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#1 goatz

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Posted 18 September 2008 - 09:23 PM


Hello,

Not technically skin care but I wondering what you clever people think is the best toothpastes and/or dental care products are?

Does anyone subscribe to the thinking of 'flouride being toxic and should be avoided'

Thanks
Lee

#2 Iam Empathy

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Posted 18 September 2008 - 09:33 PM

subscribe

#3 Fredrik

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Posted 18 September 2008 - 11:32 PM

Not to keen on fluoride in toothpaste. I get it from all the green tea I drink instead.

I do like:

  • NOW foods Xyliwhite toothpaste with 25% xylitol
  • Biotene Oralbalance moisturizing gel, twice a day after brushing. Contains enzymes + xylitol
  • floss, boring but even more important than brushing your teeth because bad stuff is more likely to happen between teeth rather than on them


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#4 ajnast4r

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Posted 19 September 2008 - 12:58 AM

avoiding fluoride in toothpaste and mouthwash is FOOLISH... its one of the only things with solid science behind it to strengthen teeth and prevent cavities.

ok, ive been reading into this A LOT lately.. and after much research this is my regimen.

1st.. see a dentist, get a dental scaling done. removes plaque & bacterial colonies... stop gum bleeding

morning:

floss - oral B ultra floss
tongue scraper (a must imo)
brush (soft) w/ colgate total + white (fluoride + antibacterial agents)
rinse w/ act restoring mouthwash (remineralizes of teeth & caries)


night:

floss
tongue scraper
brush w/ arm & hammer enamel care (soluble calcium & phosphorus, remineralizes teeth & caries + whitens)


gum: multiple times, especially after meals

trident w/ xylitol

or

trident extra-care w/ recaldent (remineralizes teeth)

Edited by ajnast4r, 19 September 2008 - 01:00 AM.


#5 mustardseed41

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Posted 19 September 2008 - 03:12 AM

Hello,

Not technically skin care but I wondering what you clever people think is the best toothpastes and/or dental care products are?

Does anyone subscribe to the thinking of 'flouride being toxic and should be avoided'

Thanks
Lee


I use Tom's of Maine fluoride free toothpaste. To the previous poster. There must be plenty of fools on this site and elsewhere then.
I see you have bought into the fluoride brainwashing that started many moons ago.

I use this devise also. Works great. http://www.amazon.co...r/dp/B001CZIFVI

#6 ajnast4r

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Posted 19 September 2008 - 03:42 AM

There must be plenty of fools on this site and elsewhere then.
I see you have bought into the fluoride brainwashing that started many moons ago.



can you prove fluoride in toothepaste/mouthwash is dangerous & does NOT help prevent cavities/caries?

#7 mustardseed41

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Posted 19 September 2008 - 03:44 AM

There must be plenty of fools on this site and elsewhere then.
I see you have bought into the fluoride brainwashing that started many moons ago.



can you prove fluoride in toothepaste/mouthwash is dangerous & does NOT help prevent cavities/caries?


Can you prove it is safe?

#8 ajnast4r

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Posted 19 September 2008 - 04:03 AM

There must be plenty of fools on this site and elsewhere then.
I see you have bought into the fluoride brainwashing that started many moons ago.



can you prove fluoride in toothepaste/mouthwash is dangerous & does NOT help prevent cavities/caries?


Can you prove it is safe?






these statements are mostly bout water fluoridation, but they would apply to toothpaste/mouthwash as well... especially since systemic absorbtion would be considerably lower than drinking fluoridated water. reading the attached links will cover the 'effective' part as well.






http://www.ada.org/p...nity_safety.asp

Throughout more than 55 years of research and practical experience, the overwhelming
weight of credible scientific evidence has consistently indicated that fluoridation of
community water supplies is safe. The possibility of any adverse health effects from
continuous low-level consumption of fluoride has been and continues to be extensively
studied. Of the hundreds of credible scientific studies on fluoridation, none has shown
health problems associated with the consumption of optimally fluoridated water.

In 2000, the U.S. Surgeon General David Satcher wrote in his report, Oral Health in
America, “Community water fluoridation is safe and effective in preventing dental caries
in both children and adults. Water fluoridation benefits all residents served by
community water supplies regardless of their social or economic status.” Additionally,
the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institute of Dental and
Craniofacial Research continue to support water fluoridation as a safe method of
preventing tooth decay in people of all ages.




http://lpi.oregonsta...erals/fluoride/

Linus Pauling Institute Recommendation

The safety and public health benefits of optimally fluoridated water for prevention of tooth decay in people of all ages have been well-established. The Linus Pauling Institute supports the recommendations of the American Dental Association and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which include optimally fluoridated water as well as the use of fluoride toothpaste, fluoride mouthrinse, fluoride varnish, and when necessary, fluoride supplementation.



http://www.cdc.gov/m...ml/rr5014a1.htm

Fluoride is the only nonprescription toothpaste additive proven to prevent dental caries. When introduced into the mouth, fluoride in toothpaste is taken up directly by dental plaque (132--134) and demineralized enamel (135,136).

The safety of fluoride, which has been documented comprehensively by other scientific and public health organizations (e.g., PHS [8], National Research Council [9], World Health Organization [10], and Institute of Medicine [11])


http://www.health.ql...de/articles.asp

Evidence of the safety of water fluoridation

*
The use of fluorides in Australia: guidelines Australian Research Centre for Population Oral Health, Dental School, The University of Adelaide, South Australia; Australian Dental Journal 2006;51:(2):195-199.
*
World Health Organization, 1994. Fluorides and oral health: report of a WHO expert committee on oral health status and fluoride use. Geneva: World Health Organization.
*
Evans W, Morgan M, Conn J. Dental fluorosis prevalence in Melbourne 12-yearolds is within expected limits. Presented at the IADR ANZ Division 38th Annual Scientific Meeting: Brisbane 27-29 September 1998.
*
World Health Organization, 2006. Fluoride in Drinking-water. London: IWA Publishing on behalf of the World Health Organization.
*
World Health Organization, World Dental Federation and International Association for Dental Research, 2006. Call to Action to promote dental health by using fluoride.
*
National Health and Medical Research Council. Dietary guidelines for all Australians. Canberra: Commonwealth of Australia; 2003.
*
Food Standards Australia New Zealand, 2007. Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code. Canberra: Food Standards Australia New Zealand.
*
Australia New Zealand Food Authority. Development of joint Australia New Zealand Food Standards as part of the process of review of the Food Standards Code. Infant formula. Preliminary inquiry report. Canberra: Australia New Zealand Food Authority; 1999.
*
Silva M, Reynolds EC. Fluoride content of infant formulae in Australia. Australian Dental Journal 1996; 41(1):37-42.
*
National Research Council Subcommittee on Health Effects of Ingested Fluoride. Health effects of ingested fluoride. Washington DC: National Research Council; 1993.
*
Centres for Disease Control and Prevention. Achievements in public health, 1990-1999: fluoridation of drinking water to prevent dental caries. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 1999; 48 (41):933-940.
*
Sinclair MI, Kazda H, Cicuttini FM, Fairley CK. Public Health Effects of Water Fluoridation. Melbourne: Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University & Cooperative Research Centre for Water Quality and Treatment; 1998.
*
World Health Organization International Programme on Chemical Safety. Environmental health criteria 227: fluorides. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2002.
*
Medical Research Council Working Group. Water fluoridation and health. United Kingdom: Medical Research Council; 2002.
*
US Department of Health & Human Services. Fluorides, Hydrogen Fluoride and Fluorine. 2003 [accessed January 2005].
*
National Health and Medical Research Council, A Systematic Review of the Efficacy and Safety of Water Fluoridation, Australian Government 2007.
*
Choice Australia review: Fluoride: Is fluoride good for your teeth, or a slow poison? Choice, 2008.
*
McDonagh M, Whiting P, Wilson P et al. Systematic review of water fluoridation. Br Med J 2000; 321: 855-9.


Edited by ajnast4r, 19 September 2008 - 04:04 AM.


#9 lucid

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Posted 19 September 2008 - 05:05 AM

Anyone into liquid calcium (PCR) techs for teeth? I use Biotene as a mouthwash and a toothpaste. I read a few studies and it looks pretty awesome for remineralization.

#10 mustardseed41

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Posted 19 September 2008 - 05:09 AM

Since I've not gotten a cavity since I quit using fluoride, I think I'll opt to not put a known poison in my toothpaste or drinking water. YMMV.

http://www.amazon.co...g/dp/0913571032

Edited by mustardseed41, 19 September 2008 - 05:13 AM.


#11 spacey

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Posted 19 September 2008 - 08:02 AM

Flossing is real boring, get a Waterpik instead they're more effective too.

#12 Heliotrope

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Posted 19 September 2008 - 11:00 PM

I brush often, but only occasionally floss :(, due to laziness and boring-ass event of flossing teeth. but your teeth health literally hangs by a thread, a piece of this dental thread. I'll get some of the flossers , since they are easier to use and can be flossed using one hand. I use regular, popular brand toothpastes as they're easier to get from stores.

My mom got me a prescription for a potent liquid toothpaste, but forgot to bring it back to college. I don't want to accidentally swallow these anyway.

I dont use mouthwash. To freshen breath, i use mint candy , bubble gum etc.


not sure about the fluoirde. all the toothpaste i use (like Crest, Colgate) contains fluoride, but I make sure not to swallow much and rinse thoroughly. I've heard a part of a lecture saying (a Chinese source, w/ some professor from a prominent medical school in Shanghai) that too much fluoride ingested is bad for the brain, so I subscribe to the thinking of 'flouride being toxic and should be avoided' , but really, how much flouride is too much? what level will really cause problems? mental retardation ?

Edited by HYP86, 19 September 2008 - 11:04 PM.


#13 Heliotrope

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Posted 20 September 2008 - 12:17 AM

Flossing is real boring, get a Waterpik instead they're more effective too.



are they like one-handed flossers? i sometimes just use a toothpick.

two handed flossing is boring and tiring and un-conducive to multi-tasking.

Edited by HYP86, 20 September 2008 - 12:19 AM.


#14 Ben

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Posted 20 September 2008 - 11:48 AM

I wish I knew where to get anything containing recaldent in Australia without having to buy in bulk from a professional supplier. Considering it is an Australian invention, created also in my state, it seems a little unfair that I can't find it in any product here.

#15 spacey

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Posted 22 September 2008 - 11:01 AM

Flossing is real boring, get a Waterpik instead they're more effective too.



are they like one-handed flossers? i sometimes just use a toothpick.

two handed flossing is boring and tiring and un-conducive to multi-tasking.


It's an oral irrigator, a device that delivers small precise high-pressure rays of water to prevent plaque etc.

#16 spacetime

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Posted 23 September 2008 - 07:05 PM

We really need a tooth/teeth/oral health subforum. Topics to include are numerous. Electric toothbrushes worth it, and if so which ones. Preferred toothpastes and or mouthwashes. Tooth remineralization. Tooth whitening procedures. Gum healthcare. Flossing, waterpick etc. Cavity prevention. Could even venture into cosmetic dentistry as well.

#17 lunarsolarpower

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Posted 24 September 2008 - 04:21 AM

We really need a tooth/teeth/oral health subforum. Topics to include are numerous. Electric toothbrushes worth it, and if so which ones. Preferred toothpastes and or mouthwashes. Tooth remineralization. Tooth whitening procedures. Gum healthcare. Flossing, waterpick etc. Cavity prevention. Could even venture into cosmetic dentistry as well.


I like that idea. Oral health and longevity. The question is, what to do with all the discussions of amalgam/mercury and fluoride that would quickly clog it up? Other than that it sounds great to me.

There are specific age-related changes that occur in the oral region that will need to be reversed in any comprehensive rejuvenation protocol. Also dental science often leads the field of medical research from the days of Horace Wells to Branemark's work on osseointegration of titanium implants in the 1950s to the future of tissue engineering.

#18 goatz

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Posted 25 September 2008 - 08:39 AM

Thanks for your help everyone!

I have now decided to use the following regime.

Sonicare toothbrush
Waterpik
Toms of maine flouride free with xylitol (xyliwhite is too hard to find in the UK)
GC Tooth mouse (CPP ACP)
Floss sticks

Thanks
G

#19 sentinel

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Posted 25 September 2008 - 06:07 PM

Thanks for your help everyone!

I have now decided to use the following regime.

Sonicare toothbrush
Waterpik
Toms of maine flouride free with xylitol (xyliwhite is too hard to find in the UK)
GC Tooth mouse (CPP ACP)
Floss sticks

Thanks
G


Oooh the electric toothbrush debate!! ;) I had a sonicare and the best thing about it was that it was so lousy at cleanining between my teeth that it forced me to floss regularly. Technology indeed.. I now use a high end Braun with special plastic bits to clean between your teeth. Not much better.
£180 later my old tooth brush is looking pretty good.....

#20 HereInTheHole

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Posted 26 September 2008 - 10:11 PM

I've been using a xylitol-containing toothpaste (Spry) and using xylitol as a sweetener. Plaque that has been on the backside of my bottom teeth for a few years is disappearing.

#21 jamfropsi

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Posted 05 October 2008 - 11:02 AM

Flossing is real boring, get a Waterpik instead they're more effective too.


i do waterpik a.m., floss p.m.




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