted 22 August 2008 - 03:12 AM

As LSP noted, medical reimbursement continues to slide.


Another trend I forgot to mention is the rate that college tuition has been increasing above the rate of inflation over the past 40 years. I don't know when the cutoff point is or was but at some point it simply isn't/won't be worth it to go to college on a strictly financial basis.

There seem to be about 4 batchelor's degrees I'm aware of that earn decent salaries at least capable of making the loan payments of going to a private school. They are Accounting, Nursing, Engineering and Education. Nearly all the rest require some kind of outside factor such as further education, good connections or great talent to provide an immediate return on investment of any significance.

#12 Ghostrider

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Posted 22 August 2008 - 03:56 AM

As LSP noted, medical reimbursement continues to slide.


Another trend I forgot to mention is the rate that college tuition has been increasing above the rate of inflation over the past 40 years. I don't know when the cutoff point is or was but at some point it simply isn't/won't be worth it to go to college on a strictly financial basis.

There seem to be about 4 batchelor's degrees I'm aware of that earn decent salaries at least capable of making the loan payments of going to a private school. They are Accounting, Nursing, Engineering and Education. Nearly all the rest require some kind of outside factor such as further education, good connections or great talent to provide an immediate return on investment of any significance.


I am surprised that no one has mentioned computer science. Personally, aside from maybe medicine, I think that skilled people in that field will do quite well. (I hope anyway because I am in that field.) I chose electrical engineering, it's cool, I like it, but I would recommend computer science over that for those students who can't decide. Electrical engineers are becoming an importable commodity, but there is still a lack of very good programmers and computer scientists. AGI might be our only hope...

#13 Adaptogen

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 11:56 PM

okay it's been 4 years since this discussion. what changes have you seen? what are the new best jobs for the future?

i'm currently between majors at university and trying to clear a path for the future

#14 Mind

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 07:46 PM

It is still nanotech, comp sci/programming, and biotech with the most upside, IMO.

#15 lifebuddy

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 07:49 AM

skip the boss, employ yourself

#16 forever freedom

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 12:32 PM

As usual, the most lucrative jobs are in the finance industry. Investment banking, hedge funds, private equitiy, are hot now and will continue to be hot in 10 years.

#17 nupi

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 05:07 PM

Except that entry level IB and PE positions are not paid that well anymore but remain rather painful... But yes, if you truly are good and can take the lifestyle (which includes the hours AND the coworkers), finance it still is.

Disclaimer: I have a Master of Finance and a top tier MBA and I choose not to work in IB or PE, mainly because of the lifestyle but also because the entry level work is just too boring...

Edited by nupi, 18 December 2012 - 05:09 PM.


#18 platypus

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 05:15 PM

As usual, the most lucrative jobs are in the finance industry. Investment banking, hedge funds, private equitiy, are hot now and will continue to be hot in 10 years.

Yeah, too bad it's really difficult to find people in that business who actually like the job and their colleagues. Many are there just to earn a buck before retirement.

Ideally one should look for a job which one could imagine paying for doing, i.e. something meaningful and interesting.

#19 Adaptogen

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 01:11 AM

skip the boss, employ yourself


sounds good, where do I start?

#20 lifebuddy

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 01:18 AM

What are you good at? Do you work in an industry that is well known for startups? Look at what people are doing and think...how could I do that better?

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#21 Adaptogen

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 02:34 AM

I have no "special skills" so to speak. I'm only 20 and have no prior work experience but I like good multimedia (film, music), I am a fairly good writer i think, creative, intuitive and have pretty good people skills.

I am currently in undergraduate studies. The smart choice for me would be to buckle down and study something like computer science, medicine, or engineering..but I lack the academic motivation. I always struggle in hard math classes because I never do my homework or study an even decent amount. I am signed up for linguistics courses this semester, which i was enthusiastic about earlier, but now think they will be kind of a waste of time. that is, unless majoring in linguistics could get me a career in marketing/writing, but i am not sure how available these jobs are

Edited by Adaptogen, 19 December 2012 - 03:02 AM.





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